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1940 in jazz

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Last Updated: 25 November 2020

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1940 in jazz

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country, jazz
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List of albums released

History Of Women in Jazz is an uneasy narrative. Herea€s music that acts as such a powerful force for racial integration in American society, and yet when it comes to gender, there was barrier for many decades in the Jazz World. Women singers were tolerated and even spotlight, especially with the advent of the big band era, but instrumentalists had a much tougher time of it. Many male Jazz musicians, writers, and fans believe that women could not play Jazz, or at least play it as well as men. When women instrumentalists do get to perform and record, response was often, you play pretty gooda€for woman. In this Night light show wea€ll look at some Jazz Women of the 1940s, decade when the cultural upheaval of World War II created more opportunities for female Jazz artists, as the ranks of male musicians were depleted by draft, and band leaders and nightclub owners were forced to expand their employment horizons. Featured artists include pianist and composer-arranger Mary Lou Williams, trumpeter Billie Rogers, vibraphonist Marjorie Hyams, International Sweethearts Of Rhythm big Band, and pianists Hazel Scott and Beryl Booker.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Births

Long before grunge-even before Louie Louie-there was a vibrant music scene in Seattle, one that was grounded in the speakeasy culture of the 1920s and nurtured by the wartime boom of 1940s. New musical traditions mingle with old to produce a rich stew of Jazz, swing, and rhythm and blues in nightclubs and dancehalls along Jackson Street and in the Central Area. It was here that up-and-coming stars such as Quincy Jones, Ray Charles, Ernestine Anderson, and, later, Jimi Hendrix began to make their marks on the world. Seattle's musical legacy was shaped by demographic changes that began in the early 1900s and accelerated during World War II. Tens of thousands of African Americans migrate to the city, drawn by the prospect of jobs and greater opportunities. They bring with them Jazz, Blues, and other styles of music that had originally developed in black communities in the South and Midwest. Seattle prove to be fertile ground for Jazz in part because of what writer Paul de Barros has called a culture of legalized corruption. Nightclub owners regularly pay off police and politicians in return for semi-official tolerance of gambling, prostitution, and illegal alcohol. A speakeasy climate developed after the enactment of prohibition in Washington State in 1916, but it persisted even after the law was repealed in 1933, largely because of the State's reluctance to legalize the sale of hard liquor by drink. Public establishments were not permitted to sell liquor by drink in Washington until 1949, and even then they were subject to strict regulations. Although illegal activities could be found in nightclubs throughout the city, gradually action come to be concentrated along Jackson Street. During its heyday, from 1937 to 1951, Jackson Street boasted 34 nightclubs. These were places, one former habitue recall, where people did everything but go home. Freewheeling, anything-go atmosphere extends to music. Talented musicians-locals as well as members of visiting name bands front by Lionel Hampton, Duke Ellington, Count Basie and others-come and go, learning from and teaching each other in jam sessions that often last all night. For black musicians, Jackson Street clubs were not only proving ground but also a major source of employment. Until the 1950s, music industry in Seattle was formally segregate. White musicians, represented by Local 76, play for white audiences in uptown theaters, nightclubs, and ballrooms. Black musicians, represented by negro Local 493, find work primarily in small nightclubs and dancehalls in racially mixed neighborhoods. Wages were lower on Jackson Street but, ironically, tips were better. More respectable venues began to open up on the eve of World War II, in response to population growth in the Central Area. Among these was the East Madison branch of the Young Men's Christian Association, established in 1936 in a small frame building at 23 and E Olive. Savoy Ballroom, later renamed Birdland in honor of legendary saxophonist Charlie Bird Parker, opened at 21 and E Madison Street in 1941.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Soloist(s)

- One or more solo instruments figure 1: Western JAZZ Quartet. Concert photo by Patricia Schneider. Figure 2: Trumpeter Wynton Marsalis and Lincoln Center JAZZ Orchestra figure 3: WMU's Gold Company vocal JAZZ Ensemble performing at Lincoln Center in New York City. Since the 1920s, JAZZ has undergone several stylisdtic transformations, most significant of which are described below. The modern Popular Music chart below, shows the development of main JAZZ styles in relation to other aspects of 20-Century popular music and culture. JAZZ played an important role in changing the socio-political landscape of the United States between 1920 and 1970. During roaring '20s, HOT JAZZ emerged as piano was added to the Rhythm section, and stronger driving rhythm was introduced with greater emphasis on soloist. In New Orleans, Black performers such Louis ARMSTRONG complete the transition from ragtime to JAZZ, creating a style known as Dixieland JAZZ or HOT JAZZ, as improvise over standard Blues patterns. Later, ARMSTRONG Take HOT JAZZ to CHICAGO, where its popularity grow rapidly with both Black and White audiences. ARMSTRONG is arguably the most influential performer in the history of American JAZZ. Piece Hotter Than that exemplifies many of the most innovative aspects of this new JAZZ style: it uses call and response techniques, it has complex syncopate polyrhythms, expressive Blue notes, and even a section with ARMSTRONG's famous scat singing. The piece has an introduction, main theme, and four varied improvised choruses. In 1925, bandleader Paul Whiteman premiered George GERSHWIN's Rhapsody in Blue and kicked off an orchestral JAZZ crossover movement that had an enormous impact on getting White listeners to love JAZZ. Although such works incorporate certain elements of the JAZZ tradition, there is not even a hint of improvisationthe. Scores are completely written out Note-for-Note. In the 1960s, Gunther SCHULLER developed the style known as Third Stream JAZZ by combining JAZZ combo with a symphony Orchestra. In the 1930s, famed JAZZ pianists Edward Duke ELLINGTON and William Count BASIE popularized pure JAZZ through big band style known as SWING. SWING bands feature large Ensemble of woodwinds, brass and back-Up accompaniment. From the late 1930s through 1950s, Duke ELLINGTON was one of the premier SWING band leaders in America. He was also one of the most creative composers in the history of JAZZ, particularly renowned for hits such as Take Train, and Satin Doll, as well as colorful and daring arrangements of classic JAZZ tunes. ELLINGTON expands ARMSTRONG's small Ensemble's intimate style of Dixieland JAZZ into a harder-edge full Band sound. His C Jam Blues feature a 12-bar blues pattern with each subsequent varied chorus initiated by 4-measure lead-in improvise over C chord harmony. ELLINGTON recorded this piece several times, but the most famous is from 1942, with the following improvised solo structure on choruses: piano-ELLINGTON, 2 JAZZ violin-Ray Nance, 3 trumpet-Rex Stewart, 4 tenor saxBen Webster, 5 tromboneJoe, Nanton, and 6 clarinetBarney Bigard.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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