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2017 Science Fiction Novels

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Last Updated: 02 July 2021

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While last year has been rough for women around country, we lost protections for equal pay, reproductive rights have taken a serious hit, among other things, we have made significant strides in the face of increasingly obvious systemic sexism and misogyny. Cardi B became the first solo female rapper to top the singles chart in 19 Years, Patty Jensen's Wonder Woman maintained the best box office success of any superhero in 15 Years, Women are running for and winning political appointments at record high rates. Does that mean it wasn't worst year ever? Probably not, but at least there are few silver linings. Fantasy and sci-fi in particular are genres that don't have the best reputation for being inclusive when it comes to both the content in book and the name of the author in the book. For generations, they were dominated by white men who repeated the same narrative for the same audience, and over time, they garnered a particular unsavory reputation for being sexist and exclusionary to women, particularly women of color. In 2017, Amazon's Best Books list is telling a different story. Out of 20 selected titles in the category of sci-fi and fantasy, nine of the authors were women. Less than half of those featured female authors were people of color, which highlights the fact that these genres still have progress to make on behalf of equality for all, but strides women have made can't be overlook. It's true that 2017 has officially been the worst and most of us can't wait until it's over, but these nine women who are dominating science Fiction and fantasy will make you glad you didn't move to Canada after all. Naomi Alderman is an award winning author whose latest work of speculative fiction took home the Baileys Women's Prize for Fiction. Power weaves a dark Tale about a fierce future where teenage girls have dangerous powers that make them capable of causing severe pain or death. A fascinating exploration of power, gender, identity, and control, this rich and lyrical work once again proves Alderman is at the top of her game. Bestselling author VE Schwab first made waves in the fantasy world with her publication of Darker Shade of Magic, first in her thrilling series of fantasy adventures. In Conjuring of Light, Schwab's unforgettable characters return to fight on behalf of good against evil Magic one Last time. Expertly plot and imaginative as ever, this fitting conclusion will make you love Schwab and her beloved series even more. She may be debut author, but SA Chakraborty is already making a name for herself in the sci-fi and fantasy world. Her stunning first novel, City of Brass, tells the story of Nahri, con woman whose trickery turns out to be real Magic when she accidentally summons mysterious Djinn warrior Dara. Together, they travel to Daevabad, enchanted Brass City brimming where magic and danger lurk around every corner.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

The Power by Naomi Alderman

N aomi Aldermans brilliant science fiction novel Power justly won the Baileys prize for women's fiction last week. It deserved to win-but I never thought it would. The unstoppable rise of female-author and feminist science fiction tends to upset two distinct sets of stuffy traditionalists: sexists and literary snobs. But by insisting that only a certain sort of art is truly great, theyre missing out on some gorgeous books. Its always puzzling to meet nerds who have read Robert Heinlein and Isaac Asimov-but have not read, for example, Ursula K Le Guin and Octavia Butler; or modern literature buffs who worship Ben Lerner but have never heard of Lidia Yuknavitch. More than anything, though, it is just a pity. If you limit yourself to what feels safe, youll miss very stories that might change your life. Right now, real world seems to be out of ideas about how to organise its future-and that is exactly why women's fantasy futures feel more necessary than ever. Imagining alternative worlds is a political act, whether you want it to be or not, and for some reason, women and people of colour seem to have particular facility for building fictional worlds that feel both fresh and feasible. This is nothing new. For generations, women writers have been creating stories about what the future might look like, from dark and ominous dystopias to weird deep-space epics and surrealist explorations of sex and social power. Great many of our finest male science fiction writers had endless capacity to dream up seditious space battles and strange technology, but limited imagination when it come to societies that didnt have white, straight guys on top. In recent years, women, queer people and people of colour have horrified the hoary old guard by sweeping major science fiction prizes. Mainstream critics are just as horrified that their cosy, predictable world is suddenly full of science fiction writers. Literati do want nerds at their parties, and nerds dont want girls at their parties; and perhaps that is why writers such as Alderman-along with modern greats including NK Jemisin, Ann Leckie and Charlie Jane Anders-are producing such original, exciting work. No matter what they do, traditionalists will sneer and grumble-so you may as well be as weird and wonderful as you want. Until now, female-author and feminist science fiction has never had the audience or recognition it deserve. It has rarely been adapted for film or television, as Hollywood heaves with homogeneous stories of square-jawed heroes waging war in space. It takes video streaming service Hulu to take gamble on dramatising Margaret Atwoods cult classic Handmaids Tale: story of near-future America ruled by misogynist Christian fanatics obsessed with controlling women's fertility. The show is a lush and faithful adaptation of a book that now feels horrifically prescient. It was commissioned and shot before past election-and book was written in a decade when Donald Trump was still dodgy business bro sleazing around Manhattan, trying to get his picture in papers.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

The Wanderers by Meg Howrey

The private space industry made strides in 2017. SpaceX conducted 18 separate launches, as Elon Musk provided updates on his ambitions for colonizing Mars. So it is an excellent time for Meg Howreys ' novel Wanderers, which is about preparations for a fictional commercial mission to Mars. Howreys astronauts arent actually head into Space yet theyre conducting extensive simulation of the mission to determine how people will function through such an extended trip. And it is not just astronauts who are tested by their work: their families back home face their own hardships because of the mission. The book is an elegant look at the toll that space exploration could extract from people involve.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Void Star by Zachary Mason

Truly understanding artificial intelligence is rare. AI doesn't think in concepts and images the way humans do. It has individual goals, like to preserve humankind as technology's caretakers, or to dismantle complex systems. And in the sci-fi thriller Void Star, things are further complicated by the fact that AI's thoughts are actually glyphs, or waves of data, that only make sense to people with special cranial implants connect to the net. An elegant, if cerebral, examination of how both technology and humans process information is just one of many ideas explored in Void Star, out today. That is no surprise, considering that author Zachary Mason has spent the past two decades working on problems of computational linguistics. In his day job in Silicon Valley, Mason helps machines get smarterbut, on the side, he writes speculative fiction about what happens when machines become incomprehensibly smart, imagining the role of AI in a world consumed by climate change and inequality. Mason has always been fascinated by how the brains of computers work. When I was seven, I remember lying in bed and thinking about how great it would be to teach computers to talk, he say. When he attended college at 14, he resolved to answer these questions. After getting a PhD in computer science and artificial intelligence, he tried to figure it out through machine learning. He works on recommender system at Amazon, and he now heads up R & D at Intellus Learning, educational tech company that provides digital Learning materials to institutions. While Mason uses his day job to tackle present problems facing AI, he turns to fiction as a place to imagine its future. The novel follows the stories of three people who have neural implants that allow them to access all their memories permanently: Irina, who translates glyphs for humans; Thales, Brazilian political scion; and Akemi, aspiring actress. All are being sought by a mysterious AI, which is in business with megarich, 150-year-old tech magnate. The plot resists easy summation, filled as it is with memory-ghosts and other heady abstractions, but the novel grapples most urgently with the question of how peopleand other AIcan engage with beings who process the world using indecipherable systems. Fiction acts in some ways as thought experiment for Mason, allowing him to unspool concerns about AI that he's uniquely qualified to process. He's conceived of vision of AI that navigates between poles of our expectationsneither subservient to humans, nor vindictive golem. Imagine what it is like to be AI, he say. I wouldnt expect AI to work like human being, to try to accumulate political or economic power. Instead, AI in Void Star engage with humanity only as byproducts affected by their actions, while they compute otherworldly questions of symbol manipulation and truth. Mason finds no tension in fact that he works with AI today and imagines a future governed by them tomorrow. To him, villains arent AI: Theyre people who misuse AI to perpetuate very human aims.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Borne by Jeff Vandermeer

When was the last time you read a great biotech apocalyptic novel with gigantic flying bears? OK, so the premise sounds ridiculous, but trust me-Borne is more than worth your time for its imaginative characters, surreal narrative and its deeper themes about what it means to be alive. Set in a ruined city destroyed by war and ecological disaster, we follow Rachel, scavenger. The city is littered with dangerous creations, one of which is a giant predatory flying bear, left by a now abandoned biotech firm called Company, making life perilous for all city dwellers. One day, while scavenging, Rachel discovers Borne. Borne is a small green lump, to which Rachel feels unreasonably drawn. As Borne grows, so does Rachel's attachment. Eventually, Borne learns to speak and ultimately poses a threat to Rachel and the city as he begins to tip the balance of power and reveals that the company may not be as abandon as they first think. If you like your fiction weird and weighty, you'll love Borne.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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