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Alzheimer Research

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Last Updated: 15 October 2020

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General | Latest Info

As the most common form of dementia and the sixth - leading cause of death in the US, Alzheimer's Disease is not foreign to Americans. Many in the US know someone battling a disease or disease that doctors are still continuing to understand. While the majority of previous research has been focused on treatment, researchers are beginning to shift their attention toward prevention. In recent virtual presentation in partnership between Alzheimers Associations Michigan chapter and Michigan Alzheimers Disease Research Center, Bruno Giordani, ph. D, professor in departments of psychiatry, neurology and psychology, discussed science behind Alzheimers Disease as well as the latest research from the most recent Alzheimers Association International Conference. According to Giordani, new research findings lead to an entire change in emphasis of research, as more evidence was released to support risk - reducing tactics over later treatment. Alzheimer's Disease involves memory loss, confusion and spatial difficulties, which all come down to the existence of amyloid plaques. Amyloid plaques, or hallmarks of Alzheimer's Disease, as Giordani calls them, are clumps of misshapen proteins that form between nerve cells and essentially act as roadblocks for memory. Cell death also occurs in specific areas of the brain, such as the hippocampus, which is critical for areas of cognition like memory and spatial navigation. Scientists are gaining better understanding of the course of Alzheimer's Disease, which progresses from prodromal or pre - clinical period to mild cognitive impairment and then dementia. Knowledge of this path, as well as earlier tracking of amyloid, has given doctors the chance to work toward risk diagnosis and preventative medications, as opposed to later treatment of disease. Id usually tell YOU about all the exciting new amyloid drugs present at AAIC meeting; amyloid busters that we can apply to get rid of amyloid in the brain. Frankly, these have not worked out as expect, Giordani explain. Researchers are now attempting to disrupt the process even earlier, before amyloid plaques form and begin to disturb memory. In recent discussion with Giordani, he highlighted news that Biogen, American biotechnology company, completed submission to the US Food and Drug Administration for review of aducanumab, investigational treatment for Alzheimer's Disease that targets amyloid in the brain in hopes of reducing its buildup. If approve, aducanumab would become the first therapy to reduce clinical decline of Alzheimer's Disease and would also be the first therapy to demonstrate that removing amyloid beta results in better clinical outcomes, which could be significant news for Alzheimer's treatment. Researchers are also examining how parts of the body, other than the brain, may play a role in disease development. Studies have looked into the effect of various medications individuals are already taking, such as insulin, and are finding promising results. Study looking at inhaled insulin show some cognitive and amyloid - tau distribution improvements, but the type of inhaler seems to make a big difference. Other approaches include studying gingivitis and other markers of inflammation, which Giordani says may help track disease process earlier on as well.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

ADRC Directory

The National Institute on Aging funds Alzheimers Disease Research Centers at major medical institutions across the United States. Researchers at these Centers are working to translate research advances into improved diagnosis and care for people with Alzheimer's Disease and related dementias, as well as to find ways to treat and possibly prevent these diseases. Nia ADRCs are NIH Centers of Excellence. Establish in 1984, ADRCs were the first of only six such Centers to be mandated by statute. Areas of investigation range from basic mechanisms of disease to managing symptoms and helping families cope with effects. Adrc researchers conduct basic, clinical, translational, and behavioral research and train scientists. Although each Center has its own area of emphasis, ADRCs also enhance research on Alzheimer's Disease as a network that shares new research ideas and approaches as well as data, biological samples and genetic information. The Network also provides infrastructure to facilitate NIA signature programs like ADNI and Alzheimers Clinical Trials Consortium. For patients and families affected by Alzheimer's Disease, ADRCs offer: help with obtaining diagnosis and medical management Information about disease, services, and resources Outreach to include diverse populations in research opportunities, including Clinical Trials and Research registries Support groups and other special programs for volunteers and their families

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Leadership at the Center

Nia - LOAD FBS is led by renowned investigators in the field of LOAD and AD genetics, including: Columbia University; Dr. Richard Mayeux, Senior Principal Investigator, is a neurologist and genetic epidemiologist who brings clinical expertise to this Project. He has assembled multiple, diverse cohorts for the study of LOAD, including Washington Heights - Inwood Columbia Aging Project, collection of families multiplied affected by LOAD from the Dominican Republic, and NIA LOAD FBS cohort. Dr. Mayeux has been involved in numerous studies that include NIA LOAD cohort and has a particular interest in the genetics of LOAD among African Americans and Hispanics. He reviews all projects that include NIA LOAD FBS dataset, reviews all pedigrees for inclusion and frequently reviews pedigrees for expansion, and leads monthly calls for PIs and genetic analyses. Indiana University; Dr. Tatiana Foroud, Co - PI, is statistical geneticist and PI of National Cell Repository for Alzheimer's Disease, which serves as NIA Cooperative agreement banking biospecimens resource for Dementia - Related studies. She is also PI of NINDS U24 for biospecimen banking in Parkinson's Disease, Huntington Disease, and Frontotemporal Dementia. Dr. Foroud has served as NIA - LOAD FBS site Investigator at Indiana University, which has recruited and longitudinally assessed LOAD families and controls. She has been involved in numerous studies involving NIA - LOAD FBS cohort. Indiana University will continue to coordinate biospecimen collection and will train all sites in collection of samples. Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai; Dr. Alison Goate, Co - PI, is a molecular geneticist who has Study AD genetics since 1987, identifying mutations in all of known AD genes, as well as several risk factors genes for LOAD. She plays lead role in many AD genetics consortia including ADGC, GERAD, NIA - LOAD FBS, DIAN and ADSP. She has played an active role in the recruitment of families for NIA - LOAD FBS since its inception in 2003. She is currently PI of several gene Discovery projects for follow - up of GWAS findings and generation of WES / WGS data in NIA - LOAD FBS families. She is Director of the Ronald M. Loeb Center for Alzheimers Disease and Neurodegeneration and Core leader for Genomics Core of ISMMS Alzheimers Disease Research Center. In NIA - LOAD FBS, she leads Genomics Core to coordinate generation and analysis of genomic data for external investigators and for the group of investigators mentioned below. Mayo Clinic; Dr. Brad Boeve is a behavioral neurologist who has an interest in Alzheimer's Disease, as well as non - AD dementias. He is Co - PI of Longitudinal Evaluation of Familial Frontotemporal Dementia Subjects protocol and Co - Director of Clinical Core of Mayo ADRC. Dr. Boeve has served as site - PI for NIA - LOAD FBS at Mayo Clinic Rochester since its inception, through which greater than 500 people have been recruit. He has been involved in numerous studies involving LOAD, early onset AD, and other Familial Neurodegenerative Disorders. He will direct efforts between Rochester and Jacksonville Mayo Clinic programs.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Studying the heart-head connection

In a literary sense, head and heart are often figuratively disconnect. But in a biological sense, there is increasing evidence of a significant link between Alzheimers and Heart Disease. While patients with Heart Failure often present cognitive impairment, there is more to it, explains Federica del Monte, MD, PhD, with Department of Medicine at Medical University of South Carolinas Division of Cardiology. She has been researching Connection in hopes of finding more answers to incurable disease. According to Dr. Del Monte, same pathology that characterizes Alzheimer's Disease - specifically Amyloid plaques in the brain - is also present in the hearts of some patients with primary cardiomyopathy and leads to heart failure. We study hearts of patients with Alzheimer's Disease and find that same plaques, made of the same protein material, deposited in the hearts of those patients, she say. New find connecting link between head and heart is now opening up the realm of possibilities in terms of further research of both diseases. The heart talks to the US; heart gives US numbers; heart has functions that we can measure; it doesnt have a blood / brain barrier, Dr. Del Monte continue. We can study heart easily. We can imagine heart easily. We can access heart with therapies. Since we discovered that the heart and brain are similarly affected by the same biological changes, we can learn more about Alzheimers by studying the heart. Vice versa, we can learn from Alzheimers knowledge about this new defect in the heart. Alzheimers has historically been hard to study in living patients, so this Brain / Heart Connection creates an opportunity to diagnose and identify disease early and monitor its progression and effect of old and new drugs by studying heart in living patients. Current brain tests can be parallel with more accessible cardiac diagnostics. If therapies and research work, molecules could be modified to cross the blood / brain barrier, potentially allowing for both the brain and heart to be target at same time. Heart Failure and Alzheimer's Disease stand out as modern scourges, she say. They are age - dependent diseases and are two of the most devastating illnesses in terms of morbidity, morality, quality of life and health care costs. Heart Failure and Alzheimer's Disease currently affect a cumulative staggering total of 70 million people worldwide. These two conditions, as the world population ages, will evolve into a global epidemic by the year 2050, with more than 200 million people affected by either condition. If Dr. Del Montes Study can identify predictive cardiac signs of development and / or progression of Brain and Heart Disease, family members and caregivers can be trained to recognize early signs and symptoms and get help with prevention and maintenance measures. Alzheimers and heart disease are often hereditary, but there are some factors that can be changed and lead to possible improvement. When it runs in the family, unfortunately, we cannot change gene.S Often though, gene to environment interaction may precipitate disease.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Speeding treatment development

To help meet the urgent need for therapies that will effectively TREAT or prevent Alzheimer's Disease, National Institute on Aging has launched two New Research Centers with funding expected to total more than $73 million over the next five years. The Alzheimer Centers for Discovery of New Medicines awards are designed to diversify and reinvigorate the Alzheimers Disease Drug Development pipeline. Nia is part of the National Institutes of Health. Target Enablement to Accelerate Therapy Development for Alzheimer's Disease Centers will provide added infrastructure for developing high - quality research tools and technologies needed to validate and advance the next generation of Drug targets for Alzheimer's Disease. Data, research methodologies, and computational and experimental tools will be disseminated openly and free - of - charge to the broader research communityincluding, academia and industryfor use in Drug Discovery and in research to better understand the complex biology of disease. Accelerating Medicines Partnership - Alzheimer's Disease programs open - science enterprise, which has provided more than 500 new candidate targets for Alzheimer's Disease, serves as Foundation for New Centers. Through these Centers, NIH will expand the use of open - science and open - source principles to de - risk novel drug targets with the goal of facilitating development of new treatments for Alzheimers, said NIH Director Francis S. Collins, MD, ph. D with a growing aging population, Alzheimer's Disease is among the greatest public health challenges of the 21 century. It affects estimate 5. 6 million people aged 65 and older in the US alone, number that could rise as high as 14 million by 2050 without effective treatment and prevention. There are few current treatments approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, and several recent, late - stage clinical trials testing Disease - modifying Drug candidates have fail. Drug Development for Alzheimer's Disease is a challenging, costly and high - risk endeavor, said NIA Director Richard J. Hodes, MD. The launch of these Centers marks a strategic step forward in our multi - pronged approach to Accelerating Discovery and Development of treatments and cures for Alzheimers.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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