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Age of Bronze (comics)

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Last Updated: 18 January 2022

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General | Latest Info

Age of Bronze (comics)

Publication information
PublisherImage Comics
No. of issues34 (as of April 2019)
Creative team
Created byEric Shanower
Written byEric Shanower
Artist(s)Eric Shanower
Collected editions
A Thousand ShipsISBN 1-58240-200-0
SacrificeISBN 1582403600
Betrayal, Part OneISBN 9781582408453
Betrayal, Part TwoISBN 9781607067573

Age Of Bronze is a Comic Series by Writer / Artist Eric Shanower retelling the legend of the Trojan War. It began in 1998 and is published by Image Comics. The series aims to be true to all literary traditions, from Homer's Iliad to Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida, as well as the archaeology of Bronze Age Aegean. When completed, it is a project to comprise seven volumes. 26 issues, Two graphic novel collections and two specials have been published to date. Volume 1: Thousand Ships collect issues 1 to 9, in which Helen, wife of the king Of Sparta, is abducted by Trojan prince Paris, and the Greeks gather their armies for War in response. Volume 2: Sacrifice collects issues 10 to 19, in which progress of the Greek army is held up, until their king, Agamemnon, pays the debt he owes to the gods. Volume 3: Betrayal, is currently being serialise. Age Of Bronze Special, published in 1999, provides backstory, telling of curse on Atreus and his sons, Agamemnon and Menelaus. Age Of Bronze: Behind Scenes, published in 2002, gives insight into Shanower's research and working methods. Shanower won Eisner Award for Best Writer / Artist in 2001 and 2003, and was nominated for an Ignatz Award for outstanding Artist in 1999, for his work on Age Of Bronze. The series was also nominated for the RAC squiddy Award for Best Ongoing COMIC Series in 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2002.

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* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Examples:

Bronze Age of Comic Books is the informal name for a period in the history of American superhero comic books, usually said to run from 1970 to 1984. It follows the Silver Age of Comic Books and is followed by the Modern Age of Comic Books. The Bronze Age retains many of the conventions of the Silver Age, with traditional superhero titles remaining mainstay of the industry. However, return of darker plot elements and storylines more related to relevant social issues, such as racism, begin to flourish during the Period, prefiguring later Modern Age of Comic Books. There is no one single event that can be said to herald the beginning of the Bronze Age. Instead, number of events at the beginning of the 1970s, taken together, can be seen as shifting away from the tone of comics in previous decade. One such event was the April 1970 issue of Green Lantern, which added Green Arrow as the title character. The series, written by Denny o'neil and pencilled by Neal Adams, focuses on relevance as Green Lantern was exposed to poverty and experiencing self-doubt. Later in 1970, Jack Kirby left Marvel Comics, ending arguably the most important creative partnership of the Silver Age. Kirby then came to DC, where he created the Fourth World series of titles starting with Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen 133 in December 1970. Also in 1970, Mort Weisinger, long term Editor of various Superman titles, retired to be replaced by Julius Schwartz. Schwartz set about toning down some of the more fanciful aspects of the Weisinger Era, removing Most Kryptonite from continuity and scaling back Superman's nigh-infiniteby thenpowers, which was done by veteran Superman artist Curt Swan together with groundbreaking author Denny o'neil. The beginning of the Bronze Age coincides with the end of careers of many of the veteran writers and Artists of Time, or their promotion to management positions and retirement from regular writing or drawing, and their replacement with younger generation of editors and creators, many of whom knew each other from their experiences in Comic book fan conventions and publications. At the same time, publishers begin Era by scaling back on their Super-Hero publications, canceling many of weaker-selling titles, and experimenting with other genres such as horror and Sword-and-sorcery. Era also encompasses major changes in distribution of and audience for Comic Books. Over time, media shifted from cheap mass market products sold at newsstands to more expensive products sold at specialty Comic book shops and aimed at a smaller, core audience of fans. The shift in distribution allows many small-print publishers to enter the market, changing medium from one dominated by a few large publishers to a more diverse and eclectic range of books. In 1970, Marvel published the first Comic book issue of Robert E. Howard's pulp character Conan Barbarian. Conan's success as a Comic Hero resulted in adaptations of other Howard Characters: King Kull, Red Sonja, and Solomon Kane.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

The story so far

The Shanowers project is ambitious, with project seven volumes necessary to tell all OF tale. The first Volume, Thousand Ships, appeared in 2001. It starts off with the story of Paris. He is sent by his father, Priam, King OF Troy, to Greece, where he meets and falls in love with Helen, wife OF Menelaus, King OF Sparta. When he abducts Helen, Menelaus asks his brother Agamemnon for aid to go and get Helen back. Agamemnon musters the largest army that the world has ever seen and, at the very end OF book, Thousand Ships OF Greek army set sail for Troy. Volume 2, SACRIFICE, sees Greeks arrive at a place that Achilles believed was Troy. He and his men proceed to attack natives, but are later told by Agamemnon that they had made a mistake. They are actually in the region of Mysia. They manage to placate local people and then return to Greece. There, fleet gathers anew at Aulis, but unfavourable winds prevent them from leaving. Only if Agamemnon sacrifices his daughter Iphigenia will the gods be placated and the fleet be allowed to leave. Initially, Agamemnon refuses, but is eventually convinced by his men to acquiesce. He lure Iphigenia to Aulis, where she is kill. Favourable winds do indeed return and the Greeks once again set sail for Troy. The third Volume, BETRAYAL, was published in two parts. In the first part, Agamemnon sends envoys to Troy and various smaller events happen, such as Philoktetes getting bitten by a snake. In the second part, Greeks finally arrive at Troy and much of the book is filled with some well-execute battle scenes. OF course, weve now only reached the first stage in a war that will not be won until the tenth year. In other words, there is ample material leave for SHANOWER to fill the remaining four volumes.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Comments and criticism

Drawing comparison to the archaeological period of discovery that gave us metalworking, author Paul Levitz sees the Bronze Age of DC Comics as a time in comics full of discovery of creative tools that would come to full fruition and proceeds to qualify this notion with over 400 XXL pages of comic covers, interior art and profiles of noteworthy DC artists and writers. You don't need to be a hardcore DC fan to appreciate changes that Comics underwent during this period, or how those influential creators at DC would come to shape Comics of today. The period under excavation was from 1970 to 1984. During this time, comic covers have become more daring in language and sophisticated in composition, signalling a shift in direction steered by a new generation of artists and writers searching for a more elevated platform from which to address social issues and create more mature storylines. In the opening pages, Paul interviews one such erudite hippie, writer and editor Dennis o'neil. Dennis recalls how DC management complained about long-haired delivery boys loitering in offices, unaware that they were actually new writers Steve Skeates and Dennis himself. Almost every other page of this book has large, if not full-bleed, examples of cover and page art, scaled up 20 per cent from its original size. With increase in size comes a heightened sense of nostalgia. There's something evocative about those printing dots being even more apparent-couple with that new-print smell-that transport you back to pouring over every panel of that Batman comic which gets you hooked in the first place. In the later half of the book we begin to see evidence of DC's growth as a publisher. Style guides are implement; printing moves from large letterpresses to offset, which visibly improves reproduction quality; and creative merchandising and licensing begins to shape business. Richard Donner's 1978 Superman film also received justifiable coverage here, with archival photography from on and off set. We find out that the Man of Steel movie swooped in just in time to save DC Comics from the crippling DC Implosion of 1978. The book closes with the introduction of two comic luminaries that would change DC, and comics, forever: Alan Moore and Frank Miller. Like all good final prequel stories, Bronze Age of DC Comics ends here, setting us up nicely for more stories to come.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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