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Ancient Norwegian property laws

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Last Updated: 17 November 2020

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Doors open into a tile foyer and hallway. To the right is an open living area, with oak parquet floors, white walls and, at its center, glass-wall staircase with wood steps that appear to float. A small dining area is set up at one end of the room, and a bigger dining table and living room are on opposite side. Sliding glass doors open onto a terrace that runs the length of the house. The kitchen, situated against side wall, has custom furnishings by Multiform, Danish kitchen crafter, with sleek white cabinetry and an island with recessed induction cooktop. A glass door opens onto a large patio with a covered barbecue station. The hallway leads to three bedrooms, all of which have access to the terrace. Bedrooms share a large bathroom with glossy tile flooring and vault ceiling with skylight. The second living room on the upper level maximizes water views through a wall of 13-foot floor-to-ceiling windows. Doors on either side of the room open onto separate roof terraces. Opposite the living room is the main suite, with a similar wall of windows, dressing room and bath with vessel sink and large walk-in shower. A free-standing soaking tub is positioned near windows in the bedroom. Homes lower level, with family room, wine cellar, half bath, laundry room and storage area, can be accessed from an attached two-car garage. 0. The 19-acre property has ornamental plantings set amid natural rock outcroppings. Locate on a cul-de-sac in a residential neighborhood, house is about a mile from several beaches, as well as shops, restaurants and cafes of Stavern, Mr. Leinaes say. TORP Sandefjord Airport is about a 25-minute drive northeast. Staverns population of roughly 5 000 swells dramatically in summer with vacationers, many of whom live in greater Oslo, about 90 minutes away, Mr. Leinaes say. In addition to beaches, attractions include a historic naval base that now houses art galleries and museums, and a coastal path that follows water for more than 20 miles, ending in the town of Helgeroa. In 2019, existing detach homes in Norway sell for an average of 25 691 kroners square meter, according to latest data from Statistics Norway, country's national Statistics institute. New homes sell for average 37 417 kroners a square meter. In Oslo, existing homes average 61 729 kroners square meter. Price pressure is higher in Oslo, waterside capital with about 700 000 residents, because of a growing population and insufficient housing supply, Mr. Lauridsen say. The number of complete detached houses in the Oslo area fell to an eight-year low in 2019, according to Statistics Norway, while newly complete multidwelling buildings slipped in 2019 after several years of increases. The Citys teeming market has made bidding wars more common, says Anders Nykkelmo Solem, general manager and partner at PrivatMegleren Gamle Oslo.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

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Historical development of Scandinavian law

Legal History is a well-establish discipline in all five Nordic countries. The father of Swedish Legal science, Johan Olofsson Stiernhook, is often mentioned as the first Nordic Legal author with an interest in Legal History. Seventeenth-and eighteenth-century Legal History was, following Lars Bjornes ' expression, largely patriotic, whereas source criticism was value less. This patriotism results mostly in an attempt to portray national Legal history as something unique, with some commentators finding Swedish legislators in ancient Greek literature. In eighteenth century, historical sources began to be approached more critically. Swedish Legal scholars such as David Nehrman, olof Rabenius and Anders Schonberg, as well as Danes Christian Ditlev Hedegaard and Peder Kofod Ancher, all discussed Historical themes alongside their dogmatic works. As elsewhere in nineteenth-century Europe, Legal History a separate branch of Legal studies started to develop in Nordic countries in vein of the Historical School of Jurisprudence. Dane Paul Detlef Christian Paulsen wished to establish what he called Nordic Legal History, and Grundrids af den danske Lovhistorie by Janus Lauritz Andreas Kolderup-Rosenvinge was even translated into German by one of the foremost Germanists of time, Karl Gustav Homeyer. Fredrik Peter Brandt from Norway was the Norwegian pioneer of Legal History where, as in Sweden, Johan August Posse and Knut Olivecrona carried flag for discipline. Nineteenth-century Finnish Legal scholars were very much historically orient, Matthias Calonius, Wilhelm Gabriel Lagus, Johan Jacob Nordstrom and Johan Philip Palmen serving as examples. The shift towards modern history writing and source criticism was, however, slow and gradual, and it was actually towards the end of the nineteenth century that achievements of modern Historical science started to influence Legal Historical research in Nordic countries. Danes Ebbe Hertzberg and Paul Johannes Jrgensen were trail-blazers, followed by others in Denmark and other Nordic countries in the twentieth century. The place of Roman Law in the research agenda of Nordic Legal scholars has traditionally been weak, although occasional works have appeared in that field as well. The Feeble tradition of Roman Law is not difficult to explain, weak reception of learning Roman Law in early modern having turned into an equally weak tradition of Roman Law studies both in research chambers as well as university curricula. In traditional German terminology, Nordic Legal historians have always been more Germanists than Romanists. Estonia is not considered part of Nordic country in either geographical or cultural sense. Historically, Estonia has been ruled by Danes, Swedes, Russians, and Germans. Although Estonians have close linguistic and racial ties with Finns, German cultural influence has been strong since the Middle Ages and continues to be important. Estonia is, however, included in this brief survey because of the close cooperation that Estonian Legal historians have had with Nordic countries since Estonia independence in 1990. The historiography of Estonian Legal History resembles that in Germany, with a strong nineteenth-century emphasis on both Germanist and Romanist research.

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* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Modern Scandinavian law

Old codes have been all but completely displaced by modern parliamentary statutes. In Sweden, the law of 1734 has been conserved as a formal framework. Elsewhere, plans for new and all-embracing codes are no longer entertain, but extensive codification of important parts of public and private law has taken place. An interesting feature of Scandinavian law is organized legislative cooperation that began in 1872 and has steadily increased in importance. In this way, Nordic states, including Iceland and Finland, have to a considerable degree obtained uniform legislation, especially regarding contracts and commerce, as well as in such fields of law as those concerned with family, person, nationality, and extradition. While conserving their national character, Scandinavian legal systems have adopted certain conceptions of civil law, chiefly through the influence of law schools; commercial law and laws of shipping and of companies, for example, conform more or less to common European patterns. Modern social welfare legislation, which has reached high standard, also has strong international connections. Scandinavian law is pliable and close to life, less dogmatic than other European legal systems, and relatively free of formal rules and exigencies. Great attention is paid to rules and principles that have evolved in practice, especially in courts. Much of law is judge-make; and because the principle of stare decisis do not obtain, courts have been free to meet demands of changing social conditions. Extensive participation of laymen in both civil and criminal proceedings may have contributed in some measure to the pragmatic and flexible character of modern Scandinavian law.

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Market Overview

Table

Duration until completion of service of process7
Duration of trial300
Duration of enforcement58
Total Days to Evict Tenant305

After a decade of uninterrupted house price rises Norway's housing market is stabilizing, due to stricter mortgage rulesand rising interest rates. The Nationwide house price index rose by a modest 2. 35 % during the year to Q3 2019, according to Statistics Norway. When adjusted for inflation, Norwegian house prices increase by a meagre 0. 69 % y-oy in Q3 2019. During the last quarter, nationwide house prices actually fell by 0. 8 %. Oslo, including Brum, had the highest house price increasesin country, at 3. 7 % annually during the year to Q3 2019, slight slowdown from 4. 01 % growth during the same period in 2018. In Bergen, house price index rose by 2. 22 % y-oy, up from 0. 88 % annual rise in Q3 2018. But during the latest quarter, house prices fell by 0. 94 % from the previous quarter. In Trondheim, house prices rose by 1. 72 % y-oy, in contrast with 0. 27 % drop in Q3 2018. In Q3 2019, house prices increased 0. 9 % q-oq. In Stavanger, house prices rose by 0. 92 % y-oy, compared to 1. 14 % annual increase in Q3 2018. During the latest quarter, local house prices fell by 2. 28 % q-oq. Of the countrys regions, Sr-stlandet had the highest annual price increase at a modest 3. 12 %, followed by Akershus excluding Brum and Agder and Rogaland excluding Stavanger. There were minimal annual price hikes in Nord-Norge, vestlandet excluding Bergen, and Trndelag, including Trondheim. On other hand, house prices were unchanged in Hedmark and Oppland. Demand continues to rise. Residential property sales in Norway rose by 4. 6 % to 65 214 units in the first three quarters of 2019, compared to the same period in 2018, according to Statistics Norway. In Oslo, sales soared by 23. 5 %. Despite this, construction remains weak. Dwelling completions fell by 5. 4 % y-oy in the first eleven months of 2019 while starts rise by 3. 7 %, according to Statistics Norway. In 2019, Norway's mainland GDP, which excludes volatile oil and shipping sectors, was estimated to have expanded by 2. 5 %, following 2. 5 % in 2018, and 2. 4 % in 2017, according to Norges Bank. Slower growth ahead is expect-GDP growth is likely to slow to 2 % in 2020 and to 1. 7 % in 2021, according to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Statistics Norway forecasts 2. 4 % growth in 2020 and 1. 9 % in 2021. Anyone can own, occupy, and invest in real estate in Norway.

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* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

God house

Some 1 200 years ago, ancient civilizations would visit large wooden temple in what is now Norway to pray and make sacrifices to Norse gods such as Odin and Thor-and archaeologists have found evidence of a pagan structure. Archaeologists from the University Museum of Bergen have been excavating sites in the Western region of the country and recently uncovered a 'god house' that was once a wooden structure and dates to the Viking Age. They say the building was about 45 feet long, 26 feet wide and stood nearly 40 feet high, and was used for worship by sea fairing men and women during midsummer and midwinter solstices. Sren Diinhoff of University Museum of Bergen tell dailymail. Com in email: 'A religious feast or blot, as it was called in the Viking Age, meant that animals were sacrificed and meat would be prepared for gods and ancestors. 'But, as gods could not eat meat and drink beer, tribe would do on behalf of them. 'On most important days of year, people would meet up at God's house and priest 'gode' would perform rituals and prayers to gods. ' animals would be slaughtered and meat prepared in cooking pits. Feast with eating meat and drinking would likely take place at manors hall building. ' Diinhoff and his team have been exciting this site on Ose farm near rsta, in Western Norway for around two months. Once complete, area is set to undergo construction for a new housing project. 'We have opened up around an acre on the site where farm Ose used to be. From written sources, this farm can be traced back into the Medieval Period, ' Diinhoff share in an email. 'It is therefore no surprise that we have found several buildings from the Early Medieval Period here. ' In fact, we have buildings here that date all way back into the Early Iron Age, almost 2500 years ago. ' We are also certain that we have a Late Iron Age farmhouse here. ' Experts have uncovered signs of pagan worship in the region over years, typically artifacts, but this is the first Old Norse temple discover. The temple is said to once have curve longside with slight round gables and at the center stand four posts. 'At this time we do not have any radiocarbon dating analyse, but architecture clearly testifies that building must be dated to the Late Iron Age and probably to the Viking Age, ' Diinhoff share. At other sites that find similar temples, archaeologists uncover sacrifice gold items. However, this ritual came to an end right before the Viking era began and the Norse transition to animal sacrifices. During these rituals, according to experts, blood of sacrificial animals was likely splashed over walls, statues of gods and party participants. 'As this building must be from the Viking Age there we cannot expect to find any gold items.

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* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Vikings HistorySymbols

Table

Runes (Norse Alphabet)Valknut (Knot of the Slain)
gishjalmr (Helm of Awe)Vegvisir (Viking Compass)
Triskele (Horns of Odin)Triquetra (Celtic Knot)
Mjolnir (Thor's Hammer)Viking Axe (Norse Weapon)
Yggdrasil (Tree of Life)Longship (Viking Ships)
Web of Wyrd (Fate)Gungnir (Odin's Spear)
Raven (Hugin and Munin)Wolf (Fenrir)
8-Legged Horse (Sleipnir)Dragon (Norse Serpents)
Boar (Nordic and Celtic)Cats, Bears (and more)

In Viking Age and for centuries thereafter in Scandinavia and Iceland, fearsome creatures lurk in forests, moors, and mountains. Anyone who happened to encounter them would say that they look perfectly human, but local villagers would instead insist that these outlaws-for such they were-were wild, uncivilized entities that had once been members of human society, but were so no longer. Viking political institutions had no executive branch-like police, for example-To enforce their laws. It was leave to the general populace to enforce them. Since laws were more or less just codification of social norms that people were expected to live by anyway, political leaders and legal assemblies typically had little problem getting people to enforce law themselves. This meant that there was no formal death penalty for those crimes Vikings consider worthy of execution. The list of which crimes fall into this category varies across the Viking World, but commonly includes such dastardly deeds as murder, rape, kidnapping, malevolent sorcery, highway robbery, and ni, ritual curse that often involved accusations of extreme sexual depravity. Instead of arresting and executing person found guilty of such crimes, Norse declared him outlaw. This meant that, as the term implies, he was outside the law; he no longer had any rights, all of his property was confiscate, and could be lawfully killed by anyone. In a culture where honor-base revenge killings were commonplace and considered to be proper, this was often effectively privatized death sentence. The only way outlaw could have this dread status revoked was to pay large sums of money to political officials. By end of the Viking Age and beginning of the Medieval period, these fines were important sources of revenue for them. In Iceland, and probably throughout the North World, there were two types or levels of outlawry. Full outlawry means that outlaw loses his right to live as a full member of society for the rest of his life. Full outlawry was also called skoggangr, word which literally means going into the forest. Full outlaw himself was called skogarmar, man of the forest. This refers to the fact that such outlaws, in order to escape weapons of their disgruntled former peers, usually flee to otherwise uninhabited wilderness areas or leave the country altogether. But there was also lesser outlawry, which means that this period of banishment was limited to three years rather than the rest of the offenders ' life. Apart from obvious physical hardships that come with being an outlaw, it is hard to overstate just how emotionally devastating it must have been. For Norse, law and society were virtually synonymous concepts. The Phrase var log, our law, was frequently used to refer to society itself.

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Vikings History Sagas and Stories

Viking culture was rich in stories, tales and poems. Kings, brave heroes, beautiful women, dangerous journeys, battles, fearsome dragons and otherworldly creatures were all subjects of tales told by Skalds and everyone else. In the Viking Age, no one wrote them down, but everyone knew them, mostly by heart. Long winters when people were cooped up inside were fertile soil for these stories of Old. For centuries, they were kept alive in the hearts of Scandinavians by storytellers. However, great literature of the Viking Age was in danger of being completely lost as time went BY, Old folks died and younger people didnt remember. Finally, with the advent of Christianity in Iceland, Christian churchmen taught Icelanders to write. Educate men in Iceland save all of it, from poetry to family legends and feuds, by writing it down. Most importantly, no one will now forget this rich heritage. Thanks to men like Snorri Sturluson, Icelandic writer, great flowering of Viking Age literature was produced in Iceland in the 13 century. Sturluson himself produced many of these works: Poetic Edda and Prose Edda, books about Norse mythology and heroes, Heimskringla, Book about the Kings of Norway, Scandinavian History and, most likely, Egils Saga. Sturluson was lawspeaker at Icelands Althing, poet, historian and politician. Most of what WE know about the Viking Age comes from these Icelandic collections of poems, tales, Sagas and stories. All of this Norse literature was written in the vernacular, language of Iceland, which was unusual for Medieval times. Latin was used by educated people and was the usual language used when writing anything from laws to fairy tales. Viking literature in vernacular is the only other body of writing in people's language besides Irish hero tales. Of Norse poetry, there are two varieties: Skaldic poetry and Eddaic poetry. Skalds were Viking poets and wrote complex, compelling verse usually honoring the king or patron. Eddaic poetry was anonymous and could be about anythingits. Subjects were humorus, scathing, bawdy, romantic, heroic or brusquely insulting. Sagas are stories, somewhat like historical fiction. While many of the characters and events are real, Saga writers take Poetic license in describing them. Events themselves take place a few hundred years before, which is why they should be considered fiction, not fact. Sagas are Prose, occasionally with Poetic stanzas in text. The subjects are tales of mens deeds, battles, journeys, feuds and fights. Subjects could be Christian or pagan, realistic or fantastic, tales of giants or saints or heroes or even regular people.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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