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Americans Have Died From Covid 19

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Last Updated: 02 July 2021

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General | Latest Info

As of October 15, 216 025 deaths from Coronavirus Disease 2019 have been reported in the United States *; however, this number might underestimate the total impact of the pandemic on mortality. Measures of excess deaths have been used to estimate the impact of public health pandemics or disasters, particularly when there are questions about underascertainment of deaths directly attributable to event or cause. Excess deaths are defined as the number of people who have died from all causes, in excess of the expected number of deaths due to place and time. This report describes trends and demographic patterns in excess deaths during January 26 - October 3 2020. Expect numbers of deaths were estimated using overdispersed Poisson regression models with spline terms to account for seasonal patterns, using provisional mortality data from CDCs National Vital Statistics System. Weekly numbers of deaths by age group and race / ethnicity were assessed to examine the difference between the weekly number of deaths occurring in 2020 and the average number occurring in the same week during 2015 - 2019 and percentage change in 2020. Overall, estimated 299 028 excess deaths have occurred in the United States from late January through October 3 2020, with two thirds of these attributed to COVID - 19. The largest percentage increases were seen among adults aged 25 - 44 years and among Hispanic or Latino people. These results provide information about the degree to which COVID - 19 deaths might be underascertained and inform efforts to prevent mortality directly or indirectly associated with COVID - 19 pandemic, such as efforts to minimize disruptions to health care. Estimates of excess deaths can provide a comprehensive account of mortality related to the COVID - 19 pandemic, including deaths that are directly or indirectly attributable to COVID - 19. Estimates of numbers of deaths directly attributable to COVID - 19 might be limited by factors such as availability and use of diagnostic testing and accurate and complete reporting of cause of death information on death certificate. Excess death analyses are not subject to these limitations because they examine historical trends in all - cause mortality to determine the degree to which observed numbers of deaths differ from historical norms. In April 2020, CDCs National Center for Health Statistics will begin publishing data on excess deaths associated with the COVID - 19 pandemic. This report describes trends and demographic patterns in the number of excess deaths occurring in the United States from January 26 2020, through October 3 2020, and differences by age and race / ethnicity using provisional mortality data from NVSS. Excess deaths are typically defined as the number of people who have died from all causes, in excess of the expected number of deaths for give place and time. A detailed description of the methodology for estimating excess deaths has been described previously. Briefly, expected numbers of deaths are estimated using overdispersed Poisson regression models with spline terms to account for seasonal patterns. Average expect number, as well as upper bound of 95% prediction interval, are used as thresholds to determine the number of excess deaths and percentage excess.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Discussion

Black Americans, group that has been hit disproportionately hard by the Coronavirus outbreak, have been paying closer attention to many elements of the outbreak - and discussing it more frequently with other people - Than other US adults, according to a Pew Research Center survey conducted before nationwide protests began over the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Many Americans have been following news about the Coronavirus outbreak very closely, including 50% of Black adults, 46% of White adults and 43% of Hispanic adults, according to a survey, conducted April 20 - 26 2020, as part of the Centers American News Pathways project. But black adults were much more likely than whites and somewhat more likely than Hispanic adults to frequently discuss the COVID - 19 outbreak with other people. Roughly a quarter of Black adults say they discuss it almost all the time, more than twice the 10% of White adults who say the same, and more than 19% of Hispanic adults who say the same. What Black Americans are discussing with others about outbreaks may be influenced by the topics of outbreaks they follow. Of 13 COVID - related topics asked about in the survey, both National and local Black Americans were more likely than White and Hispanic adults to be very closely following most of them. That gap in interest is particularly pronounce between Black and White respondents. At national level, 55% of Black adults say they were very closely following news about the health impact of the COVID - 19 outbreak on people like them, substantially more than 36% of White adults and 43% of Hispanic adults who do so. See also: Black Americans face higher COVID - 19 risks, are more hesitant to trust medical scientists, get vaccinated similarly, About half of Black Americans were very closely following news about the number of COVID - 19 cases and Deaths in the United States, higher than 34% of White adults who say same. And while 47% of Black Americans were very closely following news about the ability of hospitals across the country to treat patients, those numbers dropped to 31% of White and 32% of Hispanic Americans. There are somewhat more modest differences on several national topics. For example, 46% of Black Americans say they were very closely following news regarding advice from national health organizations, compared with 39% of White adults. Additionally, 40% of Black respondents were very closely following news about actions and statements of the federal government, higher than 32% of White adults. There is virtually no difference among three groups when it comes to very closely following news about the economic impact of the outbreak. There are more gaps when it comes to local Coronavirus topics. Black respondents were more likely than those in other two racial and ethnic groups to keep a very close eye on all seven topic areas asked about. About half of Black adults were very closely following local news about the availability of COVID - 19 tests, nearly twice the share of White adults and higher than 31% of Hispanic adults.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

HOW TO EXAMINE THE DATA:

Charts which simply show change in confirmed deaths over time are not very useful to answer the question of how the speed of outbreaks compares between different countries. This is because outbreaks of COVID - 19 do not begin at the same time in all countries. The trajectory for each country begins on the day when that country has 5 confirmed deaths. This allows you to compare how rapidly the number of confirmed deaths increases after an outbreak reaches similar stage in each country. Previous charts look at increase in total confirmed deaths - this chart shows the number of confirmed deaths per day. This trajectory chart shows whether countries have made progress in bringing down the curve of new deaths. To allow comparisons between countries, trajectory for each country begins on the day when that country first reports 5 daily deaths. By default, this chart is shown on logarithmic vertical axis. We explain why in the next section. If you are not familiar with logarithmic axes, we recommend you also look at this chart on linear axis. Visual representation on these different axes can look very different. Simply looking at the total or daily number of confirmed deaths does not allow the US to understand or compare the speed at which the toll is rising. The table here shows how long it has taken for the number of deaths to double in each country for which we have data. The table also shows the total number of confirmed deaths, and the number of daily new confirmed deaths, and how those numbers have changed over the last 14 days. In this document and many embed and link charts, we report and visualize data from the European Center for Disease Prevention and Control. 2 We make data used in our charts and tables downloadable as complete and structured. Csv file here. The European CDC publishes daily statistics on the COVID - 19 pandemic. Not just for Europe, but for the entire world. We rely on ECDC as they collect and harmonize data from around the world, which allows the US to compare what is happening in different countries. European CDC Data provides global perspective on evolving pandemic. The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control ECDC provides three statistical resources on COVID - 19 pandemic: ECDC makes all their data available in daily updated clean downloadable file. This get updated daily reflecting data collected up to 6: 00 and 10: 00 CET. The European CDC collects and aggregates data from countries around the world. Most up - to - date data for any particular country is therefore typically available earlier via National Health agencies than via ECDC. This lag between nationally available data and ECDC Data is not very long as ECDC publishes New Data daily. But it can be several hours.


Monday, October 19

10: 43 am: CapRadio and Valley Vision's latest Poll find COVID - 19 is still a major concern for Sacramentans CapRadio teamed up with Valley Vision to conduct the second entry in our Sacramento COVID - 19 Impact and Resiliency Poll. In May, results suggest that residents experience pandemics differently, depending on their racial, ethnic, and economic backgrounds, so Valley Vision wants to get another update on those numbers. Depending on political party, respondents either had their views change a lot or little from recent events like protests against police brutality and COVID - 19 Concerns about safety during pandemic varied based on race and ethnicity. Bipoc residents are generally more concerned about getting infected with coronavirus at their jobs. Men and women's views on childcare during the pandemic vary greatly overwhelming amount of Sacramento residents are feeling stress and anxiety, and many are feeling depressed or hopeless. Concerns about physical and emotional harm remain high, especially for Black residents 10: 29 am: About 110 000 Californians purchased guns during the first five months of pandemic About 110 000 Californians purchased guns during first few months of pandemic, according to CalMatters. A recent survey from UC Davis found that 43% of those purchases were people who did not previously own firearms. Researchers say this increase in gun sales is partly attributable to the pandemic, as it continues to drive up anxiety and depression rates because of the downward economic spiral. These findings come amid a concerned swing upwards in gun violence and homicide rates in cities across the state. Some other significant findings from firearm purchasers in data: 76% were concerned about lawlessness during the pandemic, 49% were worried about the government going too far, 38% feared government collapse. According to another recent survey, about 82% of Californians are concerned that many Americans will not respect the outcome of the general election. 2: 42 pm: US can now test several million people daily for COVID - 19, but states may not report all infections. The US can now test several million people daily for COVID - 19, but the boom comes with a new challenge: keeping track of results, according to Associated Press. While testing sites are legally required to report their results to public health agencies, state health officials say results from any rapid tests go unreported. This could mean that some coronavirus infections may not be count. Experts say with undercounting, situation could get worse. The government is shipping 100 million of the latest rapid tests for use in public schools, assisting living centers and other new testing sites with little training or staffing to report results. 2: 34 pm: Changes coming to indoor ski lodges at Tahoe Ski Resort. Skiers can expect to see a variety of changes indoors ski lodges because of COVID - 19, according to Associated Press. Resorts are setting up capacity limits and some reservation systems. The entire act of skiing and snowboarding outside wo change much, considering that people generally wear masks, gloves, and naturally social distance while speeding down slopes.


Thursday, October 8

Trick - or - treating has been cancelled this year at Nevada governors mansion due to the pandemic, according to the Associated Press. Nevada state health officials are advising people celebrating Halloween and Dia de Los Muertos to avoid any large gatherings. While the governor's mansion will be decorate, Gov. Steve Sisolak said on Wednesday that annual festivities wont happen. State note that costume masks do not count as face coverings and issued advisories against door - to - door visits. A new $20 million grant program was announced to help small businesses with less than 50 employees in other virus - related developments. And 700 fans will also be allowed to sit and watch USL soccer game on Saturday in Reno. 1: 19 pm: Health officials are encouraging people to get flu shots by the end of October. Flu shots protect against seasonal influenza, not coronavirus, but avoiding flu is critical this year, according to the Associated Press. Health officials are encouraging people to get their flu shot or nasal spray by the end of October so doctors and hospitals do face extra strain having to treat additional flu patients in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic. Illnesses have very similar early symptoms, and both require tests to tease them apart and receive correct treatment. Flaw studies over years have attempted to link Flu vaccine to incr 11: 15 am: US warns Nevada to not use Chinese COVID tests from United Arab Emirates US diplomats and security officials privately warned the state of Nevada not to use donated coronavirus test kits, according to documents obtained by Associated Press. These kits were produced by the world's largest genetic sequencing, BGI Group. Tests were donated by a company from the UAE that partners with a Chinese firm. US officials raise concerns about China obtaining private information from those tests with their kits. Nevada ultimately never uses any of the donated 250 000 test kits. Bgi says it is not linked to the Chinese government and does not obtain private information from tests in the US 11: 02 am: Kamala Harris temporarily suspending travel after staffers test positive for coronavirus Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris is suspending her in - person events until Monday after two people associated with campaign test positive for coronavirus. Joe Biden's campaign said on Thursday that he had no exposure, though he and Harris spent several hours together campaigning in Arizona on Oct. 8. Both Biden and Harris have had multiple negative COVID - 19 tests since then. Harris had initially been scheduled to travel Thursday to North Carolina and Friday to Ohio. On Thursday morning, campaign told reporters that Harris communications Director and flight crew member tested positive after a recent trip.


Friday, October 2

1: 54 pm: Nevada's Lyon County allows brothels to provide escort services while brothels in Nevada remain closed under state restrictions due to the coronavirus pandemic, Rural Lyon County is allowing brothels to offer non - sexual escort services, according to Associated Press. The Lyon County Board of Commissioners approved new authorization for four brothels in the county on Oct. 15, according to reporting from the Reno Gazette - Journal. Because brothels must remain closed, sex workers must meet customers elsewhere for escort services authorized under the new ordinance. Brothel owner Suzette Cole told the Board that over 500 people were unemployed due to brothel closings. The Las Vegas Raiders ' latest batch of COVID - 19 tests all came back negative, according to the Associated Press. This allows their scheduled game against Tampa Bay on Sunday to stay on for now. The Raiders recently placed two players on the COVID - 19 list following positive tests earlier in the week, and put five more players on the list because of high risk close contacts. A person familiar with tests said on condition of anonymity that all players test negative in their latest results. Person spoke on condition of anonymity because the league does n't release test results. 9: 41 am: New California unemployment claims fall to lowest in pandemic The latest California unemployment report shows that new unemployment claims fell to their lowest levels since the state started shutting down in March due to the coronavirus pandemic, according to Mercury News. Last week, Californians filed 158 900 first - time unemployment claims, down from about 17 200 from previous week. As business restrictions ease, unemployment claims may continue to fall over coming weeks. Despite the drop in claims, state still facing slow job growth. In September, national jobless rate was 7. 9%, while California's rate was 11%. Across the country, new unemployment claims also dropped to their lowest levels since mid - March. Nationally, 787 000 new claims were filed for the week ending on Oct. 17, around 55 000 less than from previous week. In California, claims fell to its lowest week since Mar. 21, when 186 300 jobless claims were filed statewide. By Mar. 28, more than 1 million first - time claims were filed in the state, breaking a record for single week total. Earlier in the year before the pandemic hit, unemployment claims were about 44 800 a week. 9: 32 am: LA County officials announce elementary schools can apply to reopen without union support Los Angeles County officials have lessen barriers for elementary schools to reopen with waivers by dropping the requirement to get letters of support from unions and parents, according to the Los Angeles Times. The decision to drop these requirements is likely to raise concerns among teachers and other faculty members about possible exposure to coronavirus. This new policy move was announced the day after LA County greenlit school campuses to bring on up to 25% of their enrollment to serve students with special needs, students with disabilities, and students WHO are learning English.


Wednesday, September 30

The US government is drafting a plan on how to make future COVID - 19 vaccines free to all Americans. At the same time, top government health officials are being asked to answer about any political interference in government scientific information. Associated Press reports that there may be an accompanying playbook for different localities and states. 5: 10 pm: California says college virus cases part of community spread California officials say the state won't consider removing college students ' virus cases from countys data because they are part of the community and can contribute to the spread of illness. The issue arises as San Diego County has seen more than 700 cases among college students and others that have helped drive up infections. The county's chief administrative officer has said she would ask the State to exclude San Diego State University cases from its account, but Gov. Gavin Newsom says he's not considering that. While California has seen virus infections slow in recent weeks, San Diego County has recorded a recent increase, which could lead to additional restrictions. Any plans for the Pac - 12 to join the Big Ten in returning to football are on hold due to health policies in two states within the conference. The Big Ten changed course and said it will begin an eight - game football schedule on Oct. 23. The Pac - 12 has also reconsidered starting its football season this fall, but does not have approval from state and local health officials in California and Oregon to start contact practices. On Wednesday, California Gov. Gavin Newsom says state regulations do not prevent college football from starting. There's nothing in our guidelines that prevents these games from occurring, Newsom say. There is nothing in the guidelines saying the Pac - 12 cannot move forward. Pac - 12 has announced a partnership that would give conferences schools capacity to perform daily, rapid COVID - 19 tests on athletes.


Tuesday, September 29

2: 49 pm: Airline workers facing layoffs due to lack of pandemic aid package About 40 000 workers in the airline industry are facing layoffs on Thursday unless Congress comes up with another aid package, according to the Associated Press. Many employees are worried about how theyll pay for basics like food, mortgages, health insurance or rent. The original $25 billion aid package given to airliners at the start of the coronavirus pandemic prevented them from laying off workers, but that clause expires on Thursday. Some airline workers are holding out hope that another agreement can still be reach. While Congress has been considering another round of airline aid for weeks, it has been mixed into debate over a more extensive National relief package. 1: 54 pm: COVID - 19 cases rising amongst children as schools reopen across the country after preying heavily on older adults in spring, coronavirus is infecting a rising number of American children and teens, according to the Associated Press. Authorities say that this trend appears to be driven by school reopenings and resumption of playdates, sports and other activities. An American Academy of Pediatrics report released Tuesday shows children of all ages now make up 10% of all US cases, up from 2% of cases in April. Another new government report says cases of school - age children began rising in September. 1: 41 pm: Pop - up testing site in Elk Grove on Sept. 30 and Oct. 1 California National Guard will be operating community - base COVID - 19 Pop - up testing site at Valley - Hi Library in Elk Grove starting Wednesday. The clinic will be open on September 30 and October 1, with testing beginning at 8 am. All tests will be done on a first - come - first - serve basis until the daily capacity of 100 tests is reach. No appointments are necessary, and there are no prerequisites for testing, such as having symptoms. People interested in getting the test need to be 18 years or older, have a valid ID, and contact information for test results. Results will be provided to residents within 3 - 5 business days after testing. The Sacramento County Public Health lab will be doing all of the coronavirus processing. Future Pop - up sites are plan, and locations will be assessed weekly. Location announcements will be posted on the Sacramento County testing page day before Pop - up. Residents in surrounding communities will also be notified via Next Door, Sacramento County social media, and community partners.


Saturday, September 26

Sacramento Bee is leaving its downtown headquarters at 21 and Q Streets. Paper made an announcement itself online and in Friday's print edition. The building has housed Bee's offices, newsroom and printing press since May of 1952. Departure will be gradual over next year, with printing outsource to vendors in Northern California. At least 200 production employees will lose their jobs when that happen. Bee says most of its reporters work from home in response to the COVID - 19 pandemic and that will continue. When it is safe to do so, paper reports, new newsrooms in smaller, less expensive physical buildings will begin operations.


Thursday, September 24

1: 51 pm: California public health officials can now join the state address protection program. California public health officials will now have the option to make their home address confidential. It is part of an effort to protect these employees from hostile threats related to the COVID - 19 pandemic. The States Safe At Home program was previously reserved for sexual assault and domestic violence survivors, victims of stalking, human trafficking or elder abuse and reproductive health care workers. Gov. Gavin Newsom signed an order to allow health officials to access the program. Kat Deburgh with the Health Officers Association of California says this is a necessary step. Health officers entered this field to protect people, and this new era of vitriol and partisanship has really changed things. She said 10 public health officials have resigned since the beginning of the pandemic. One of them was health officer for Orange County, who stepped down following protests outside her home. 11: 07 am: CDC releases safety guidelines for Halloween, Dia de los Muertos and Thanksgiving trick - or - treating isn't recommended this Halloween, according to new guidelines released by the USCenters for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC has recently released information on activity risk levels of fall holidays, including Halloween, Dia de los Muertos, and Thanksgiving. Some suggestions for lower - risk activities for Halloween include: doing Halloween scavenger hunts where children look for Halloween - theme decorations outside and from a distance around their neighborhood. Having scavenger hunt - style trick - or - treat search with household members inside your home or in your backyard. Moderate risk activities include preparing Halloween goodie bags and placing them At edge of driveway or yard for neighborhood children to take them. One of the highest risk activities is participating in traditional trick - or - treating and attending crowded indoor costume parties. Cdc recommends avoiding those to help mitigate the spread of COVID - 19. Cdc also has a list of recommendations on how to safely celebrate religious holidays this fall like Yom Kippur, Navratri, and Diwali.


Wednesday, October 21

2: 42 pm: Shasta County moves back into the red tier after COVID - 19 outbreak at evangelical college Shasta County will face greater restrictions as it grapples with a surge in COVID - 19 cases, many of which are tied to evangelical college, according to Associated Press. Over 120 students and staff have tested positive for the virus in the past two weeks at Bethel School of Supernatural Ministry. Shasta County officials say that outbreak was large enough to contribute to the recent spike in COVID - 19 cases across the county, and move them back into the red tier. The county will have to revert to new regulations on restaurants, bars, theaters and businesses. The County recorded more than 500 new Coronavirus cases in the past two weeks, pushing its total case number since March to 1 158. Bethel School did not immediately return calls for comment. 1: 55 pm: California has not seen a link between school reopening and Coronavirus transmission. So far, California has not seen a link between the reopening of K - 12 schools for in - person learning and increased Coronavirus transmission. States top public health official Dr. Mark Ghaly said it could take time for trends to emerge, but results so far are encouraging. California requires counties to report COVID - 19 levels and infection rates below certain thresholds before they can allow K - 12 schools to broadly reopen for in - person instruction. Yesterday, 32 out of total 58 counties were eligible to open. This is an increase from 28 counties a week earlier. The State has seen a broad decline in the number of Coronavirus cases and hospitalizations in recent weeks.


Tuesday, October 20

3: 13 pm: Placer, some Central Valley counties get state approval to continue reopening. Placer County is moving into the orange tier and several Central Valley counties are moving into the Red tier, California Health officials said during the COVID - 19 update Tuesday. The announcement covers the latest changes in the state Blueprint for Safer Economy, which allows local health officials to gradually reopen indoor and outdoor businesses based on their country's case rate and percentage of tests coming back positive. In the moderate tier, Placer County restaurants can open indoors at 50% capacity or for a maximum of 200 people, whichever is smaller. Bars where meals are provided can continue serving patrons outside. Gyms and fitness centers can open indoors at 25% capacity. Movie theatres can open indoors at 50% capacity. Sierra County became one of just eight counties to reach the yellow tier for areas with a positivity rate of under 2%. In those counties, bars, cardrooms, arcades, indoor playgrounds, roller skating rinks and a few other activities can open indoors at 50% capacity. Colusa, Kern, Kings, San Benito, Stanislaus and Sutter counties will now move into the Red tier. On Tuesday, the state also released new guidelines for celebrating Halloween and Dia de Los Muertos. They are discouraging traditional trick - or - treating practices, and instead suggesting at - home Halloween activities. Guidelines do allow for having outdoor meals with two other households. There are also suggestions for ways to make outdoor or virtual altar to honor deceased loved ones during Dia de Los Muertos. 9: 23 am: California coronavirus hospitalization rate lowest since start of the pandemic over the weekend, California hospitalization rate reached its lowest in the past six months, according to Mercury News. There were 2 209 people hospitalized across the state on Saturday, lower than any other day except for April 1, first day the state began tracking their hospital data. California hit its active patients peak back on July 21, with a total of 7 170 hospitalizations. Still, this rate drop is a decline of just 7. 7% in the past two weeks. The daily average of cases across the state is about 3 300 and has been at that level for about a month after another 2 454 cases were reported on Sunday. Deaths were in single - digits, only the second time since the start of the pandemic, totaling nine deaths across six counties. Despite the drop in rates, Shasta County is one of 15 counties in the state where cases increased and were higher on Friday than two weeks ago. The next highest case rate is in Sonoma County, with a daily increase of 57% during the last two weeks. 9: 08 am: Deadline to reverse California budget cuts might pass without another stimulus package. It looks unlikely that the federal government will draft and pass another coronavirus stimulus package by California's Thursday deadline to reverse budget cuts, according to CalMatters. The State cut about $11 billion, and without extra federal funding, state will face an estimated $8. 7 budget deficit in 2021.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Critics cite America's 'absolute failures'

Crossing the 200 000 death mark is not the milestone the US want, but should not be surprising due to America's absolute failures during the pandemic, according to ABC News contributor John Brownstein, PhD, epidemiologist at Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard epidemiology professor. The first US death from COVID - 19 was reported on Feb. 29 in WASHINGTON State. The death toll steadily climbed in March as New York City became the US epicenter of the outbreak. By beginning of April, US was seeing over 1 000 New COVID - 19 deaths each day. The deadliest day was April 15, when over 6 400 new deaths were report, according to CDC. While the elderly, those with underlying health conditions and racial and ethnic minorities were especially vulnerable, no one was immune. Early deaths include a 93 - year - old Holocaust survivor and the 4 - month - old daughter of a New York City firefighter. Workers on front lines treating patients also become victims. More than 1 000 people have now die, according to the Guardian and KHN. Prea Nakieshore, 34, WHO registered patient in Hospital emergency Department in Queens, New York, died from COVID - 19 on April 5. She loves working at the hospital, her fiance, Marcus Khan, told ABC News in April. She wanted to do her part. She was a dedicated mom who lived for her children, Khan add. She will always be the love of my life. Nakieshore was among 100 000 Americans dead by the end of May, by which point fatalities were accelerating in the South. Then in summer, US lost all control, Brownstein say. It's sort of been this whack - amole situation, where there's major increase in New York City - where the starting point was - then pattern of different regions in the country lighting up, and absolute failures of country to respond, Brownstein say. Even though we know how to control this thing, we are just not capable. Of implementing at national scale - which is what we would require to keep those numbers down through summer. It's incredibly sad that we are in this state. Covid - 19 is now the third leading cause of death in the US this year, behind heart disease and cancer, said Lee. Brownstein gives three reasons for why the US death toll is so high: America's inability to respond to crisis; nation's flawed healthcare system in which so many Black and Latino Americans have limited access; and the population's vulnerability at Sept. 16 press conference, President Donald Trump pointed to White House modeling from spring that predict 100 000 to 240 000 dead if social distancing measures were take and between 1. 5 to 2. 2 million deaths if they were not. This was our prediction, that if we do a good job well be about 100 000 to 240 000 deaths. And we are below that substantially, and well see what comes out, but that would be if we do a good job, Trump say.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

What comes next

Reopening would make Miami - Dade, with 350 000 students, by far the largest district in the country to have students in their classrooms full - time. New York City, nation's biggest District, already began restarting in - person instruction on Monday, but with students only attending part - time. Students in Los Angeles and Chicago, second and third - largest systems, attend classes remotely. Miami - Dade students in prekindergarten, kindergarten and first grade, and students with special needs, will return on Oct. 14. Everyone else will be back by Oct. 21. The Superintendent, Alberto M. Carvalho, had proposed phasing in students starting on Sept. 30, but Board members say they needed more assurances that schools have enough personal protective equipment and contingency policies in place to handle in - person instruction. I dont feel that were ready, Lubby Navarro, one of the board members, say. Mr. Carvalho said that District administrators have tried to think of every possible scenario, but it not going to be perfect. But we cannot allow, as they often say, good to be the enemy of perfect, he add. Schools elsewhere in the state began offering in - person instruction in August, despite a legal fight by teachers unions against the requirement by State Education officials, but three big districts in South Florida were allowed to open remotely while their communities try to contain the coronavirus. Positivity rates have continued to drop this month in those districts in Miami - Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties. In Miami - Dade, classes began online last month but were mar by technical glitches, including cyberattacks that school administrators say were carried out in part by high school junior.S Broader problems with district online platforms were failure and embarrassment, Perla Tabares Hantman, School Board chairwoman, say. Tuesday's decision came after a nearly 29 - hour virtual School Board meeting that began on Monday and continued overnight as the District played 762 public comments recorded via voicemail for some 18 hours. Many of the comments oppose reopening schools. Members of the local Teachers union question whether enough safety protocols would be in place to protect employees from coronavirus. Several teachers say their requests for accommodation based on their health issues have been deny. More deaths have been announced in the United States than in any other country, and reports of new coronavirus cases have climbed in the US and parts of Europe in recent days, suggesting an uncertain new phase in the crisis. Some estimated in March that fewer than 500 people would die over the course of the pandemic. More like 60 000, leading US authority on Infectious Disease predict in April. Anywhere from 75 000 80 000 to 100 000 people, President Trump said in May. But even as the toll has gone from hazy estimates to cold realities, sheer scale has remained hard to grasp.


Monday, October 19

11: 00 am: Every registered active Californian voter will get a mail - in ballot for the first time due to the pandemic. This November's election could test California's commitment to voting by mail. While Californians have been voting by mail for years, not every county has fully embraced it. Counties like Los Angeles haven't fully adopted mail - in voting, while in March, over 75% of ballots cast in primary came from mail - in voting. This year, every active registered voter will get a ballot by mail at least 29 days before the election. State officials hope it will encourage more people to try mail - in voting to reduce the risk of spreading coronavirus. To get more information on mail - in voting and to preview your ballot, visit CapRadio's Election 2020 Voter Guide.


Thursday, October 8

9: 55 am: Yolo County offering free Flu shots to residents Yolo County is offering free Flu vaccines starting on Oct. 6 through Oct. 27 to help fight Flu this fall. On Monday, Gov. Gavin Newsom said in a press conference update on COVID - 19 that Californians should get flu shot to help prevent what some have referred to as twindemic, which is a potential second wave of COVID - 19 transmissions that happen concurrently. Newsom said this possible twindemic would be putting stress, putting pressure on our hospital system at the same time, draining resources and impacting on the quality of care all of us deserve. Yolo County residents interested in getting Flu shot can either go to any of seven currently planned locations across the county without appointment or schedule one by calling 666 - 8552. They can also visit their country's website to get updated information on locations and times. 9: 33 am: US and others refuse to join international COVID - 19 vaccine distribution ambitious international project to deliver possible future coronavirus vaccine to the world's most disadvantaged people is facing potential shortage of money, cargo planes, refrigeration and vaccines, according to Associated Press. Even recipients of vaccines are becoming skeptical. One of the most substantial obstacles is that rich countries have locked up most of the world's potential vaccine supply through all of 2021. Countries like the US and others have refused to join the project, called Covax. Harvard University Global Health Expert Alicia Yamin says she fears that the window is closing for Covax to be pulled off. She also said that developing countries probably will not get vaccinated until 2022 or 2023.


Friday, October 2

2: 00 pm: Federal Health administrators say Nevada needs to rescind a statewide ban on some rapid coronavirus tests. Federal Health administrators are telling Nevada officials that they have to rescind a statewide directive issued several days ago telling nursing homes to stop using two types of rapid coronavirus tests, according to AP. Nevada Health officials were advising nursing homes to stop using those rapid tests because of the likelihood of false - positive results. The head of the Federal Department of Health and Human Services of COVID - 19 diagnostic testing said that the state is prohibited by law from imposing a ban order on Oct. 2. Dhhs's head say there is no perfect test for viruses and say that the value of identifying 40% of true positives is lifesaving matter for nursing homes. 9: 20 am: 11% of Bay Area residents stay home all day due to pandemic statewide, rate of COVID - 19 transmission has been creeping up. Gov. Gavin Newsom warns that this increase could put at risk the recent decline of fresh cases throughout California. In the Bay Area, number of viruses, which is how many people one infected person spreads the virus to, has gone up to nearly 1 - 1 ratio last month, according to the San Francisco Chronicle. Health officials are also concerned that there may be an uptick of 89% in coronavirus hospitalization cases from last month's Labor Day celebrations. To many San Francisco residents, their best option is to continue to shelter in place and stay home. New data collected by SafeGraph finds that an average of roughly 11% of people in the area stay home all day, according to companies ' anonymous cell phone location data. Some residents have found themselves underwhelmed by National coronavirus response and say there has been a lack of clear direction. Even vaccine might not get some to leave their homes as pandemic has become politicize. 9: 17 am: Airbnb will require hosts to comply with enhanced cleaning procedures app - based home - sharing platform Airbnb say that they will require all of their hosts to comply with their new enhanced cleaning procedures. Hosts have until Nov. 20 to commit to cleaning protocols such as scrubbing floors and other surfaces with soap and water, washing linens on high heat, disinfecting high - touch items like door knobs, and ventilating rooms. Hosts WHO do comply may be suspended or moved from Airbnb. Companies also say that guests and hosts must wear masks and social distance when interacting with each other.


Wednesday, September 30

After months of being close, outdoor playgrounds across California can now reopen, according to KPBS. Many parents felt frustrated that bars and restaurants were opening, but outdoor playgrounds were still covered in tape and shut down, KPBS report. For families looking to get back to the playground, there are a few new rules: playtime is limited to 30 minutes per family. Continue to keep a distance of 6 feet from other families and children. People over the age of 2 must wear face masks No eating or drinking at the playground. Handwashing before and after playing is recommended. Individual jurisdictions will make final decisions on when to open.


Tuesday, September 29

Gavin Newsom has signed AB 3088, bill extending a halt to evictions for unpaid rent due to the COVID - 19 pandemic. Lawmakers passed the bill Monday. The States eviction moratorium was set to expire Sept. 2 if lawmakers didnt take action. Ab 3088 pauses evictions through January 31 as result of unpaid rent during the first six months of the pandemic. Renters would have to fill out documents certifying that they were affected by COVID - 19 to be eligible for protection and would also have to pay at least 25% of their rent starting in September. For more updates on Monday night end of the California legislative session, head here.


Wednesday, October 21

The city of Beverly Hills has banned trick - or - treating this Halloween to try to prevent the spread of Coronavirus. Action was taken in urgency ordinance approved by the City Council on Tuesday night. Ordinance bars trick - or - treaters from going house to house or from car to car, which is described as trunk or treating. People also may not provide candy and other Halloween treats to any person outside their own household. People are prohibited from spraying shaving cream on others, except inside their own homes. License barbers are also exempt, so they may shave customers. The city is also banning pedestrians and vehicles from certain streets. 11: 09 am: COVID - 19 cases linked to Northern California evangelical college have doubled Coronavirus cases linked to Shasta Countys Bethel School of Supernatural Ministry have doubled over last week to 274, according to Associated Press. Krcr - TV report found that Countys officials say that these new cases are tied to Bethel School, pushing the County to have the highest rate of new infections in California. Health officials also say outbreaks among students and staff at Bethel School have driven Countys recent COVID - 19 spike. A senior leader at Reddings Bethel Church attracted attention this week for an Instagram video criticizing masks as worthless. A new uptick in cases prompted State officials last week to revert to tighter restrictions on restaurants, bars and other businesses in the County. 10: 09 am: Golf player Dustin Johnson tests positive for COVID - 19 Professional golfer Dustin Johnson will not be participating in the CJ Cup at Los Vegas Shadow Creek course because he tested positive for Coronavirus, according to the Associated Press. Johnson, number one player in golf, isnt only professional golfer to have tested positive since the PGA Tour resume back in June. His positive test make him 11 player to get the virus. Johnson is the reigning PGA Tour player of the year after winning the FedEx Cup in early September. He has not played since tying for sixth in the US Open a month ago. He notified Tour of his symptoms, which led him to take a test.


Tuesday, October 20

4: 30 pm: No Disneyland yet, but California theme parks get path to reopening. Major California theme parks like Disneyland have a way to go before they can reopen. State Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Mark Ghaly today unveiled the reopening plan for major outdoor public venues Tuesday. It allows parks with capacity of less than 15 000 to reopen if the park's home county is in the orange tier. Parks with larger capacities will have to wait until their county is in the least - restrictive yellow tier. Disneyland can hold about 85 000 people and is in a county that is still in the Red tier, two levels up. Guidance states that smaller theme parks may reopen with limited capacity, each 25% or 500 people, whichever is fewer. Smaller theme parks may only offer outdoor attractions, and ticket sales will be limited to visitors from the county where the theme park is locate. Face masks will be required at all times, unless person is eating or drinking. 1: 49 pm: Older workers are facing higher unemployment amid pandemic A New study from New School in New York City found that workers 55 and older lost their jobs sooner and were rehired slower during the coronavirus pandemic, according to the Associated Press. These workers continue to face higher job losses than their counterparts, those aged 35 to 54. From April through September, study found that older workers ' unemployment rate was 9. 7% compared to 8. 6% for mid - career workers. All of this was based on a six - month rolling average. Study also say that the rate was far worse for older workers who are black, women, or lack college degrees. 1: 41 pm: Nevada is seeing historically high voting rates due to mail - in ballots. Nevada's decision to mail all active voters ballots amid the pandemic has led to historically high return rates and less early voting than in 2016, according to the Associated Press. With more than two weeks until the election, more than twice as many Nevada voters have returned ballots by mail than in the entire 2016 Election. On Monday, election officials reported that nearly 176 000 voters have returned mail - in ballots in early October, versus less than 79 000 voters that cast absentee or in all - mail precincts in 2016. Register Democrats have returned ballots at higher rates than registered Republicans, who have historically preferred voting on Election Day rather than early. 10: 55 am: Feared jump in coronavirus hospitalizations in California hasnt happened while the predicted jump in coronavirus hospitalization cases in California hasnt happen, Gov. Gavin Newsom isnt going to change what he calls slow and stubborn approach to reopening, according to the Associated Press. In September, Newsom administration warned of a possible 89% increase in hospitalizations by the end of October, but hospitalizations have dropped by 15% since then. On Monday, Newsom warned of a decline in the rate of hospitalizations. Newsom said he saw a slight uptick in hospitalizations across the state last week and that it reminder that continued vigilance is needed.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

The places hit hardest

T he coronavirus pandemic is hitting hard in America's most vulnerable communities, already burdened by toxic industries and environmental pollution. Experts warn that this elevates the risk of developing complications from COVID - 19. Pollute neighbourhoods in cities such as Los Angeles, Houston, Newark, and Detroit, as well as the Navajo Nation are among the country's worst virus hotspots, Guardian analysis find. It follows a preliminary US study published last week indicating that even small exposure to pollution in years before virus outbreak is associated with a 15% higher risk of death from coronavirus. As the viruses sweeps across the US, major risk factors include poverty, pollution, pre - existing medical conditions, substandard housing and inadequate health care, running water and nutrition. These are issues that most commonly afflict poor people of color. Environmental justice communities are already the most vulnerable, marginalize, uninsured and sickest, with high rates of asthma, respiratory illness, diabetes and heart disease, says Robert Bullard, professor of urban planning and Environmental policy at Texas Southern University. Guardian researched deaths per capita, and speed of spread of the virus in a number of US cities and communities and find: Los Angeles, California. There have been at least 296 deaths from COVID - 19 in Los Angeles county, which includes the City of Los Angeles, and where the death rate was three per 100 000 people on Monday - 50% higher than the statewide average. The county has some of the worst air quality in the US. Detroit, Michigan. Wayne county - which includes Detroit - has had more than 700 COVID - 19 deaths, and its death rate of 40 per 100 000 people, is more than 250% higher than the statewide average. Detroit had the the 12 worst soot pollution in 2019, according to the American Lung Association, and thousands of households lack running water. Houston, Texas. Harris county, which includes metropolitan Houston, had 79 confirmed coronavirus cases per 100 000 people by Monday - 61% higher than the state average. Last week, officials confirmed that African Americans accounted for two - thirds of early COVID - 19 deaths in the City - home to widespread heavy - polluting industries - despite accounting for only 22. 5% of the total population. Navajo Nation. Navajo county has the highest virus rate in Arizona with 317 cases per 100 000, compared with 53 per 100 000 statewide. Nation has longstanding environmental and health inequalities.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Cases at colleges and universities

Dallas At least 60 coronavirus deaths in the US can be linked to college campuses, according to an analysis by The New York Times. Times surveyed more some 1 500 colleges and found more than 50 000 COVID - 19 cases traced to US College and universities since the beginning of the pandemic. At least 100 colleges have reported 100 or more cases, according to the Times. With the coronavirus spreading through colleges at alarming rates, universities are scrambling to find quarantine locations in dormitory buildings and off - campus properties to isolate thousands of students who have caught COVID - 19 or been exposed to it. Sacred Heart University has converted a 34 - room guest House at the former Connecticut headquarters of General Electric to quarantine students. The University of South Carolina ran out of space at dormitory for quarantined students and began sending them to rooms it rented in hotel - like quarters at the training Center for prosecutors. The Air Force Academy sent 400 cadets to hotels to free up space on its Colorado base for quarantines. Actions again demonstrate how the virus has uprooted traditional campus life amid the pandemic that has killed nearly 200 000 people in the US and has proven to be especially problematic for universities since the start of the school year. Many colleges quickly scrap in - person learning in favor of online. After cases began to spike, bars have been shut down in college towns, and students, fraternities and sororities have been repeatedly disciplined for parties and large gatherings. Health officials such as White House coronavirus task Force member Dr. Deborah Birx have been urging colleges to keep students on campus to avoid them infecting members of their family and community. At Sacred Heart, which acquired the 66 - acre GE campus in 2016, guest house that once provided rooms for visiting corporate executives will be used for the rest of the year to isolate any of its 3 000 students who tested positive for COVID - 19 and are unable to return home, say Gary MacNamara, Schools Director of Public safety. Rooms are stocked with snacks and equipped with TVs and work stations for remote learning. Heath officials will do periodic check - ups, security is station outside and card swipes keep track of who enters or leaves. With all the stress and fear students may have in isolation, we believe we need to make it as comfortable as possible, MacNamara say. This guest house helps the US accomplish that. Ryan Bologna has been locked in his dorm room at the University of Connecticut since 12 cases were found in his building last week. Hes allowed to go to the dining hall next door, but has had no other contact with the outside world. Zoom classes and virtual marching band practice and video gaming were not what Communications major had envisioned for the start of his senior year. I do have friends I 've made throughout the years that I can talk to, he say. But if I were a freshman, I would be really struggling right now as far as social aspect.Sss


Thursday, October 8

The State recently announced guidance on small group gatherings, but in a move to prevent frat parties from spreading COVID - 19, Yolo County took the rules a step further by limiting gatherings to 16 people. Jenny Tan is spokeswoman for County, home to UC Davis. She says the state limit of three households gathering for no more than two hours outdoors leaves room for a lot of people. So household could also mean eight to 10 roommates are living together in a house, Tan say. It could also mean fraternity or sorority house. So when you think about three households gathering, that could actually be a pretty large number, depending on what your household consists of. Tan says the move is aimed at keeping the County from slipping back into the purple tier, most restrictive, as winter arrives. Yolo County is currently in the red tier and its numbers have been on the rise thanks partly to the outbreak at Alderson Convalescent Hospital in Woodland that has left four people dead. The deaths came after 58 residents and 16 staff members tested positive. It's second outbreak at Alderson first occurred in July. 3: 42 pm: Washoe County in Nevada has record - high COVID - 19 cases coronavirus infections have reached another record - high peak in the Reno - Sparks area, according to Associated Press. Washoe County health district officers continue to raise concerns that public gatherings size limit is too lenient. On Wednesday, County topped 1 500 points for active cases, all - time high. The Sheriff's Office also announced the jail was going under lockdown after 11 people were incarcerated and five employees tested positive for COVID - 19. County health officer Kevin Dick says the latest surge has made being out and about riskier than just about any other time since the first local case was confirmed in March. 3: 36 pm: Raiders place 5 more players on COVID - 19 list Five Las Vegas Raiders players have been placed on their reserve / COVID - 19 list after they were determined to be in close contact with COVID - 19 positive teammate, according to Associated Press. The team placed four starting offensive linemen, Kolton Miller, Denzelle Good, Rodney Hudson, and Gabe Jackson, along with safety Johnathan Abram on the reserve list because of high - risk contact with tackle Trent Brown. The league also moved the Raiders ' game this week against Tampa Bay from prime time to the afternoon. 11: 42 am: New strict rules for California theme parks may delay their reopening. Thousands of theme park workers were sent home in March when the coronavirus pandemic hit. Now, state health officials have announced strict new rules for reopening parks, according to the Associated Press. Parks like Disneyland and Universal Studios have been pining to reopen for months, and instead, they are now bracing for an even more prolonged shutdown. Surrounding communities are lined with hotels, restaurants, and shops to cater to tourists, but they are no longer coming.


Friday, October 2

4: 53 pm: Nevada to allow non - contact rec league sports to continue. Nevadans will be able to compete in recreational league sports again starting Saturday, after months of being shut down due to COVID - 19. Governor Steve Sisolak announced Friday that youth and adult teams will be allowed to meet again, but the new policy comes with some restrictions. Not all sports will be allowed under this directive, Sisolak say. Only minimal - contact and non - contact sports will be allow. Baseball, soccer and swimming all make the cut, but not full - contact sports like football, boxing and basketball, which pose a greater threat to transmission. Leagues will have to provide screening and temperature checks for athletes and spectators. And after the game is over, Sisolak asks everyone in attendance to leave immediately to reduce the risk of new infections. Sisolak also appeals to non - players to demonstrate safe behavior at sporting events. Coaches and parents are role models. They are not passive spectators, he say. If they wear masks, itll encourage everybody to wear their masks and I am confident they will. The new policy doesnt apply to high school or college sports, which have their own COVID - 19 safety regulations.


Tuesday, September 29

8: 56 am: Nevada Health officials expect an uptick in new coronavirus cases after the presidential rally last weekend. After last weekend's Nevada rally for President Donald Trump, health officials say they expect to see growth in their state's coronavirus cases, according to Associated Press. Trumps rallies in Minden and Henderson both violate the state 50 - person cap on events. Thousands of mostly mask - less supporters attend both, with the Henderson rally being held indoors. This is the first rally Trump has held indoors since his one in Tulsa, Oklahoma in June. Health officials say that surge of cases soon after likely contributed to the rally. As of Monday, Nevada had reported 73 814 cases of COVID - 19 since the start of the pandemic, and 1 456 deaths. 5: 45 pm: Fresno judge orders school to stop in - person classes Fresno County judge has ordered classrooms to close at a private school that has defied state and local health orders aimed at slowing the spread of the coronavirus. The ruling Tuesday marked a legal victory for Fresno County Health officials, who had unsuccessfully ordered Immanuel Schools last month to stop in - person instruction. K - 12 Christian school, with about 600 students, reopen its campus on Aug. 13. It is argued that parents should decide if their children attend school and claim students have achieved herd immunity. Judge says school operating poses irreparable harm to the community during pandemic. 12: 59 pm: California Fitness centers sue state over virus closures California Fitness centers have filed a lawsuit alleging Gov. Gavin Newsoms measures aimed at curbing the spread of coronavirus unfairly target industry and are demanding they be allowed to reopen. Scott Street, lawyer for California Fitness Alliance, said Tuesday that the suit was filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court. It accuses state and Los Angeles County officials of requiring gyms to close without providing evidence that they contribute to virus outbreaks and at a time when staying healthy is critical to residents. A message seeking comment was sent to the California Department of Public Health. 9: 21 am: California test positivity rate at its lowest since April over past week, California COVID - 19 test positivity rate was 3. 5%, the lowest it has been since data reporting started in March, according to the Los Angeles Times. August's positivity rate was nearly twice as high. Some health officials believe that lower rate could be attributed to fewer people getting tests during wildfires, and possible yet - to - be - seen transmission surge after Labor Day weekend. We are, in fact, somewhat challenged about getting good data because weve had both extreme heat and weve had fires that have created unhealthy air conditions, says Director of Los Angeles County Department of Public Health Barbara Ferrer. What that leads to, unfortunately, is a lot less testing.


Wednesday, October 21

2: 59 pm: Court orders California to decrease San Quentin State Prison population by half due to pandemic. San Quentin State Prison, one of the world's most famous prisons, needs to cut its population to less than half of its design capacity, according to the Associated Press. The California appeals Court has ordered State corrections officials to cut the population, citing deliberate indifference to the plight of people currently incarcerated there throughout the COVID - 19 pandemic. On Wednesday, State Prison officials said they are deciding whether to appeal. Otherwise, order will force them to parole or transfer about 1 100 people serving time in State Prison north of San Francisco. San Quentin is California's oldest Prison, and is home to its only death row. It was the site of one of the nation's worst Coronavirus outbreaks, with 28 inmate deaths and 2 200 infections. 2: 01 pm: Nevada has no plans to curb the COVID - 19 spike while the rate of Coronavirus infections is steadily rising in Nevada, State officials have no plans to reimplement any restrictions to curb virus spread, according to the Associated Press. Gov. Steve Sisolak said on Tuesday that the State's spike was in line with national and worldwide trends. He said he hops not to bring back more restrictions on businesses and large public gatherings and implored residents not to succumb to COVID fatigue. The infection rate has been increasing since the State eased public gathering restrictions on Oct. 1. Since the caseload is high, White House Coronavirus Task Force has since re - designated the State as a red zone. 11: 16 am: Fresno private school fin $15 00 for continuing teaching in classrooms Fresno County Immanuel Schools have been ordered to pay $15 000 for defying judges ' order to close classrooms and stop in - person teaching, according to the Associated Press. A three - month legal battle between a private K - 12 Christian school and County and State officials goes all the way up to Fresno County Superior Court. The decision to fine Reedley school came on Tuesday. This judgment may be the first of its kind against California school for violating health orders to slow the spread of COVID - 19. 10: 55 am: Several Northern California counties move to less restrictive Coronavirus tier, one becomes more restrictive Several Northern California counties have moved into Coronavirus safety color tiered system, according to SF Gate. Butte and Napa counties both moved from the red tier to the less restrictive orange tier, allowing some more businesses to open. San Francisco County has progressed from orange to yellow, which is the least restrictive tier. San Francisco will move forward with opening offices up to 25% capacity and allowing some activities like indoor dining to 50% capacity starting Nov. 3. Shasta County has instead moved back to the purple tier, most restrictive tier, due to the recent spike in cases.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Cases in jails and prisons

At least 902 coronavirus - related deaths have been confirmed in America's prisons and jails, surpassing the number of inmates who have been executed in the last 20 years. The virus has ravaged prison and jail facilities since March, resulting in more than 114 000 confirmed COVID - 19 Cases among inmates, and the deaths of 72 staff, according to data from UCLA's COVID - 19 Behind Bars Data Project. The figures were first pointed out by Ohio State University Law professor Douglas Berman on his blog. Prisons and jails across the US have come under fire for their cramped, unsanitary conditions, and prison officials and elected leaders have been urged to allow the release of certain inmates. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. More prisoners in the United States have died of coronavirus since March than have been executed since 2001, new data show. Ucla COVID - 19 Behind Bars Data Project has tracked 902 confirmed Deaths in Prisons and jails across the country as of August 26. According to the Death Penalty Information Center, 839 prisoners have been executed since January 1 2001. Since 1976, 1 522 inmates have been executed in America. Ohio State University Law professor Douglas Berman was first to point out COVID - 19 Deaths had surpassed the number of executions on his blog on August 23. He also noted that it's problematic in many ways to compare coronavirus deaths to executions, given that the Death Penalty is reserved for people who commit aggravated murder, whereas coronavirus has killed inmates regardless of the severity of crimes they were incarcerated for. Faith leaders, activists, and family members honor 17 people that died of coronavirus while incarcerated on May 12 2020 in San Francisco, California. Justin Sullivan / Getty Images The virus has ravaged prison and jail facilities since March, resulting in more than 114 000 confirmed COVID - 19 Cases, according to UCLA Data. Director of UCLA Project, Sharon Dolovich, has noted that figure is likely undercount due to lack of widespread testing. Ucla Data also tracks disease's impact on prison and jail staff, tallying more than 25 000 confirmed cases and 72 deaths. Facilities have come under fire for their cramped, unsanitary conditions, and prison officials and elected leaders have been urged to allow the release of certain inmates. Some jurisdictions have already done so, including California, which could release as many as 17 600 inmates early, according to the Associated Press. New Jersey lawmakers are also weighing the release of 3 000 prisoners, 20% of the state's total prison population. Read more: Ohio State University suspended 228 students before classes even started after they broke coronavirus rules and threw parties. Anonymous Instagram account claiming to promote COVID parties at Arizona State was deleted after school sue. But parties are still happening. You now have COVID: Massachusetts police hunt man accused of giving shoppers coronavirus hugs at Walmart CDC head say US coronavirus outbreak could be controlled if 90% of Americans follow safety guidelines like wearing masks

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Cases at food production facilities

Outbreaks of Coronavirus Disease 2019 among Food Production Workers may worsen pandemics disproportionate effects on people of color and increase underlying health, economic, and social disparities, according to analysis by Kaiser Family Foundation. Numerous COVID - 19 outbreaks in meat and poultry processing plants erupt not long after cases emerge in the United States. On May 1, study published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said that 19 States had reported 4913 cases and 20 deaths among approximately 130 000 workers at 115 meat and poultry processing facilities. Such facilities have distinctive factors that affect Workers risk of exposure to severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2. These factors include prolonged closeness to other workers for long shifts of up to 12 hours, exposure to potentially contaminate shared surfaces or objects, and close contact during transportation to and from work, such as in ride - share vans, carpools, or public transportation. More recently, according to a report by Reuters, although social distancing may be less of an issue for agricultural workers who work outside harvesting fruits and vegetables in fields, facilities that package foods have conditions similar to those of meat and poultry processing plants and are emerging as hot spots for SARS - CoV - 2 spread. In their review of data from County officials, Reuters found that the majority of more than 600 cases of COVID - 19 tallied by late May among agricultural workers in Yakima County, Washington, were workers in the apple industry and other packing operations or warehouses. In the KFF analysis, Samantha Artiga, MHSA, and Matthew Rae, MPA, MPH, examine key characteristics of 3. 4 million people who work in US Food Production industries, including meat and poultry processors, seafood producers, fruit and vegetable producers, crop production, and other food manufacturing businesses. Their goal was to identify those who are affected by risks posed by COVID - 19 and consider the health and financial implications of the pandemic for these workers and their communities. Their findings indicate that COVID - 19 outbreaks among Food Production Workers may exacerbate the disproportionate impact COVID - 19 is having on people of color and widen underlying health, social, and economic disparities, authors note. The federal government has designated the food and agricultural sector as part of essential critical infrastructure, industries that have special responsibility in these times to continue operations. A Presidential Executive Order issued on April 28 invoked the Defense Production Act to keep meat processing plants open. Moreover, on May 19, US Department of Agriculture and US Food and Drug Administration said the federal government could authorize similar actions to keep companies that manufacture, process, pack, hold, or grow or harvest food open and running. Kff analysis finds that although the majority of Food Production workers are White and US citizens, this sector has disproportionately larger shares of Hispanic and noncitizen workers than in the US workforce overall. About one - third of food production workers are Hispanic, and 22% are noncitizens. One in 4 food production workers is less than fluent in English.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Other significant clusters

Erica Wilson, MD 1, *; Catherine V. Donovan, PhD 1 2 *; Margaret Campbell, MSN 3; Thevy Chai, MD 4; Kenneth Pittman, MHA 4; Arlene C. Sena, MD 5; Audrey Pettifor, PhD 5; David J. Weber, MD 5; Aditi Mallick, MD 6; Anna Cope, PhD 1 7; Deborah S. Porterfield, MD 1; Erica Pettigrew, MD, JD 3 8; Zack Moore, MD 1 preventing transmission of SARS - CoV - 2, virus that cause coronavirus Disease 2019, in institutes of higher education present unique set of challenges because of presence of congregate living settings and difficulty limiting socialization and group gatherings. Before August 2020, minimal data was available regarding COVID - 19 outbreaks in these settings. On August 3rd 2020, University of North Carolina broadly opened campus for the first time since transitioning to primarily remote learning in March. Consistent with CDC guidance at that time, steps were taken to prevent the spread of SARS - CoV - 2 on campus. During August 3 - 25, 670 laboratory - confirmed cases of COVID - 19 were identify; 96% were among patients aged under 22 years. Eighteen clusters of five or more epidemiologically linked cases within 14 days of one another were report; 30% of cases were linked to cluster. Student gatherings and congregated living settings, both on and off campus, likely contribute to the rapid spread of COVID - 19 within the university community. On August 19, all university classes transition online, and additional mitigation efforts were implement. At this point, 334 University - associate COVID - 19 cases had been reported to the local Health Department. The rapid increase in cases within 2 weeks of opening campus suggests that robust measures are needed to reduce transmission at institutes of higher education, including efforts to increase consistent use of masks, reduce the density of on - campus housing, increase testing for SARS - CoV - 2, and discourage student gatherings. University students return to residence halls from August 3 - 9 2020, and in - person classes begin on August 10. Mitigation steps taken to prevent the spread of SARS - CoV - 2 on campus include scheduling move - in appointments across 1 - week period, decreasing classroom density to facilitate physical distancing, and reducing maximum dining hall capacity and increasing takeout options. Students were required to sign acknowledgment of community standards and University guidelines recommending daily symptom checks, use of masks in all indoor common spaces and classrooms, physical distancing of 6 feet in indoor and outdoor settings, and limitations on group gatherings consistent with local guidelines. Approximately 95% of students signed acknowledgment; however, data on adherence to these important mitigation strategies was not available. Reentry testing for COVID - 19 and quarantine before or after arrival on campus were not used. Except for two dormitories reserved for isolation and quarantine, residence halls open at 60% - 85% capacity, with most students in double rooms. Those at increased risk for severe illness from COVID - 19, according to CDC guidance, had the option to request a single room. Undergraduate enrollment at university for the fall semester was 19 690 students. Approximately 5 800 of these undergraduate students resided on campus as of August 10. In 2019, 83% of undergraduate students were North Carolina residents.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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