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2016 Wimbledon Championships

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Last Updated: 26 November 2020

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2016 Wimbledon Championships

CategoryGrand Slam (ITF)
Date27 June - 10 July
Draw128S / 64D / 48XD
Edition130th
LocationChurch Road SW19 , Wimbledon , London , United Kingdom
Prize money£ 28.1 million
SurfaceGrass
VenueAll England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club

Andy Murray, second seed at Wimbledon, managed to make his way through some tough opponents to finals against Milos Raonic. Murray couldn't consistently break Raonic, but he fought the Canadian to two tiebreaks and won both of them convincingly, en route to his second championship at Wimbledon. Murray became the first British man to win twice at Wimbledon in over 70 years. Raonic was playing in his first ever Grand Slam final, but was unable to handle Murray. Raonic was trying to become the first Canadian man to win a Grand Slam after he best Roger Federer in a grueling five-set match in the semifinals. It will be back to the drawing board for Raonic, who also lost to Murray in the semifinals of the Australian Open earlier in year. Murray has been unable to consistently beat other top players like Novak Djokovic, Rafael Nadal and Federer, but when Djokovic was eliminated in the third round, all bets were off. Murray became the favorite to win a Grand Slam for the first time in his career, and win it he do. On his way to the finals, he took down No. 10 Tomas Berdych in straight sets in semifinals.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Point and prize money distribution

2008

2008Prize Money £ £Prize Money $ USDPrize Money € €% Change vs 2008
Winner£750,000$1,482,301$943,1597.14%
Runner-up£375,000$741,151$471,5797.14%
Semifinal£187,500$370,575$235,7907.14%
Quarterfinal£93,750$185,288$117,8955.87%
Round 4£50,000$98,820$62,8775.82%
Round 3£28,125$55,586$35,3683.97%
Round 2£17,000$33,599$21,3784.13%
Round 1£10,250$20,258$12,8902.50%

Although the Wimbledon Championships were sadly canceled for 2020, thanks to AELTC Pandemic Insurance, £10m of prize money was distributed amongst 620 players who would have taken part in the 2020 Championships. Players will receive one payment each and money, which comes as result of insurance cover for cancellation, will be distributed as follow: nice gesture from Wimbledon that has drawn plaudits from both players and fans, but it's worth noting the insurance policy had this as part of the terms of payout. So it wasn't done purely out of altruism: D. However, credit must be given to Wimbledon for having the foresight to purchase Pandemic Insurance after the SARS outbreak in 2003. AELTC has pay £25. 5m over a 17-year period, recover around £114m, making it a very sensible investment.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

2009

2009Prize Money £ £Prize Money $ USDPrize Money € €% Change vs 2008
Winner£850,000$1,383,283$989,86813.33%
Runner-up£425,000$691,642$494,93413.33%
Semifinal£212,500$345,821$247,46713.33%
Quarterfinal£106,250$172,910$123,73413.33%
Round 4£53,250$86,659$62,0126.50%
Round 3£29,250$47,601$34,0634.00%
Round 2£17,750$28,886$20,6714.41%
Round 1£10,750$17,494$12,5194.88%

2010

2010Prize Money £ £Prize Money $ USDPrize Money € €% Change vs 2009
Winner£1,000,000$1,513,203$1,207,14617.65%
Runner-up£500,000$756,601$603,57317.65%
Semifinal£250,000$378,301$301,78717.65%
Quarterfinal£125,000$189,150$150,89317.65%
Round 4£62,500$94,575$75,44717.37%
Round 3£31,250$47,288$37,7236.84%
Round 2£18,750$28,373$22,6345.63%
Round 1£11,250$17,024$13,5804.65%

2011

2011Prize Money £ £Prize Money $ USDPrize Money € €% Change vs 2010
Winner£1,100,000$1,770,994$1,215,75210.00%
Runner-up£550,000$885,497$607,87610.00%
Semifinal£275,000$442,749$303,93810.00%
Quarterfinal£137,500$221,374$151,96910.00%
Round 4£68,750$110,687$75,98410.00%
Round 3£34,375$55,344$37,99210.00%
Round 2£20,125$32,401$22,2437.33%
Round 1£11,500$18,515$12,7102.22%

2012

2012Prize Money £ £Prize Money $ USDPrize Money € €% Change vs 2011
Winner£1,150,000$1,785,437$1,450,0064.55%
Runner-up£575,000$892,719$725,0034.55%
Semifinal£287,500$446,359$362,5024.55%
Quarterfinal£145,000$225,120$182,8275.45%
Round 4£75,000$116,442$94,5669.09%
Round 3£38,875$60,356$49,01713.09%
Round 2£23,125$35,903$29,15814.91%
Round 1£14,500$22,512$18,28326.09%

2013

2013Prize Money £ £Prize Money $ USDPrize Money € €% Change vs 2012
Winner£1,600,000$2,380,456$1,855,71839.13%
Runner-up£800,000$1,190,228$927,85939.13%
Semifinal£400,000$595,114$463,92939.13%
Quarterfinal£205,000$304,996$237,76441.38%
Round 4£105,000$156,217$121,78140.00%
Round 3£63,000$93,730$73,06962.06%
Round 2£38,000$56,536$44,07364.32%
Round 1£23,500$34,963$27,25662.07%

2014

2014Prize Money £ £Prize Money $ USDPrize Money € €% Change vs 2013
Winner1,760,000$3,019,904$2,216,34610.00%
Runner-up£880,000$1,509,952$1,108,17310.00%
Semifinal£440,000$754,976$554,08610.00%
Quarterfinal£226,000$387,783$284,59910.24%
Round 4£117,000$200,755$147,33711.43%
Round 3£71,000$121,826$89,40912.70%
Round 2£43,000$73,782$54,14913.16%
Round 1£27,000$46,328$34,00114.89%

2015

2015Prize Money £ £Prize Money $ USDPrize Money € €% Change vs 2014
Winner£1,880,000$2,939,751$2,670,8346.82%
Runner-up£940,000$1,469,875$1,335,4176.82%
Semifinal£470,000$734,938$667,7086.82%
Quarterfinal£241,000$376,851$342,3786.64%
Round 4£127,000$198,590$180,4238.55%
Round 3£77,000$120,405$109,3918.45%
Round 2£47,000$73,494$66,7719.30%
Round 1£29,000$45,347$41,1997.41%

2016

2016Prize Money £ £Prize Money $ USDPrize Money € €% Change vs 2015
Winner£2,000,000$2,589,231$2,344,3916.38%
Runner-up£1,000,000$1,294,616$1,172,1966.38%
Semifinal£500,000$647,308$586,0986.38%
Quarterfinal£250,000$323,654$293,0493.73%
Round 4£132,000$170,889$154,7303.94%
Round 3£80,000$103,569$93,7763.90%
Round 2£50,000$64,731$58,6106.38%
Round 1£30,000$38,838$35,1663.45%

2017

2017Prize Money £ £Prize Money $ USDPrize Money € €% Change vs 2016
Winner£2,200,000$2,871,688$2,502,67310.00%
Runner-up£1,100,000$1,435,844$1,251,33710.00%
Semifinal£550,000$717,922$625,66810.00%
Quarterfinal£275,000$358,961$312,83410.00%
Round 4£147,000$191,881$167,22411.36%
Round 3£90,000$117,478$102,38212.50%
Round 2£57,000$74,403$64,84214.00%
Round 1£35,000$45,686$39,81516.67%

2018

2018Prize Money £ £Prize Money $ USDPrize Money € €% Change vs 2017
Winner£2,250,000$2,976,230$2,543,5222.27%
Runner-up£1,125,000$1,488,115$1,271,7612.27%
Semifinal£562,000$743,396$635,3152.18%
Quarterfinal£281,000$371,698$317,6582.18%
Round 4£163,000$215,611$184,26410.88%
Round 3£100,000$132,277$113,04511.11%
Round 2£63,000$83,334$71,21910.53%
Round 1£39,000$51,588$44,08811.43%

2019

2019Prize Money £ £Prize Money $ USDPrize Money € €% Change vs 2018
Winner£2,350,000.00$2,954,247$2,620,9834.44%
Runner-up£1,175,000.00$1,477,123$1,310,4924.44%
Semifinal£588,000.00$739,190$655,8044.63%
Quarterfinal£294,000.00$369,595$327,9024.63%
Round 4£176,000.00$221,254$196,2957.98%
Round 3£111,000.00$139,541$123,80011.00%
Round 2£72,000.00$90,513$80,30214.29%
Round 1£45,000.00$56,571$50,18915.38%

Men

2006 MenPrize Money £ £Prize Money $ USDPrize Money € €% Change vs 2005
Winner£655,000$1,207,240$947,4903.97%
Runner-up£327,500$603,620$473,7453.97%
Semifinal£163,750$301,810$236,8733.97%
Quarterfinal£85,150$156,941$123,1743.97%
Round 4£45,850$84,507$66,3243.97%
Round 3£26,520$48,879$38,3635.66%
Round 2£16,050$29,582$23,2173.95%
Round 1£9,830$18,118$14,2204.02%

Prize Money Breakdown for Wimbledon 2020

EventNo. of playersAmount per player (£)Amount per event (£)
Qualifying22412,5002,800,000
Singles25625,0006,400,000
Doubles1206,250750,000
Wheelchair166,00096,000
Quad Wheelchair45,00020,000
Total62010,066,000

Table

2007Prize Money £ £Prize Money $ USDPrize Money € €% Change vs 2006
Winner£700,000$1,410,352$1,031,8406.87%
Runner-up£350,000$705,176$515,9206.87%
Semifinal£175,000$352,588$257,9606.87%
Quarterfinal£88,550$178,410$130,5283.99%
Round 4£47,250$95,199$69,6493.05%
Round 3£27,050$54,500$39,8732.00%
Round 2£16,325$32,891$24,0641.71%
Round 1£10,000$20,148$14,7411.73%

Women

2006 WomenPrize Money £ £Prize Money $ USDPrize Money € €% Change vs 2005
Winner£625,000$1,151,946$904,0944.17%
Runner-up£312,500$575,973$452,0474.17%
Semifinal£151,500$279,232$219,1523.99%
Quarterfinal£76,650$141,275$110,8783.99%
Round 4£38,970$71,826$56,3723.98%
Round 3£21,210$39,092$30,6813.97%
Round 2£12,840$23,666$18,5743.97%
Round 1£7,860$14,487$11,3703.97%
* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Singles seeds Edit

2016 Gentlemen's Ladies' Singles Prize Money

CategoryAmount eachIncrease from 2015
Winners£2,000,0006.4%
Runners-up£1,000,0006.4%
Losing semifinalists£500,0006.3%
Losing quarterfinalists£250,0003.6%
Fourth round losers£132,0003.9%
Third round losers£80,0003.9%
Second round losers£50,0006%
First round losers£30,0003.5%

T age 32, Novak Djokovic is the second-oldest, top-seed Wimbledon mens singles player since Open Era began in 1968, when Grand Slam tournaments allowed professional players to compete with amateurs. He trails only Roger Federer, who set a record last year at age 36. In 2019, Federer is number-Two seed. Right behind him is Rafael Nadal, at age 33. The Aging of the Grand Slam Tennis elite isnt brand-New trend; Wimbledon has had seven number-One seeds over 30 since 2013, when 31-Year-old Serena Williams was favorite to win the women's singles event. But this stretch is unique in the modern history of tennis. Between 1973 and 2013, there wasnt single number-One seed at Wimbledon over the age of 30. And the trend doesnt seem to be dissipating much on the men's side. Women draw, however, look a lot different. At 23-years-old, Australian Ashleigh Barty is the youngest number-One seed since Caroline Wozniacki in 2011. Seeding, however, is one thing. What matters is who gets to lift the Gentlemens Singles Trophy and Venus Rosewater Dish when matches conclude. On women's side, Serena Williams sustain dominance skews data. In 2015 and 2016, at age 33 and 34 respectively, she was both the number-One seed and Wimbledon Champion. Her 2016 win made her the oldest Wimbledon women champion in modern history. Three next-oldest winners on the women's side were Martina Navratilova, Virginia Wade, and Billie Jean King, all of whom had to get past number-One-seed women at least a decade younger than them. On the men's side, only three players in their 30s have ever leave Wimbledon Champion: Federer, Djokovic, and Rod Laver. And only Laver entered as number-One seed. This year is a potential inflection point on both men's and women's sides. For men, win by any of the top-three seeded players would put them in record books as one of the oldestand potentially oldestWimbledon Singles Champions. On women's side, number-Two seed Naomi Osaka, age 21, was upset in the first Round on July 1. But Barty, aged 23, takes care of business. Let's call it wash for youngsters. Karolina Pliskova and Kiki Bertens, third-and fourth-seed, respectively, are both 27 and both made it out of the first round easily. But so do 11 seed, Serena Williams, who, at 37, would become the oldest Wimbledon Champion by three years if she were to go all way. Below are all of the Wimbledons top-seed players and winners since 1968: original version of this story misstated Roger Federers age when he was Wimbledons top-seed mens Singles player. He was 36, not 35.

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Table

EventChampionRunner-upScore
2016 Gentlemen's SinglesTemplate:Country data GBR Script error: No such module "Check for unknown parameters". Andy Murray23x15px Script error: No such module "Check for unknown parameters". Milos Raonic6-4, 7-6, 7-6
2016 Ladies' Singles23x15px Script error: No such module "Check for unknown parameters". Serena Williams23x15px Script error: No such module "Check for unknown parameters". Angelique Kerber7-5, 6-3
2016 Gentlemen's Doubles23x15px Script error: No such module "Check for unknown parameters". Pierre-Hugues Herbert 23x15px Script error: No such module "Check for unknown parameters". Nicolas Mahut23x15px Script error: No such module "Check for unknown parameters". Julien Benneteau 23x15px Script error: No such module "Check for unknown parameters". Edouard Roger-Vasselin6-4, 7-6 (7-1) , 6-3
2016 Ladies' Doubles23x15px Script error: No such module "Check for unknown parameters". Serena Williams 23x15px Script error: No such module "Check for unknown parameters". Venus Williams23x15px Script error: No such module "Check for unknown parameters". Timea Babos Template:Country data KAZ Script error: No such module "Check for unknown parameters". Yaroslava Shvedova6-3, 6-4
2016 Mixed DoublesTemplate:Country data FIN Script error: No such module "Check for unknown parameters". Henri Kontinen Template:Country data GBR Script error: No such module "Check for unknown parameters". Heather WatsonTemplate:Country data COL Script error: No such module "Check for unknown parameters". Robert Farah 23x15px Script error: No such module "Check for unknown parameters". Anna-Lena Gronefeld7-6 (7-5) , 6-4
* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Contenders

Can Novak Djokovic become the first male singles player to win all four Grand Slam events in same season since Rod Laver in 1969? The Wimbledon Championships is without doubt the premiere event in tennis and this year's version has no shortage of storylines with the top one involving top-rank Novak Djokovics quest for history. Lets take a look at key players in the field and what they bring to legendary grass for a chance at glory.-At Wimbledon: 3 titles. Defending Champion. Has won three straight Finals with wins in the last two by beating Federer in both.-At Wimbledon: beat Djokovic to win the final in 13. Lose to Federer in 12 final. Lose to Federer in the semifinals last year. Has made it to the semifinals in 6 of his last 7.-Grand Slams: 2 titles. Beat Djokovic to win both 12 US Open and 13 Wimbledon titles.-At Wimbledon: 7 titles. Lose in three Finals, including last two Finals to Djokovic.-Grand Slams: 17 titles. Has not won a Grand Slam title since 2012 at Wimbledon. Lose to Djokovic in the last two Grand Slam events of 15. Back issues forced Roger to miss his first Grand Slam event earlier this season after 65 consecutive appearances.-At Wimbledon: lose to Kyrgios in Round of 32 last year.-Grand Slams: 0 titles. Before this season, farthest Raonic has ever made it in a Grand Slam event was in the semifinals of Wimbledon in 2014. He equaled his career Grand Slam best by losing a 5-set semifinal heartbreaker to Murray in Australian Open this past January, week after winning in Brisbane.-At Wimbledon: lose to Richard Gasquet in the Round of 16 last year. Has 7-2 record here.-Grand Slams: 0 titles. The farthest Kyrgios has ever made it in a Grand Slam event was in the quarterfinals of the Australia Open in 15 and at Wimbledon in 14.-At Wimbledon: lost in quarterfinals past two years, including last year to Richard Gasquet.-Grand Slams: 2 titles, including the French Open last year. Lose in semifinals of French Open to Andy Murray earlier this month.-At Wimbledon: lose in Round of 64 last year. Just 1-2 All-Time.-Grand Slams: 0 titles. Lose to Novak Djokovic in the semifinals of the French Open earlier this month, farthest he has ever made it in a Grand Slam event.-At Wimbledon: lose in Round of 64 last year. Nishikori has never made the quarterfinals here.-Grand Slams: 0 titles. Lose 14 US Open final to Marin Cilic after upsetting Djokovic in semifinals. Lose to Djokovic in the Australian Open quarterfinals this past January.-At Wimbledon: lose in the Round of 16 last year. Lose in 2010 final to top-seed Rafael Nadal after upsetting 2 seed Federer in quarterfinals and 3 seed Djokovic in semifinals.-Grand Slams: 0 titles.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Pretenders

Two years since Grigor Dimitrov simultaneously break and stole a few hearts on Centre Court, ending Andy Murrays defence of his Wimbledon title by playing the kind of swaggering tennis that suggested he was on the verge of breaking into the elite, player who once looked destined for top is in danger of becoming lead character in cautionary tale about squandered talent. This is not how the story was supposed to unfold. Two days after thrashing Murray, Dimitrov-dashing, charming, brilliantly skilled-lose his semi-final against Djokovic in four engrossing sets that compelled the eventual champion to declare that he had played against a future star. Gifted Dimitrov had a lot: youth, good looks, forehand to make you go weak at knees, superstar potential. But Dimitrovs flair and chutzpah have been replaced by an air of angst and decay, and his preparations for the next fortnight have been shambolic, featuring defeats by Juan Martin del Potro in Stuttgart and Janko Tipsarevic in the first round of the Aegon Championships last week. Del Potro was playing his first match on grass in almost three years, while Tipsarevic had not won on surface since London 2012, and Dimitrov might have expected to beat opponents whose careers have stalled because of persistent injury problems. These setbacks have become commonplace, however, and Dimitrov arrives in south-west London as a former boy wonder and current world No39, sandwiched in rankings by Steve Johnson and Marcos Baghdatis, decline that should grab the attention of every young pretender on Tour. The spotlight at Wimbledon will shine on Dominic Thiem in particular after the 22-year-old Austrian reached his first Grand Slam semi-final at the French Open, losing against an inspired Djokovic, before the new world No begins his grass campaign by claiming his fourth title of the year in Stuttgart, beating Federer in the semi-final and Philipp Kohlschreiber in final. For Thiem, who was seeded eighth for Wimbledon on Wednesday, it is from this point that Dimitrovs's story becomes pertinent. When Dimitrov was justifying hype on Court, his relationship with Maria Sharapova had tongues wagging in gossip pages in 2014. But they would not live happily ever after and the Bulgarian has frequently looked lose in the past 18 months, tumbling from his career high of No in rankings and failing to get past the third round of a Grand Slam since losing against Murray in the fourth round at the Australian Open last year. I dont consider myself that young any more, he say, aged 24, after losing against Richard Gasquet at Wimbledon last year, defeat that was swiftly followed by the end of his increasingly unproductive alliance with tough Australian coach Roger Rasheed. As dip in form developed into a fully-blown crisis of confidence, Dimitrov suffered an astonishing meltdown against Diego Schwartzman in the final of the Istanbul Open last month. Leading 7-6 5-2, he was on course to win his first title since his Queens triumph in 2014.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sleepers

Serena Williams: it is hard to believe that the world number one hasnt won a major title since Wimbledon last year, but the American has yet to win a Grand Slam since she triumph over Garbine Muguruza in London last year. It was the sixth Wimbledon title of her career and her first since 2012. Rust may be the only thing that could get in her way this time around. She has played just five tournaments in 2016 and has one title to show for it. When on her game, she is still the best player in the world, and she will need to quickly find her rhythm on grass if she wants to defend her championship. Agnieszka Radwanska: Ninja, as she is referred to by her peers and fans, is one of the most entertaining players on the women's tour. She can hit an array of shots and has a finesse-style game that keeps her at almost every point. Despite being ranked second in the world and mainstay inside top 10 since last summer, Pole has reached just one Grand Slam final in her career, at Wimbledon four years ago. Her ousting at the French Open was tough to swallow for her as she blow one-set lead, thanks in part to multiple rain delays that forced that match to be played over multiple days. Grass surface has always been her favorite, and look for Radwanska to bounce back with a strong showing at the All-England Lawn Club. Madison Keys: 2016 has been Madison Keys ' best season to date, and her recent play during grass-court season has seen her catapult into the top 10 for first time in her career, and with her talent, she looks to remain there for years to come. She captured the title in Birmingham leading up to Wimbledon and her power-style seems to be perfectly suited to grass. Her best showing at Wimbledon was a quarterfinal appearance last year, and with former world number ones Victoria Azarenka and Maria Sharapova both missing from this year's draw, this could be the tournament that will see Keys break through with her maiden Grand Slam title.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Men's Week 2 Outlook

Conventional wisdom suggests Djokovic receive favorable draw. The top seeds in his section were Querrey and David Ferrer, and his opponent in the potential semifinal was Roger Federer, who, despite his prior success, hasn't played his best tennis as of late. That's what made his third-Round exit all the more shocking. He seemed like a virtual lock for the semifinals and heavy favorite to capture a third straight Wimbledon title. Instead, he doesn't even make the second week, and the men's bracket is suddenly wide-Open. ESPN Stats and Info further highlight the stunning nature of the loss, which came across two days due to weather conditions: full credit to Querrey, who rack up an astonishing 31 aces with just two double-faults to go along with 56 winners, 22 more than his top-seed counterpart. That say, Djokovic looked out of sorts throughout the match, and everybody else in the top half of the draw now sees golden opportunity. Federer is the marquee name of the group. The Seven-time Wimbledon Champion missed the French Open while working to get back to full strength, and it seem time off work. He's won each of his first three matches in straight sets, though the level of competition is mediocre. After beating Daniel Evans on Friday, he joked about taking full advantage of his time off between matches at age 34, per Nicolas Atkin of ESPN UK: Federer has won just one of his last 24 Grand Slam appearances and none since Wimbledon in 2012. At a point in his career where top form is much harder to maintain, he must do everything in his power to seize this chance to add another major to his already outstanding resume. That say, it's Andy Murray who will assume the role of favorite with Djokovic's exit. His draw also improved Friday when Juan Martin Del Potro knocked out fourth seed Stan Wawrinka, which left no top-tier players left in his path to the final. It creates a promising situation for the 2013 Wimbledon winner, but it's also a position he's not use to, As noted by Chris McKendry of ESPN: beyond high-profile names, there's multitude of other players hoping more navigable draw can lead to their big breakthrough. Milos Raonic, Kei Nishikori and David Goffin are the players with the most realistic chance of making it happen. One thing's for sure: early exit by Djokovic moves a lot more players into contention. It will be intriguing to see which ones rise to occasion next week.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Women's Week 2 Outlook

Wimbledon 2015 performance & points: Semi-finals, lose to Garbine Muguruza Fun fact: in ten appearances at Wimbledon, Radwanska has only twice failed to reach the second week of the tournament. Final thoughts: After an early loss in Birmingham, Radwanska has been rapidly adjusting to the grass in Eastbourne. Loss to Cibulkova in Quarter-finals from set and break up wasnt great shock with Wimbledon obviously priority. Theres always concern that Radwanska could get hit off court by a big hitter, but with careful preparation of her calendar and sight of No strapping, I believe that Radwanska is a contender for the title. Two things that will need to happen for her to go deep: shoulder remain healthy so she can serve to her maximum potential and not getting bogged down in lengthy drawn-out matches that eat away at her energy bank.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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