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Adult Vaccination Schedule

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Last Updated: 02 July 2021

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A significant number of adults in the United States die of complications of Influenza, Pneumococcal infections, and Hepatitis B each year. Vaccines to prevent these diseases are very effective, but underused. Some adults incorrectly assume that vaccines they receive as children will protect them for the rest of their lives. This is true for certain diseases, such as polio. However, some adults were never vaccinated as children. New Vaccines such as chickenpox Vaccination were not available when many adults were children. And vaccinations for certain diseases must be repeated periodically to maintain immunity. In addition, certain Vaccines are given to adults but not children. This is because with aging, we become more susceptible to serious diseases caused by common infections. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Department of Health and Human Services through US Centers For Disease Control and Prevention make following Recommendations about Vaccines needed by All Adults: Varicella Vaccine Hepatitis B Vaccines Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine Tetanus-Diphtheria-Pertussis Vaccine Vaccines needed for those aged 50 years and older: Influenza Vaccine Vaccines need For those Age 60 Years and older: shingles Vaccine Vaccines need For those Age 65 Years and older: Pneumococcal Vaccine Vaccines need For All Health-care workers: Influenza Vaccine Complete Adult Immunization Schedule is available from CDC's National Immunization Program. Recommend immunizations for children are also updated annually by CDC and the American Academy of Pediatrics. The Quick Reference Vaccines Chart summarizes requirements for children and adults and includes information about additional protection for diseases such as Lyme Disease, anthrax, and polio. Side effects: reaction to Vaccine such as trouble breathing or seizure is a medical emergency. Call 911 immediately. For more minor side effects such as fever or soreness At site of the shot, call your doctor. After any reaction, tell your doctor what happen, date and time it happen, and when Vaccination was give. You may need to avoid similar vaccinations in the future. Tetanus is a disease caused by bacteria. These bacteria live in all outdoor environments, most commonly in soil. Any open injury to the skin can produce port of entry into the body. Once inside, bacteria may germinate and produce poisonous substances that interfere with nerve conduction. This can result in uncontrolled muscle spasms and may be fatal. Adults younger than 65 years may receive Tetanus, reduce Diphtheria, and Pertussis Vaccine as one-time alternative to Tetanus and Diphtheria if Pertussis component is indicate. Combination Vaccine is composed of Vaccines against Diphtheria, Tetanus, and Pertussis, another bacterial disease. This Vaccine is given routinely to children and is recommended for adults under 65 years of age who have never received dose of Tdap. The Incubation period is 48 hours to three or more weeks, with a median of seven days. With such a long incubation period, it is not surprising that the victim may not even remember wound. The most common symptom is stiffness of the jaw.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Flu Vaccine

Vaccines can help protect your health at every stage and every age of your life. Every year, thousands of adults in the US become seriously ill and are hospitalized because of diseases that Vaccines can help prevent, like flu and pneumococcal disease. Many adults even die from these diseases. By getting vaccinate, you lower your chances of getting certain diseases and help protect yourself from much of this unnecessary suffering. In addition, no one wants to get sick and miss weeks of work or school, or miss spending time with family and friends due to preventable disease. Vaccines also lower your chance of spreading disease. By getting vaccinate, not only do you stay healthier, but you can also help avoid spreading serious infectious disease, such as flu or whooping cough, to others. For example, some people in your family or community may not be able to get certain Vaccines due to their age or certain health conditions, and they depend on you to help prevent the spread of disease. Infants, older adults, and people with weakened immune systems are especially vulnerable to infectious diseases and their serious complications. Flu Vaccine-All adults need flu vaccine every year. It is especially important for people with chronic health conditions, pregnant women and older adults since they are at higher risk of flu complications. Tdap Vaccine / Td Vaccine-Every adult should get Tdap Vaccine once if they do not receive it when they were younger to protect against whooping cough, and then Td booster shot every 10 years. If you are going to be around a newborn, it is particularly important to get Tdap shot to help protect the baby from dangerous diseases like whooping cough before he or she can be fully vaccinate. Additionally, women should get Tdap Vaccine each time they are pregnant, preferably at 27 through 36 weeks, to protect themselves and their babies from whooping cough. Learn more by visiting our Pregnancy section. In addition to flu and Tdap Vaccines, adults between 19 and 49 years old may also need: HPV Vaccine-Protects against six HPV-related cancers and genital warts. The CDC recommends HPV Vaccine for men and women up to age 26 if they were vaccinated when they were younger. MMR Vaccine-large number of recent measles cases reported in the US are leading many adults to wonder if they are Protect from measles or if they need a booster shot. According to the CDC, if you were born after 1957, you need at least 1 dose of MMR Vaccine unless laboratory confirm that you have past measles infection or are immune to measles. Certain adults may need 2 doses of MMR. Talk to our healthcare provider to find out what you need. Find out more information about MMR vaccination of adults and measles, in general, in the Commonly-ask Questions section below and on the Vaccines and Diseases page.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Pneumococcal vaccine

Polysaccharide Vaccine consists of polysaccharides from 23 serotypes. This vaccine is less immunogenic, does not affect carrier rates, promotes herd immunity, or protects from respiratory tract infections as there is no mucosal immunity. Conjugate Vaccine with 13 serotypes consists of capsular polysaccharides covalently bound to diphtheria toxoid, which is highly immunogenic but nontoxic. This combination results in mucosal immunity and lifelong immunity. Table 8 summarizes key differences between Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine and Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine. PCV13 is approved in several countries worldwide, including the US, EU, and India, for use in adults aged > 50 years for prevention of pneumonia and / or invasive disease caused by Streptococcus pneumonia serotypes included in Vaccine. In immunocompetent adults, PPSV23 is indicated in those over the age of 65. Vaccine is also indicated for those with CKD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cirrhosis, diabetes, HIV, lupus, cancer and those on chemotherapy or radiotherapy, long-term steroid, asplenia, or splenectomy. Single dose PPSV23 is recommended in immunocompetent adults. In those who have received primary immunization, Vaccination is done with PPSV23 0. 5 ml single dose IM. In those who have not received primary Vaccination, PCV13 can be given followed by PPSV23 after a minimum interval of 8 weeks. If PPSV23 has been given earlier, PCV can be given after 1 year. Revaccination can be done with PPSV23 at least 5 years after first dose. Revaccination with PPSV23 within 5 years leads to hyporesponsiveness. Monitoring for seroconversion is not needed in year 2014, ACIP recommended routine use of PCV13 among adults aged 65 years. This was based on results of the CAPiTA trial that support evidence on efficacy of PCV13 against noninvasive Pneumococcal pneumonia among adults. As per this recommendation, both PCV13 and PPV23 should be routinely Administer in series to all adults aged 65 years. ACIP recommendations for use of PCV13 in adults aged 19 years with immunocompromising conditions, functional or anatomic asplenia, cerebrospinal fluid leak, or cochlear implants remain unchanged. Recommendations for usage of both vaccines are mentioned in Table 9. The ACIP recommendation was amended in 2015 to simplify spacing between PCV13 and PPSV23 in adults > 65 years. Old ACIP recommend that PPSV23 can be given after 6-12 months after PCV13. The new recommendation states that recommend interval for adults receiving PCV13 and PPV23 to be at least 1 year apart, regardless of sequence. In Summary, this means that PCV13 is given first, followed by PPSV23 with spacing at least 1 year. If an adult above 65 years receives PPSV23, he will receive PCV13 after 1 year as older recommendation.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Influenza vaccine

The Available Vaccine in India is kill virus Vaccine to be given intramuscularly. Other vaccines include nasal spray vaccines. As influenza viruses constantly mutate, new batches are prepared every year. Vaccine becomes effective against influenza virus 2 weeks after administration. Since peak influenza season begins in October and lasts till May, October-November are the best times to receive vaccination. Single Dose of inactivated flu Vaccine in Dose of 0. 5 mL is given intramuscularly into deltoid muscle. Vaccination is indicated in high-risk subjects, eg, those with COPD, CKD, cardiac or lung diseases, hepatic, metabolic diseases, hematological diseases, pregnancy, nursing homes, health care personnel, household contacts of children < 5 years or adults > 50 years, diseases which impair respiratory functions, and immunosuppressed individuals. Side effects include allergic reactions, Guillain Barre syndrome. High-risk individuals should not receive nasal spray live flu Vaccine. Vaccine provides adequate protection against HINI infection. Antibody monitoring is not require.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Pre-exposure schedule

The Pre-exposure schedule for Rabies vaccination is 3 doses at days 0 7, and 28 and is recommended for high-risk groups such as veterinarians, laboratory personnel working with Rabies virus, medical and paramedical personnel treating Rabies patients, dog catchers, forest staff, zookeepers, postmen, policemen, courier boys, and schoolchildren in endemic countries. Human diploid cell culture vaccine and purified chick embryo cell culture PCECV or purified vero cell Rabies vaccine are administered by intramuscular route in the deltoid region or anterolateral thigh. Reconstituted tissue culture vaccines can be administered by intradermal route over deltoid region. Antibody titers should be monitored every 6 months in people working with live viruses in diagnostic, research, and vaccine production laboratories. In other professions at permanent risk of exposure to rabies, such as veterinarians, animal handlers, and wildlife officers, antibody titers in serum should be monitored annually. Booster dose should be administered when titer falls below 0. 5 IU / mL. Duration of immunity by two injection vaccination course is 2-3 years.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Postexposure prophylaxis

This report summarizes new recommendations and updates previous recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices for postexposure prophylaxis to prevent human rabies. Previously, ACIP recommended a 5-dose rabies vaccination regimen with human diploid cell vaccine or purified chick embryo cell vaccine. These new recommendations reduce the number of vaccine doses to four. The reduction in doses recommended for PEP was based in part on evidence from rabies virus pathogenesis data, experimental animal work, clinical studies, and epidemiologic surveillance. These studies indicate that 4 vaccine doses in combination with rabies immune globulin elicit adequate immune responses and that the five doses of vaccine do not contribute to more favorable outcomes. For persons previously unvaccinated with the rabies vaccine, reduced regimen of 4 1-mL doses of HDCV or PCECV should be administered intramuscularly. The first dose of the 4-dose course should be administered as soon as possible after exposure. Additional doses then should be administered on days 3, 7, and 14 after first vaccination. ACIP recommendations for use of RIG remain unchanged. For persons who previously received complete vaccination series with cell-culture vaccine or who previously had documented adequate rabies virus-neutralizing antibody titer following vaccination with noncell-culture vaccine, recommendation for 2-dose PEP vaccination series has not change. Similarly, number of doses recommended for persons with altered immunocompetence has not change; for such persons, PEP should continue to comprise a 5-dose vaccination regimen with 1 dose of RIG. Recommendations for pre-exposure prophylaxis also remain unchanged, with 3 doses of vaccine administered on days 0 7, and 21 or 28. Prompt rabies PEP combining wound care, infiltration of RIG into and around wound, and multiple doses of rabies cell-culture vaccine continue to be highly effective in preventing human rabies.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Management of re-exposure

The CDC recommends two doses of measles-containing vaccine routinely for children, starting with first dose at age 12 through 15 months and second dose at age 4 through 6 years before school entry. This can be administered as MMR or MMRV Vaccine. Children can receive a second dose of MMR Vaccine earlier than 4 to 6 years, as long as it is at least 28 days after the first dose. Second dose of MMRV Vaccine can be given 3 months after the first dose up to 12 years of age. Adults should also be up to date on MMR vaccinations with either 1 or 2 doses unless they have other presumptive evidence of immunity to measles, mumps, and rubella. One dose of MMR Vaccine, or other presumptive evidence of immunity, is sufficient for most adults. Providers generally do not need to actively screen adult patients for measles immunity in non-outbreak areas in the US. After vaccination, it is also not necessary to test patients for antibodies to confirm immunity. There is no recommendation for catch-up Program among adults for second dose of MMR. Students at post-high school educational institutions WHO do not have presumptive evidence of immunity should receive two doses of MMR Vaccine, each dose separate by at least 28 days. Persons aged 6 months and older WHO will be traveling internationally to any country outside the United States WHO do not have presumptive evidence of immunity should be vaccinated with measles-containing Vaccine if they are not already protected against measles, mumps, and rubella. Before any international travel, infants from 6 through 11 months of age should receive one dose of MMR Vaccine. Infants WHO get one dose of MMR Vaccine before their first birthday should get two more doses according to the routinely recommended schedule. Persons 12 months of age and older should receive two doses of measles-containing Vaccine, separate by at least 28 days, unless they have other presumptive evidence of immunity against measles. Healthcare personnel without presumptive evidence of immunity should get two doses of MMR Vaccine, separate by at least 28 days. Although birth before 1957 is considered acceptable evidence of immunity, in routine circumstances, healthcare facilities should consider vaccinating healthcare personnel born before 1957 WHO lack laboratory evidence of immunity or laboratory confirmation of disease. People with compromised immune systems are at high risk for severe complications if infected with measles. All family and other close contacts of people with compromised immune systems 12 months of age and older should receive two doses of MMR Vaccine separate by 28 days, unless they have other presumptive evidence of measles immunity. People 12 months of age and older with HIV infection WHO do not have presumptive evidence of measles immunity or evidence of severe immunosuppression should receive two doses of MMR Vaccine, separate by 28 days.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis vaccine

Summary of DTaP and Tdap Vaccine Recommendations across the Lifespan

Age/StatusRecommendations
Birth through 6 yearsCDC routinely recommends DTaP at 2, 4, and 6 months, at 15 through 18 months, and at 4 through 6 years.
7 through 10 yearsCDC routinely recommends Tdap for children ages 7 through 10 years who are not fully vaccinated ( see note 1 ) against pertussis: Single dose of Tdap for those not fully vaccinated ( see note 1 ) or If additional doses of tetanus and diphtheria toxoid-containing vaccines are needed, then children aged 7 through 10 years should be vaccinated according to the catch-up schedule , with Tdap preferred as the first dose. UPDATED JAN 2011
11 through 18 yearsCDC routinely recommends Tdap as a single dose for those 11 through 18 years of age with preferred administration at 11 through 12 years of age. If an adolescent was not fully vaccinated ( see note 1 ) as a child, check the ACIP recommendations and catch-up schedule to determine whats indicated. If adolescents (13 through 18 years) missed getting Tdap at 11 to 12 years of age, administer at the next patient encounter or sooner if adolescent will have close contact with infants.
19 years or olderAny adult 19 years of age or older who has never received a dose of Tdap should get one as soon as feasible. You should administer Tdap regardless of interval since the last tetanus or diphtheria toxoid-containing vaccine. This should be followed by either a Td or Tdap shot every 10 years. When feasible, Boostrix (GSK) should be used for adults 65 years and older; however, either vaccine product administered to a person 65 years or older provides protection and may be considered valid. You should not miss an opportunity to vaccinate persons aged 65 years or older with Tdap. Therefore, you may administer the Tdap vaccine you have available. UPDATED JAN 2020
Pregnant womenPregnant women should get a dose of Tdap during each pregnancy, preferably during the early part of gestation weeks 27 through 36. By getting Tdap during pregnancy, maternal pertussis antibodies transfer to the newborn, providing protection against pertussis in early life, before the baby starts getting DTaP vaccines. Tdap will also help protect the mother at time of delivery, making her less likely to transmit pertussis to her infant. CDC only recommends Tdap in the immediate postpartum period before discharge from the hospital or birthing center for new mothers who have never received Tdap before or whose vaccination status is unknown. UPDATED AUG 2013
Healthcare personnel ( see note 2 )CDC recommends a single dose of Tdap for healthcare personnel who have not previously received Tdap and who have direct patient contact. Tdap vaccination can help protect healthcare personnel against pertussis and help prevent them from spreading it to their patients. Give priority to vaccinating those who have direct contact with babies younger than 12 months of age. You should administer Tdap regardless of interval since the previous Td dose. However, shorter intervals between Tdap and last Td may increase the risk of mild local reactogenicity. For additional guidance, see Evaluating Revaccination of Healthcare Personnel . UPDATED JUN 2015

Tdap is only for children 7 years and older, adolescents, and adults. Adolescents should receive a single dose of Tdap, preferably at age 11 or 12 years. Pregnant women should get a dose of Tdap during every pregnancy, to protect newborn from pertussis. Infants are most at risk for severe, life-threatening complications from pertussis. Adults who have never received Tdap should get dose of Tdap. Also, adults should receive booster dose every 10 years, or earlier in case of severe and dirty wound or burn. Booster doses can be either Tdap or Td. Tdap may be given at the same time as other vaccines. Allergic reactions could occur after a vaccinated person leaves the clinic. If you see signs of severe allergic reaction, call 9-11 and get person to the nearest hospital. For other signs that concern you, call your health care provider. Adverse reactions should be reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Your health care provider will usually file this report, or you can do it yourself. Visit VAERS website external icon or call 1-800-822-7967. VAERS is only for reporting reactions, and VAERS staff do not give medical advice.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Precautions

ACIP Recommendations For Vaccines that Might Be indicate For Adults 19 years Of Age and Older based on Medical, Occupational, and Lifestyle Risks. These Recommendations should be read with footnotes, which contain number of doses, intervals between doses, and other important information. Footnotes are available at http: / tinyurl. Com / AdultImmunizations2016. B Three doses post-HSCT recipients only this schedule indicate recommend Medical indications For which administration of currently licensed Vaccines is commonly recommended for adults 19 years of age and older as of February 2016. For all Vaccines being recommended on this schedule, Vaccine series do not need to be restart, regardless of time that has elapsed between doses. License combination Vaccines may be used whenever any components of combination are indicated and when Vaccines other components are not contraindicate. The above Recommendations should be read with footnotes, which are available at http: / tinyurl.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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