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Age Of Covid Deaths

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Last Updated: 02 July 2021

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General | Latest Info

As of October 15, 216 025 deaths from Coronavirus Disease 2019 have been reported in the United States *; however, this number might underestimate the total impact of the pandemic on mortality. Measures of excess deaths have been used to estimate the impact of public health pandemics or disasters, particularly when there are questions about underascertainment of deaths directly attributable to event or cause. Excess deaths are defined as the number of people who have died from all causes, in excess of the expected number of deaths due to place and time. This report describes trends and demographic patterns in excess deaths during January 26 - October 3 2020. Expect numbers of deaths were estimated using overdispersed Poisson regression models with spline terms to account for seasonal patterns, using Provisional mortality data from CDCs National Vital Statistics System. Weekly numbers of deaths by age group and race / ethnicity were assessed to examine the difference between the weekly number of deaths occurring in 2020 and the average number occurring in the same week during 2015 - 2019 and percentage change in 2020. Overall, estimated 299 028 excess deaths have occurred in the United States from late January through October 3 2020, with two thirds of these attributed to COVID - 19. The largest percentage increases were seen among adults aged 25 - 44 years and among Hispanic or Latino people. These results provide information about the degree to which COVID - 19 deaths might be underascertained and inform efforts to prevent mortality directly or indirectly associated with COVID - 19 pandemic, such as efforts to minimize disruptions to health care. Estimates of excess deaths can provide a comprehensive account of mortality related to the COVID - 19 pandemic, including deaths that are directly or indirectly attributable to COVID - 19. Estimates of numbers of deaths directly attributable to COVID - 19 might be limited by factors such as availability and use of diagnostic testing and accurate and complete reporting of cause of Death information on death certificate. Excess Death analyses are not subject to these limitations because they examine historical trends in all - cause mortality to determine the degree to which observed numbers of deaths differ from historical norms. In April 2020, CDCs National Center for Health Statistics will begin publishing data on excess deaths associated with the COVID - 19 pandemic. This report describes trends and demographic patterns in the number of excess deaths occurring in the United States from January 26 2020, through October 3 2020, and differences by age and race / ethnicity using Provisional mortality data from NVSS. Excess deaths are typically defined as the number of people who have died from all causes, in excess of the expected number of deaths for give place and time. A detailed description of the methodology for estimating excess deaths has been described previously. Briefly, expected numbers of deaths are estimated using overdispersed Poisson regression models with spline terms to account for seasonal patterns. Average expect number, as well as upper bound of 95% prediction interval, are used as thresholds to determine the number of excess deaths and percentage excess.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

State and County Data Files

All data reports below are Update as they become available. Total COVID - 19 cases and Deaths by county, race and ethnicity PDF Current and past Data tables, Updated daily totals of all reported COVID - 19 cases for 2020, including those in Long - term care facilities. The Numbers in this table are Provisional. County case numbers and deaths may change as investigations find new or additional information. The data provided below is the most current available. Mississippi investigates and reports both probable and confirmed cases and deaths according to CSTE case definition. Confirm cases and deaths are generally determined by positive PCR tests, which detect presence of ongoing coronavirus infection. Probable cases are those who test positive by other testing methods such as antibody or antigen, and have recent symptoms consistent with COVID - 19, indicating recent infection. Probable Deaths are those individuals with designation of COVID - 19 as cause of Death on Death certificate, but where no confirmatory testing was perform. This table of death counts compares COVID - 19 Deaths in Mississippi by Week with Deaths from other major causes, including contributing and underlying causes. Mississippi Provisional Death Counts by Week Updated weekly Mississippi K - 12 schools make weekly reports of cases among students, teachers and staff, number of outbreaks, and teachers and students under quarantine as result of COVID - 19 exposure. An Outbreak in a school setting is defined as 3 or more individuals diagnosed with COVID - 19 in the same group within a 14 - day period. K - 12 reports of COVID - 19 school cases, outbreaks and exposure are updated weekly. Long - term care facilities like Nursing Homes are considered high risk locations because their residents are older or in poor health. A Single confirmed COVID - 19 infection in LTC Facility resident,ss or more than one infection in employees or staff in a 14 - day period constitutes an outbreak. Residential care facilities also represent group living facilities where COVID - 19 can be easily spread. We investigate residents, staff and close contacts of infected individuals for possible exposure. These outbreak figures are reported directly to MSDH by Facility. Many of cases and deaths reported by facilities may not yet be included in our totals of lab - report cases. Mississippi COVID - 19 cases and Deaths in Long - term care facilities PDF Long - term care facilities include Nursing Homes, personal care Homes, assist Living Homes, and intermediate care facilities for individuals with intellectual disability Mississippi COVID - 19 cases and Deaths in Residential care facilities PDF Residential care facilities include psychiatric or chemical dependency Residential treatment Centers and Long - term acute care facilities. Because Nursing Homes report COVID - 19 Data directly to Centers for Medicare and Medicaid, we have replaced our usual Long - term care Facility report with the most recent CMS Nursing Home Data, avoiding duplicate reporting requirements for these facilities. Data such as illness of residents and staff, deaths of residents, as well as a number of other data elements are now publicly available on the CMS website. Msdh is providing following links to view this data, which is reported directly by Nursing Homes and is Update daily.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Discussion

We use newly available public data on COVID - 19 deaths to analyze patterns of age - specific mortality by race / ethnicity. The main study finding is excess risk of COVID - 19 Death at all ages in NHB, NHAIAN, and NHAPI populations as compared to the NHW population. Disparities were particularly extreme at younger ages. We additionally go beyond computation and comparison of age - specific mortality rates to assess the differential burden of COVID - 19 Mortality in relation to both premature mortality and YPLL. The impact of lives prematurely cut short can be measured in the absolute number of YPLL. For both the NHB and Hispanic populations, this loss is much larger than for the NHW populationdespite fact that the NHW population is largerwith ratio of 4. 6: 1 and 3. 2: 1, respectively, for NHB and Hispanic populations. Poor quality of NHAIAN mortality and population data likely mean estimated excesses are underestimates. Although for all groups, by far, the majority of deaths occur above the age of 65 years, premature deaths deprive people of their anticipated life expectancy. As a consequence, NHB and Hispanic populations lose nearly 7 times and the NHAIAN population nearly 9 times as many years of life before the age of 65 as the NHW population. Examination of age - specific mortality rates, and not simply counts of deaths or crude comparisons of racial / ethnic composition of COVID - 19 deaths to total population, is crucial to revealing racial / ethnic disparities. Age - standardized rates are not sufficient because age standardization, while accounting for different age distributions across racial / ethnic groups, notably obscure magnitude of mortality inequities at younger ages. These COVID - 19 Mortality Rate ratios, 7 - to 9 - fold higher for NHB, NHAIAN, and Hispanic populations, are extreme and reflect the devastating toll COVID - 19 has taken among communities of color. To put these extreme rates in context, in 2017, rate ratios for all - cause Mortality comparing US NHB to NHW populations, by 5 - year groups for persons aged 25 - 29 years up through age 60 - 64 years, range between 1. 3 and 1. 5. Additionally, in 2015, age - Standardized Rate Ratio for premature Death among adults aged 20 - 64 years, comparing US NHB to NHW population, equal 1. 5 for all - cause mortality, and range between 1. 1 to at most 2. 2 for specific causes of mortality, including leading causes of death. To capture the magnitude of racial / ethnic inequities of COVID - 19, age - specific mortality rates for COVID - 19 should be routinely available by race / ethnicity as well as by sex. Grasping the disparate impact of this pandemic requires transparent reporting of not only age - specific rate ratios and rate differences, but also YPLL. Robust evidence documents transgenerational adverse impacts of parental death at younger ages on their children's economic and health trajectories. Our data underscore that COVID - 19 will likely exacerbate these harms. This study has several limitations. NCHS data is based on complete death certificates received by CDC, and thus may lag in capturing the total number of deaths compared to what is reported on state dashboards. However, this lag likely lead to underestimates of YPLL.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Citation

The overall death rate from COVID - 19 has been estimated at 0. 66%, rising sharply to 7. 8% of people aged over 80 and declining to 0. 0016% in children aged 9 and under. 1 Estimates, calculated by researchers in the UK, use aggregate data on cases and deaths in mainland China. Unlike other estimates, however, they adjust for undiagnosed cases and the number of people in each age group of population. The team found that nearly one in five people over 80 infected with COVID - 19 would probably require hospital admission, compared with around 1% of people under 30. They also estimate that the average time between a person displaying symptoms and dying was 17. 8 days, while recovering from disease was estimated to take slightly longer, with patients being discharged from hospital after an average of 22. 6 days. The paper, published in Lancet Infectious Diseases and funded by the UK Medical Research Council, analyse data from 3665 COVID - 19 cases in mainland China to estimate the admission rates among different age groups. It reported that 0. 04% of 10 - 19 year olds would probably require hospital careas would 1. 0% of people in their 20s, 3. 4% of people aged 30 - 39 4. 3% Age 40 - 49 8. 2% Age 50 - 59 11. 8% in their 60s, 16. 6% were in their 70s, and 18. 4% of those over 80.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Introduction

Since its emergence, coronavirus disease 2019 has resulted in pandemic and has produced a huge number of cases worldwide 1. As of May 29 2020, number of confirmed cases in Italy was 382. 3, with 507. 2 in Spain, and 13. 2 in Japan 1. Of those infect, it has been reported that elderly individuals account for a large portion of fatal cases inducing large heterogeneity in age distribution of Mortality 2 3 4. The expected value of mortality is calculated as a product of the number of cases and mortality rate among cases. As background mechanism of heterogeneity of Mortality by Age, association of two epidemiological factors with mortality can be consider: Age - dependency of susceptibility to Infection, which is related to heterogeneity in number of cases, and Age - dependency of severity, which is related to heterogeneity in mortality rate, eg rate of becoming symptomatic, severe, or fatal case among infected individuals. For first factor, high susceptibility to infection will generate a larger number of infections and result in an increase in fatal cases. The possibility of heterogeneity in susceptibility by age was pointed out by analysis of epidemiological data reports from Wuhan, China 4 5 6 and from Iceland 7. For second factor, increase in severity will result in a higher mortality rate and subsequently a rise in the number of fatal cases. This assumption is also reasonable because elder age as well as the existence of comorbidities, which are likely with aging, have been reported as risk factors for severe COVID - 19 infections 8 9 10 11 12 13. Although not yet shown in relation to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, which is causal agent of COVID - 19, presence of Age - dependent enhancement of severity has been suggested in SARS coronavirus by analysis of innate immune responses in BALB / c mouse model 14 15 16. Additionally, it has been suggested that antibody - dependent enhancement can contribute to formation of observed Age - dependency of severity, as suggested in SARS and Middle East respiratory syndrome cases 17 18 19 20 21 22. Interestingly, age distribution of mortality by COVID - 19, is similar between Italy, Japan, and Spain, even though the number of deaths is quite different between between 23 and 24 25. The The number of deaths was 3 in 0 - 9 years old, 0 in 10 - 19 yo, 11 in 20 - 29 yo, 58 in 30 - 39 yo, 257 in 40 - 49 yo, 1 051 in 50 - 59 yo, 3 107 in 60 - 69 yo, and 25 038 in 70 + yo in Italy as of May 13 2020. In Japan, that was 0 in 0 - 9 yo, 0 in 10 - 19 yo, 0 in 20 - 29 yo, 2 in 30 - 39 yo, 8 in 40 - 49 yo, 16 in 50 - 59 yo, 44 in 60 - 69 yo, and 330 in over 70 + yo as of May 7 2020.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Results

Our results show variation of susceptibility among age groups measured by exponent parameters. Can explain age distribution of mortality by COVID - 19. However, age distribution of mortality formed by age - dependency of susceptibility is influenced by the value of R 0, which cannot explain the similarity in age distributions of mortality among Italy, Japan, and Spain. On the other hand, if susceptibility is constant among age groups, impact of R 0 is quite small on age distribution of mortality. Assuming that age - dependency of mortality by COVID - 19 is determined by only age - dependent susceptibility, ie, mortality rate does not depend on age, exponent parameter,s describing variation of susceptibility among age groups for each country, Italy, Japan, and Spain, was estimated as shown in Fig. 4. From difference between R 0 value and country, estimate value largely varied. The impact of reductions in contacts outside of household on the estimated value of was small. Estimate of in Italy, assuming range of R 0 = 2. 4 - 3. 3 27 28 was 15. 0 16. 3, and 16. 9 to 80%, 40%, and no reduction in contacts outside of household. For Japan, estimate assuming R 0 = 1. 7 29 was 4. 2 5. 5, and 6. 1 to 80%, 40%, and no reduction in contacts outside of household. When it comes to Spain, estimate assuming R 0 = 2. 9 30 was 10. 5 11. 7, and 12. 3 to 80%, 40%, and no reduction in contacts outside of household. Estimates of, assuming that mortality by COVID - 19 infections depends on age but the fraction of infections becoming symptomatic does not depend on age, also vary by value of R 0 and by country. Employing the same assumptions of R 0 value, estimate in Italy was 5. 2 5. 9, and 6. 1 to 80%, 40%, and no reduction in contacts outside of household. For Japan, estimate was 0. 0 0. 0, and 0. 0 to 80%, 40%, and no reduction in contacts outside of household. For Spain, estimate was 4. 1 4. 8, and 5. 1 to 80%, 40%, and no reduction in contacts outside of household.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Materials and methods

As of September 21 2020, Coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic had resulted in more than 6 800 000 reported US cases and more than 199 000 associated deaths. * Early in the pandemic, COVID - 19 incidence was highest among older adults. Cdc examined changing age distribution of COVID - 19 pandemic in the United States during May - August by assessing three indicators: COVID - 19 - like illness - related emergency Department visits, positive reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction test results for SARS - CoV - 2, virus that causes COVID - 19, and confirm COVID - 19 cases. Nationwide, median age of COVID - 19 cases declined from 46 years in May to 37 years in July and 38 in August. Similar patterns were seen for COVID - 19 - like illness - related ED visits and positive SARS - CoV - 2 RT - PCR test results in all US Census Regions. During June - August, COVID - 19 incidence was highest in persons aged 20 - 29 years, who account for > 20% of all confirmed cases. The Southern United States experienced regional outbreaks of COVID - 19 in June. In these regions, increases in the percentage of positive SARS - CoV - 2 test results among adults aged 20 - 39 years precede increases among adults aged 60 years by an average of 8. 7 days, suggesting that younger adults likely contributed to community transmission of COVID - 19. Give role of asymptomatic and presymptomatic transmission, strict adherence to community mitigation strategies and personal preventive behaviors by younger adults is needed to help reduce their risk for infection and subsequent transmission of SARS - CoV - 2 to persons at higher risk for severe illness. Cdc examined age trends during May - August for 50 States and the District of Columbia using three indicators: 1 COVID - 19 - like illness - related ED visits; 2 positive SARS - CoV - 2 RT - PCR test results; and 3 confirmed COVID - 19 cases. Covid - 19 - like illness - related ED visits, reported by health facilities to National Syndromic Surveillance Program NSSP, had fever with cough, shortness of breath, or difficulty breathing in chief complaint text or discharge diagnostic code for COVID - 19 and no diagnostic codes for influenza. Analyses of COVID - 19 - like illness - related ED visits were based on ED visit date. Sars - CoV - 2 RT - PCR test results were obtained from COVID - 19 electronic laboratory reporting data submitted by state Health departments in 37 States and, when age was unavailable in state - submit data, from data submitted directly by public Health, commercial, and reference laboratories in 13 States and DC. Data represents number of specimens test, not individual persons who receive testing. Analyses were based on specimen collection date or test order date. * Daily percentage of positive SARS - CoV - 2 test results percent positivity was calculated as the number of positive test results divided by the sum of positive and negative test results. Confirm COVID - 19 cases were identified from individual - level case reports submitted by state health departments; analyses were based on the date the case was reported to CDC. Confirm COVID - 19 cases had positive SARS - CoV - 2 RT - PCR test result. Case data represents individual people, some of whom might have had multiple positive test results. Monthly incidence was calculated using 2018 US Census population estimates. National case count, percentage distributions, and estimated incidence of confirmed COVID - 19 cases were calculated by 10 - year age increments and by month May - August.


Discussion

During June - August, COVID - 19 pandemic in the United States affected a larger proportion of younger people than during January - May 2020. Shift toward younger ages occurred in all four US Census Regions, regardless of changes in incidence during this period, and was reflected in COVID - 19 - like illness - related ED visits, positive SARS - CoV - 2 RT - PCR test results, and confirmed COVID - 19 cases. A similar age shift occurs in Europe, where the median age of COVID - 19 cases declined from 54 years during January - May to 39 years during June - July, during which time persons aged 20 - 29 years constitute the largest proportion of cases. Case and laboratory surveillance are based on consistent availability of diagnostic testing to all segments of the population, and changes in testing across age groups could affect age distribution of positive SARS - CoV - 2 test results and confirmed cases. Although testing availability has varied by place, time, and test provider, it is unlikely that observed age shift results solely from changes in testing availability. First, decline in median age of persons for whom all SARS - CoV - 2 tests were conducted lags behind declines in median age of persons with positive test results and confirmed cases, suggesting that infection patterns drive testing patterns. Second, age distribution of persons for whom all SARS - CoV - 2 tests were conducted shifted toward younger groups from May to June but remained relatively consistent during June - August. Third, percent positivity continued to increase in the face of increased testing volume; this was most evident in HHS Regions 4 and 6 among persons aged 20 - 39 years during early to mid - June. Fourth, median age of persons with COVID - 19 - like illness - related ED visits, which is not dependent on testing availability, shows similar patterns to those of persons with positive test results and confirmed cases. This report provides preliminary evidence that younger adults contribute to community transmission of COVID - 19 to older adults. Across the southern United States in June 2020, increase in SARS - CoV - 2 infection among younger adults preceded an increase among older adults by 4 - 15 days. Similar observations have been reported by the World Health Organization. * Further investigation of community transmission dynamics across age groups to identify factors that might be driving infection among younger adults and subsequent transmission to older adults is warrant. These findings have important clinical and public health implications. First, occupational and behavioral factors might put younger adults at higher risk for exposure to SARS - CoV - 2. Younger adults make up a large proportion of workers in frontline occupations and highly exposed industries, where consistent implementation of prevention strategies might be difficult or not possible. In addition, younger adults might also be less likely to follow community mitigation strategies, such as social distancing and avoiding group gatherings. Second, younger adults, who are more likely to have mild or no symptoms, can unknowingly contribute to presymptomatic or asymptomatic transmission to others, including to persons at higher risk for severe illness. Finally, SARS - CoV - 2 infection is not benign in younger adults, especially among those with underlying medical conditions, who are at risk for hospitalization, severe illness, and death.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Important updates regarding our data

741 891 total child COVID - 19 cases report, and Children represent 10. 9% of all cases Overall rate: 986 cases per 100 000 Children in population 84 319 New child cases reported from 10 / 1 - 10 / 15 13% increase in child cases over 2 weeks Children make up between 5% - 16. 8% of total state tests, and between 3. 5% - 14. 4% of children tested were test positive. Children were 1% - 3. 6% of total reported hospitalizations, and between 0. 5% - 7. 2% of all child COVID - 19 cases resulted in hospitalization. Children were 0% - 0. 27% of all COVID - 19 deaths, and 14 States report zero child deaths in States reporting, 0% - 0. 16% of all child COVID - 19 cases result in death caring for Children with Acute Illness in Ambulatory Care Setting During Public Health Emergency COVID - 19 Testing Guidance AAP News COVID - 19 Collection Pediatrics COVID - 19 Collection

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Significance

Danae Bixler, MD 1; Allison D. Miller, MPH 1; Claire P. Mattison, MPH 1; Burnestine Taylor, MD 2; Kenneth Komatsu, MPH 3; Xandy Peterson Pompa, MPH 3; Steve Moon 4; Ellora Karmarkar, MD 5; Caterina Y. Liu, MD 5; John J. Openshaw, MD 5; Rosalyn E. Plotzker, MD 5; Hilary E. Rosen, MPH 5; Nisha Alden, MPH 6; Breanna Kawasaki, MPH 6; Alan Siniscalchi, MPH, MS 7; Andrea Leapley, MPH 8; Cherie Drenzek, DVM 9; Melissa Tobin - DAngelo, MD 9; Judy Kauerauf, MPH 10; Heather Reid 10; Eric Hawkins, MS 11; Kelly White, MPH 11; Farah Ahmed, PhD 12; Julie Hand, MSPH 13; Gillian Richardson, MPH 13; Theresa Sokol, MPH 13; Seth Eckel, MPH 14; Jim Collins, MPH 14; Stacy Holzbauer, DVM 15; Leslie Kollmann 15; Linnea Larson, MPH 15; Elizabeth Schiffman, MPH 15; Theresa S. Kittle, MPH 16; Kimberly Hertin, MPH 17; Vit Kraushaar, MD 17; Devin Raman, MPH 17; Victoria LeGarde, MPH 18; Lindsey Kinsinger, MPH 18; Melissa Peek - Bullock, MPH 18; Jenna Lifshitz 19; Mojisola Ojo, MPH 19; Robert J Arciuolo, MPH 20; Alexander Davidson, MPH 20; Mary Huynh, PhD 20; Maura K. Lash, MPH 20; Julia Latash, MPH 20; Ellen H. Lee, MD 20; Lan Li, MPH 20; Emily McGibbon, MPH 20; Natasha McIntosh - Beckles 20; Renee Pouchet, MHA 20; Jyotsna S. Ramachandran, MPH 20; Kathleen H. Reilly, PhD 20; Elizabeth Dufort, MD 21; Wendy Pulver, MS 21; Ariela Zamcheck, DO 21; Erica Wilson, MD 22; Sietske de Fijter, MS 23; Ozair Naqvi, MS 24; Kumar Nalluswami, MD 25; Kirsten Waller, MD 25; Linda J. Bell, MD 26; Anna - Kathryn Burch, MD 26; Rachel Radcliffe, DVM 26; Michelle D. Fiscus, MD 27; Adele Lewis, MD 27; Jonathan Kolsin, MPH 28; Stephen Pont, MD 28; Andrea Salinas, MPH 28; Kelsey Sanders, MPH 28; Bree Barbeau, MPH 29; Sandy Althomsons, MHS 1; Sukhshant Atti, MD 30; Jessica S. Brown, PhD 1; Arthur Chang, MD 1; Kevin R. Clarke, MD 1; S. Deblina Datta, MD 1; John Iskander, MD 1; Brooke Leitgeb, MS 1; Talia Pindyck, MD 1; Lalita Priyamvada, PhD 1; Sarah Reagan - Steiner, MD 1; Nigel. Scott, MS 1; Laura J. Viens, MD 1; Jonathan Zhong, MPH 1; Emilia H. Koumans, MD 1; Pediatric Mortality Investigation Team since February 12, 2020, approximately 6. 5 million cases of SARS - CoV - 2 infection, caused by coronavirus disease 2019, and 190 000 SARS - CoV - 2associated deaths have been reported in the United States. Symptoms associated with SARS - CoV - 2 infection are milder in children compared with adults. Persons aged < 21 years constitute 26% of the US population, and this report describes characteristics of US persons in that population who died in association with SARS - CoV - 2 infection, as reported by Public Health jurisdictions. Among 121 SARS - CoV - 2associated deaths reported to CDC among persons aged < 21 years in the United States during February 12 - July 31 2020, 63% occurred in males, 10% of decedents were aged < 1 year, 20% were aged 1 - 9 years, 70% were aged 10 - 20 years, 45% were Hispanic persons, 29% were non - Hispanic Black persons, and 4% were non - Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native persons.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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