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0-6-2 Locomotives

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Last Updated: 30 December 2020

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Building locomotives for stock was not common practice and fluctuations in World sugar markets post World War I unexpectedly reduced demand for these engines, leaving a number of them unsold on the factory floor. Alco turned to the domestic short line Railroad market, but it was not until 1923 that tiny Narragansett Pier Railroad in Peace Dale, Rhode Island, purchased engine, assigned it number 11, and put it to work on their eight and half mile railroad. Number 11s tenure in Rhode Island lasted fourteen years. It was replaced with gas-mechanical locomotive in 1937 and sold to Bath & Hammondsport Railroad in Hammondsport, New York. B & H, operating nine miles between its namesake communities, primarily serves regions note wine producers which give rise to the railroad nickname, Champagne Trail. Through its working career at both NP Railroad and B & H Railroad, engine 11 was a living symbol of the great American tradition of small independent railroads connecting local communities with the national Rail network. Weighing a mere 55 tons, its modest proportions were typical of light short line locomotives all across the country in the age of steam power. Bath & Hammondsport Railroad retired number 11 in 1949 in favor of diesel power and engine, object of some sentimental attachment, was carefully stored in railroads enginehouse until sold in 1955 to Dr. Stanley A. Groman for his Rail City museum in Sandy Pond, NY. Dr. Groman was a pioneer railroad preservationist and for many years locomotives operated on his mile-long circle of track near the shore of Lake Ontario. But eventual construction of interstate highways siphon visitors away and Rail City, like many roadside attractions of the 1950s, withers and eventually close. Around 1977, engine 11 was sold to another collector, Dr. John P. Miller, who had earlier purchased Narragansett Pier Railroad. Thus it was that the locomotive returned to the enginehouse at Peace Dale, Rhode Island. Some disassembly and inspection work was done but Dr. Miller never completed the overhaul and number 11 was sold again, in 1981, to Middletown & New Jersey Railroad of Middletown, NY. Pierre Rasmussen, president of M & NJ, was a fan of steam engines and thought number 11 would be an ideal addition to his short line. The locomotive was stored inside M & NJ enginehouse, protected from weather, but no further repairs were ever done. With the sale of Railroad pending following Pierre Rasmussens ' death in 2004, ownership of number 11 transferred to James Wright, business partner in M & NJ. Wright, in turn, sold the engine to Alan Maples, president of Everett Railroad, in 2006.

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* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

2-6-2 "Prairie" Locomotives

Few wheel arrangements can't be covered by Whyte notation. This includes Turkish arrangement that start out as 2-60. But when a pair of carrying wheels were added to the design, between central and rear driving axles to fix axle load issue, it cannot be explained using Whyte notation. Some steam locomotives, although rare, don't rest their driving wheels on rails. This is also impossible to explain using the Whyte notation. Driving wheels rest atop other wheels. This was done to try to multiply the power of locomotive, or to act like gearing. Such designs were not set into production by railroad companies. Either through cost, height or other factors such as axle weight, they weren't able to be used on most railroads.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Researching Rights-Of-Way

Page Contents: American Locomotive Company Alco, Schenectady, NY-Alco Historic Photos American Locomotive Company was formed in 1901 when seven smaller Locomotive Builders merged with Schenectady Locomotive Works in order to compete against the largest Locomotive Builder of the day, Baldwin Locomotive Works. Seven Locomotive Builders were: Brooks Locomotive Works, Cooke Locomotive & Machine Work, Dickson Manufacturing Company, Manchester Locomotive Works, Pittsburgh Locomotive & Car Work, Rhode Island Locomotive Works and Richmond Locomotive Works. In 1906, Alco entered into the automobile business and exited after only seven years because it proved to be unprofitable. During World War II, Alco produced Army tanks, tank destroyers, shells, bombs, gun carriages, gun mounts and 4 488 Locomotives. Employment increased three fold to over 15 000 people by 1945. Builder Location Years in Production Year of Merger Locomotives built Prior to Merger Brooks Locomotive Works Dunkirk, NY 1869-1901 4200 Cooke Locomotive & Machine Work, Paterson, NJ 1852-1926 1901 3000 Dickson Manufacturing Company, Scranton, PA 1862-1909 1901 1400 Manchester Locomotive Works Manchester, NH 1849-1913 1901 1800 Montreal Locomotive Works Montreal, QB 1900-today 1902 Pittsburgh Locomotive & Car Work Pittsburgh, PA 1867-1919 1901 2700 Rhode Island Locomotive Works Providence, RI 1866-1907 1901 3400 Richmond Locomotive Work Richmond, VA 1886-1927 1901 4500 Rogers Locomotive Works Paterson, NJ 1837-1913 1905 6300 Schenectady Locomotive Works Schenectady, NY-1968 1901 NOTE: Some sources State that Richmond only Built 1000 Locomotives starting at CN 1600 and then include gaps in their numbering scheme. In 1955, the company became known as Alco Products, Inc and in 1964 it was bought by Worthington Corp. Over all of its time, Alco produced about 75 000 locomotives with more than 63 % of them built in Schenectady, NY. In fact, all of Locomotive Manufacturing was consolidated in Schenectady in 1931 and continued until 1968. Alco has had a lot of firsts throughout its history, including: first steam locomotive produced by Rogers Locomotive Works was wood burning sandusky built by Rogers in 1837. The first commercially successful diesel electric Locomotive First diesel-electric passenger locomotive in the USA First streamline Locomotive produced in America Alco acquired exclusive rights to Sir Nigel Gresley's conjugate lever invention which was use on 3-cylinder steam Locomotives. Alco has become much more successful at building 3-cylinder steam locomotives than any other Builder. American Locomotive Company was known for some of the finest steam locomotives ever build. A few examples of these fine locomotives were: New York Central Hudsons, New York Central Niagras Union Pacific Challengers Union Pacific Big Boys. Most of general files, technical manuals and Alco designs are located in the Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University. The Builder's Photos and many of the Erecting Cards and Painting Diagrams are in the possession of the Mohawk & Hudson Chapter of NRHS. This group of volunteers is know as the Alco Historic Photos Project and is preserving over 32 000 Alco negatives. Alco Historic Photos P. O.

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Studying Diesels

Locomotives and rolling stock are essential workhorses of any railway system, and for many, they present the most visible public face of railways. From an initial collection of just 5 steam locomotives and a handful of carriages and goods wagons in 1859, Victorian Railways' fleet grew to number 528 steam locomotives, 1 150 carriages and 10 000 goods vans and wagons in 1900, with Railways carrying 55 million passengers and 3. 4 million tons of freight. After peaking in 1918 with 817 steam locomotives, VR engine fleet had to undergo dramatic change in the early 1950s with the introduction of diesel locomotives. Three hundred steam engines were scrapped in just 12 years and the last steam engines retired another 8 years later. Steam locomotives have long held the fascination of young and old alike. From the sharp pant of exhaust as the steam engine works up steep grade, to the gentle whisper of escaping steam as it sits patiently on a platform awaiting departure, steam locomotive appears to 'breathe' with life of its own. First S class diesel locomotives must have been particularly impressive spectacle to generations born in the grit and grime of steam age: roaring past trackside bystander, resplendent in gleaming blue and gold VR paintwork with throaty growl of 1 800 horsepower V-16 engine and thousand ton load in tow.


Electric trains

Although electrification of Melbourne's suburban railway network was first discussed in the 1890s, it was not until 1908 that serious planning for conversion occur. Overhead single 1 500-volt wire system was selected with direct-current traction motors. Testing of the first electric trains occurred on Flemington branchline in October 1918, with passenger services being rolled out across all suburban lines between 1919 and 1923. Melbourne's earliest electric rolling stock consisted of ubiquitous red passenger trains, popularly known in later years as 'red rattlers'. Most of these carriages date back to the pre-electric era, with the oldest being cross-compartment'swing-door carriages first built for steam operate suburban services in 1888. With planning for electrification of Melbourne's suburban network already underway, new standard type of suburban passenger carriage was introduced in 1909 designed for easier conversion to electric operation. The new design features a wider body with sliding external doors for improved safety and interconnecting passage-way between compartments. Later known as tait carriages, they remained in service until 1984. From the outset of suburban electric services, standard electric passenger trains was made up of maximum 7-carriage consist. Smaller trains of four, two and one carriage only were used for off-peak services and operations on lower patronise outer metropolitan lines. Rolling stock all consists of motor cars, trailer cars and driving trailers. Between 1921 and 1932, six suburban electric passenger carriages were converted into specialised parcel vans to provide separate fast parcel service throughout the metropolitan network. Fast parcel vans were repaint from 1960 in standard VR blue with a distinctive wide yellow side band. They were finally withdrawn in the 1980s when service was replaced by road trucks. On 21 July 1954, first non-metropolitan electric passenger service in Australia was inaugurated between Melbourne and Warragul hauled by L class electric locomotives. In addition to passenger services, primary role of L class locomotives was hauling heavy briquette trains from Yallourn and Morwell to Melbourne. With the decline of briquette traffic in the 1980s and extension of suburban electric passenger services as far as Warrigal in 1987, once mighty L class locomotives were withdrawn from service and mostly scrap.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Boston and Maine No. 3713

In 1934, B & M purchased five new Pacific type engines numbers 3710-3714. These engines contain several features that earn them the title of super power locomotives. After purchase of another batch of Pacifics railroad held a contest to give each engine name. 3713 was give name of the Constitution. 3713 worked as mainline passenger engine all the way till her decommissioning in 1958, after helping pull trains through flooded sections of track. Two years before decommissioning, 3713 hauled the final Steam-power revenue passenger train from Boston, Massachusetts to Portland, Maine on 22 of April 1956. In 1960, F. Nelson Blount acquired Locomotive and put it on display at numerous locations in Northeast until it reached its current residence at Steamtown.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Canadian National No.47

The Canadian National 47 is a class X-10-464 tank locomotive built in 1914 by Montreal Locomotive Works for Grand Trunk Railway as number 1542. This locomotive used to work on the Grand Trunk Western Railway until it was sold by Canadian National Railway and renumbered 47. No. 47 became CN Locomotive after the formation of Canadian National Railway in 1923; I TS CN classification was X-10a. Along with its sister locomotives, 47 was based in Montreal and it was used exclusively in commuter service. In this scene from 1961-during its brief career in preservation-47 hauls passenger trains around Bellows Falls area on the ex-B & M line out of North Walpole. T he Locomotive ran on the former Boston and Maine Railroad line out of North Walpole, New Hampshire until B & M was unable to come up with agreement. However, No 47 steam for only 5 weeks in 1961 as the Interstate Commerce Commission denied its boiler certification. The Fire was dropped on August 26 1961, and Locomotive is now Static Display at Steamtown; albeit in a poor state, having been exposed to elements.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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