Advanced searches left 3/3
Search only database of 8 mil and more summaries

Barend Cornelis Koekkoek

Summarized by PlexPage
Last Updated: 01 December 2020

* If you want to update the article please login/register

General | Latest Info

Barend Cornelis Koekkoek

Born( 1803-10-11 ) October 11, 1803 Middelburg
DiedApril 5, 1862 (1862-04-05) (aged 58) Cleves
EducationAbraham Krayestein
Known forLandscape artist
NationalityDutch
Spouse(s)Elise Therese Koekkoek-Daiwaille ( m. 1833)

One of the most celebrated Dutch Landscape artists of the Nineteenth Century was Barend Cornelis Koekkoek. His works were typical of period landscape painting, which combine romantic feeling for nature with classically inspired manner, so that even when nature assumes dramatic form in the guise of gathering storm, brush is unmoved. Koekkoek become a much sought after Artist through his mountainous, forest and idyllic Woodland scenes, as well as his majestic oak trees, gathering thunderstorms, and masterful use of light. Barend Cornelis Koekkoek was born in 1803 in Middleburg, Netherlands into a family of artists. He received his first art instruction from his father, Johannes Hermanus Koekkoek, well-know marine Artist, and studied with Abraham Kraijestein at Middleburg Drawing Academy. In 1823, young Koekkoek enrol at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Amsterdam after being granted a scholarship of 300 guilders for three years by King Willem I. He studied there with Jan Willem Pieneman, mostly known for his contemporary history scenes of the Kingdom of Netherlands and for being teacher to an impressive group of artists, as well as with Jean Augustin Daiwaille, portrait painter and lithographer. After completing his studies at the Academy in 1826, Koekkoek moved to Hilversum, then to Beek before returning to Amsterdam in 1829. During that time, he travelled regularly in the surrounding countryside. His first success came in 1829, when he won the gold medal from the Felix Meritis Society in Amsterdam for his painting Landscape with Rainstorm Threatening. This early work was described as notable for its accurate and sober study of nature; It marks Koekkoeks commitment to the style of Landscape divorce from both the predominantly topographical approach of 18 Century and from the flat and decorative manner of contemporary mural painting. Moreover, in Poetry of Reality: Dutch Painters of Nineteenth Century, Guido Jansen writes that while Koekkoeks painting shows little consummate skill in rendering Woodland scenes which mark his later pieces and which won him recognition throughout Europe, yet in its presentation of nature, this work anticipates idyllic Woodland and mountainous scenes with which Artist won such renown in later years and for which he was to become most applauded Dutch Landscape Artist of his day. In 1833, Koekkoek married Elise Therese, daughter of Jean Augustin Daiwaille, his former instructor at the Art Academy in Amsterdam. A year later, they move to Germany and settle in the town of Cleves, located in hilly woodlands close to the Rhine basin. From there, he makes annual summer expeditions to other parts of Germany, Belgium and Luxembourg, and brings back many sketches, which he uses primarily as studies. However, unlike his fellow artists, Koekkoek does not reproduce these studies. Rather, he uses them as an indirect source of inspiration.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

Related video

10 December 2017Barend Cornelis Koekkoek (1803 - 1862) ✽ Dutch artist

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Career

Flat Dutch countryside could not satisfy Koekkoek's Romantic soul for very long. Surely, Koekkoek wrote in 1841, our fatherland boasts no rocks, waterfalls, high mountains or Romantic valleys. Proud, sublime nature is not to be found on our land. With that in mind, in the summer of 1834 he moved to the old Ducal capital of Cleves, Germany, where he found his ideal subject matter in the region of Ahr, Ruhr and Rhine. Soon, large oak trees, winding paths and panoramic views fill his paintings with an artful blend of minute detail and atmospheric mood. In Cleves, where he would spend the rest of his life, Koekkoek painted his most important landscapes, ranging from extensive River valleys to idyllic forest views dominated by one or more oaks. He often dramatizes his trees as a means to emphasize man's paltriness in comparison to nature. By 1841, Koekkoek had earned such regard from his fellow artists that he decided to publish a book of lessons for students, Herinneringen en Mededeelingen van eenen Landschapsschilder, in which he air view that artist must, above all, stay true to nature through meticulous observation and rigorous draughtsmanship. This seminal work takes the form of a leisurely journey along the Rhine, pointing out to readers various qualities of nature and landscape. Same year, by popular demand from young artists eager to receive his tuition, Koekkoek found his own drawing academy, and in his footsteps, many artists travel to former Ducal residence seeking instruction from great masters at the academy, among them Frederik Marinus Kruseman, Lodewijk Johannes Kleijn, and Johann Bernard Klombeck. Closely adhering to their master's principles expressed in his writings and in his paintings, these artists collectively give rise to the school of Landscape painting referred to as 'Cleves Romanticism', blending realism with pervading idealize atmosphere. He advises his students to study nature closely, to observe the quality of light at dawn and at sunset and the development of storms. He also guided his students in examination of Dutch seventeenth Century masters. The 1840s-50s saw Koekkoek at the very height of his genius. In November 1859, Koekkoek suffered from a major stroke which effectively ended his career as a painter. He died on April 5 1862, in his beloved town of Cleves.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Haus Koekkoek, Cleves

19th century Dutch painter Barend Cornelis Koekkoek is renowned all over the world. He is the most important representative of the largest dynasty of painters ever in the Netherlands. Across four generations, there were no less than sixteen artists in the Koekkoek family. The beginning of the 19th century marked the end of a long period of political turmoil in Europe. There was strong craving for social stability. In Art this resulted in the rise of a new movement: Romanticism. Although Romanticism contains many different themes, they share attention to emotional life and yearning to escape reality. Romanticism arose also as response to Classicism, which was viewed as being too cold and distant. Barend Cornelis Koekkoek grew up at a time when Romanticism was beginning to find its way into Dutch painting, although less so than in the rest of Europe. He was taught by his father, Johannes Hermanus. Barend Cornelis quickly decided to specialise in landscape painting. Following his sixteen year older colleague Andreas Schelfhout, Koekkoek developed into the best landscape painter the Netherlands has ever had. He masters depiction of figures, land, air, snow and ice to perfection. His technichal abilities are also illustrated by sophisticated light and magnificent depth effects in his paintings. He reached the peak of his career in the 1840s and early 1850s. Initially, the Koekkoeks landscape was flat and typically Dutch. However, because of study trips to Belgium, Luxembourg and Germany, young painters get acquaint with mountainous landscapes. This resulted in a turnaround in his work. Wooded, panoramic landscapes decorated with ruins or castles have become his trademark. These forest scenes with their golden sunlight, mighty oaks and streams and rivers with rocky beds often come across as foreign. Both his Dutch winter landscapes and his forest scenes in summer were popular with large audience, not only in the Netherlands but also far beyond. Koekkoek built a large international customer base. This includes noble clients such as King Friendrich-Wilhelm IV of Prussia and Tsar Alexander II of Russia. Dutch King Willem II owns eleven works by Koekkoek. Barend Cornelis was a highly esteemed and wealthy man, and he received many prizes, medals and honorary memberships. In 1834, Koekkoek moved from the Netherlands to Germany. He settled in the village of Kleef, just across the Dutch-German border, and would stay there for the rest of his life. The wooded area, including Reichswald nearby, was a great source of inspiration for Koekkoek. He had just pass age of thirty and thanks to his success he was already able to have manor build in Kleef. Here he found his own Art Academy in 1841, that would later become very well know. This is why Koekkoeks influence on 19th century Dutch Art was great, not solely because of his own works, but also because of his many students. Nowadays, the former residence of Barend Cornelis is Museum Haus Koekkoek.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

logo

Plex.page is an Online Knowledge, where all the summaries are written by a machine. We aim to collect all the knowledge the World Wide Web has to offer.

Partners:
Nvidia inception logo

© All rights reserved
2021 made by Algoritmi Vision Inc.

If you believe that any of the summaries on our website lead to misinformation, don't hesitate to contact us. We will immediately review it and remove the summaries if necessary.

If your domain is listed as one of the sources on any summary, you can consider participating in the "Online Knowledge" program, if you want to proceed, please follow these instructions to apply.
However, if you still want us to remove all links leading to your domain from Plex.page and never use your website as a source, please follow these instructions.