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Benign Brain Tumor Types

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Last Updated: 02 July 2021

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Site navigation utilizes arrow, enter, escape, and space bar key commands. Left and right arrows move across top level links and expand / close menus in sub levels. Up and Down arrows will open main level menus and toggle through sub tier links. Enter and space open menus and escape close them as well. Tab will move on to the next part of the site rather than go through menu items. A Brain Tumor, know as an intracranial Tumor, is an abnormal mass of tissue in which cells grow and multiply uncontrollably, seemingly unchecked by mechanisms that control normal cells. More than 150 different Brain Tumors have been document, but two main groups of Brain Tumors are term primary and metastatic. Primary Brain Tumors include tumors that originate from tissues of the brain or the brain's immediate surroundings. Primary Tumors are categorized as glial or non - glial and benign or malignant. Metastatic Brain Tumors include tumors that arise elsewhere in the body and migrate to the brain, usually through the bloodstream. Metastatic Tumors are considered cancer and are malignant. Metastatic Tumors to the Brain affect nearly one in four patients with Cancer, or an estimated 150 000 people a year. Up to 40 percent of people with lung Cancer will develop metastatic Brain Tumors. In the past, outcomes for patients diagnosed with these tumors were very poor, with typical survival rates of just several weeks. More sophisticated diagnostic tools, in addition to innovative surgical and radiation approaches, have helped survival rates expand up to years; and also allowed for improved quality of life for patients following diagnosis. Chordomas are benign, slow - growing tumors that are most prevalent in people ages 50 to 60. Their most common locations are the base of the skull and lower portion of the spine. Although these tumors are benign, they may invade adjacent bone and put pressure on nearby neural tissue. These are rare tumors, contributing to only 0. 2 percent of all primary Brain Tumors. Craniopharyngiomas are typically benign, but are difficult tumors to remove because of their location near critical structures deep in the brain. They usually arise from a portion of the pituitary gland, so nearly all patients will require some hormone replacement therapy. Gangliocytomas, gangliomas and Anaplastic gangliogliomas are rare tumors that include neoplastic nerve cells that are relatively well - differentiate, occurring primarily in young adults. Glomus jugulare Tumors are most frequently benign and typically are located just under Skull Base, at top of the jugular vein. They are the most common form of Glomus Tumor. However, Glomus Tumors, in general, contribute to only 0. 6 percent of neoplasms in the head and neck. Meningiomas are the most common benign intracranial tumors, comprising 10 to 15 percent of all brain neoplasms, although a very small percentage are malignant. These Tumors originate from meninges, membrane - like structures that surround the brain and spinal cord. Pineocytomas are generally benign lesions that arise from pineal cells, occurring predominantly in adults. They are most often well - define, noninvasive, homogeneous and slow - growing.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Overview

A Brain tumor is the mass or growth of abnormal cells in your brain. Many different types of brain tumors exist. Some brain tumors are noncancerous, and some brain tumors are cancerous. Brain tumors can begin in your brain, or cancer can begin in other parts of your body and spread to your brain. How quickly a brain tumor grows can vary greatly. The growth rate as well as location of the brain tumor determine how it will affect the function of your nervous system. Brain tumor treatment options depend on the type of brain tumor you have, as well as its size and location.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Symptoms

Signs and symptoms of brain tumor vary greatly and depend on the brain tumor's size, location and rate of growth. General signs and symptoms caused by brain tumors may include: new onset or change in pattern of headaches Headaches that gradually become more frequent and more severe Unexplained Nausea or vomiting Vision Problems, such as blurred Vision, double Vision or loss of peripheral Vision Gradual loss of sensation or movement in arm or leg Difficulty with Balance Speech difficulties Confusion in everyday matters Personality or behavior Changes Seizures, especially in someone who doesn't have history of Seizures Hearing Problems

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Risk factors

Cancer that has spread to the brain from another part of the body is called a metastatic brain tumor. Metastatic brain tumors are much more common than primary tumors. Symptoms of brain tumor depend on tumor size, type, and location. Symptoms may be caused when the tumor presses on nerve or harms part of the brain. Also, they may be caused when tumor blocks fluid that flows through and around the brain, or when the brain swells because of buildup of fluid. Most common early warning symptoms and signs of brain tumors include: new onset or change in pattern of headaches Headaches in Morning Headaches that gradually become more frequent and severe, Nausea and vomiting for no reason, Changes in speech, vision, or hearing, problems balancing or walking, Changes in mood, personality, or ability to concentrate Problems with memory Muscle jerking or twitching Numbness or tingling in arms or legs Gradual loss of sensation or movement in arm or leg Confusion in everyday matters Personality or behavior Changes most often, these symptoms are not due to Brain tumor. Another health problem could cause them. If you have any of these symptoms, you should tell your doctor so that problems can be diagnosed and treated early before they grow. Some people with brain tumors have seizures, especially in people who do not have a history of seizures. Doctors group brain tumors by grade. The Grade of tumor refers to the way cells look under the microscope: Grade I: tissue is benign. Cells look nearly like normal brain cells, and they grow slowly. Grade II: tissue is malignant. Cells look less like normal cells than do cells in Grade I tumor. Grade III: malignant tissue has cells that look very different from normal cells. Abnormal cells are actively growing. Grade IV: malignant tissue has cells that look most abnormal and tend to grow quickly. Cells from low - Grade tumors look more normal and generally grow more slowly than cells from high - Grade tumors. Over time, low - grade tumors may become high - grade tumor.S However, change to high - grade tumors happen more often among adults than in children. When you re told that you have a brain tumor, it's natural to wonder what may have caused your disease. But no one knows the exact causes of brain tumors. Doctors seldom know why one person develops a brain tumor and another doesn n't. Researchers are studying whether people with certain risk factors are more likely than others to develop brain tumor. Risk factors are something that may increase the chance of getting disease. Studies have found the following risk factors for brain tumors: Ionizing radiation: Ionizing radiation from high dose X - rays and other sources can cause cell damage that leads to tumor. People exposed to Ionizing radiation may have increased risk of brain tumor,s such as meningioma or glioma.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Schwannomas

Signs and symptoms of Schwannoma depend greatly on the location of the tumor. For schwannomas forming on peripheral nerves that are not cranial nerves, common signs or symptoms include the following: noticeable mass, or lump at the tumor site localize pain, numbness, or weakness. Patients with vestibular Schwannoma may experience different symptoms specific to the locations of these tumors: loss of hearing on one side, Buzzing or ringing in the ear, Dizziness or loss of balance, Facial numbness on one side, Facial weakness or paralysis on one side These symptoms result when the tumor compresses vestibulocochlear nerve, disrupting its function in relaying auditory or balance information. If the tumor becomes large enough, it may also begin compressing other nearby cranial nerves. For instance, compression of trigeminal nerve may cause facial numbness. Likewise, compression of facial nerve can cause facial weakness or paralysis. Typically, schwannomas only occur on one side, resulting in symptoms that affect either the left or right side of the body. For example, loss of hearing on one side. In some rare cases, schwannomas can develop on both sides, which would cause symptoms affecting both sides of the body. Schwannomas of sufficient size will be treated with surgery to remove as much of the tumor as possible. For vestibular schwannomas, this surgery is often performed by neurosurgeon working alongside otolaryngologist specializing in neuro - otology because approaches require removing bone and working around structures that are close to cranial nerves and structures involved in hearing. Very rarely, patients with schwannomas that are not vestibular schwannomas but arise instead from other cranial nerves, may be candidates for minimally invasive skull base surgery. This approach involves removing tumor endoscopically, using special tools and scopes that pass through small openings - in this case, nasal passages. Occasionally, depending on the size, number, and location of the tumor, radiation therapy may be suggested as an adjunct or alternative to surgery. Alternatively, if the tumor is small, slow - growing, and has few or no symptoms, then the patient may be observe, with surgery and / or radiation performed only when necessary. Schwannoma is a benign, slow - growing tumor that does not spread to other parts of the body. Patients with vestibular schwannomas usually have excellent outcomes. Radiosurgery has excellent results when treating small vestibular schwannomas and surgery is also typically sufficient to remove tumor and alleviate any symptoms. Schwannomas also rarely recur after complete surgical removal. The goals of therapy are always to maximize the degree of tumor control, alleviate existing symptoms, and preserve normal nerve functioning.


Schwannoma (grade 1)

Some patients will require surgery. In some cases, radio and / or chemotherapy may also be require. Conversely, some schwannomas grow so slowly that patients simply need to be monitored using regular scans, and may not require treatment. Some schwannomas can be completely removed by surgery, whilst others may be in positions in the brain where there is risk of causing harm. For example, if a patient has acoustic neuroma there may be a risk to their hearing and balance if surgery is undertaken. In these cases, priority for neurosurgeons will be to ensure that they remove as much of tumour as possible whilst avoiding any damage to these critical structures. If the tumour grows back, surgery may be offered again to reduce the tumour size again. Schwannoma stereotactic Radiotherapy: This is a highly targeted form of Radiotherapy that may be used to treat small schwannomas, dependent on their position. Schwannoma Radiotherapy: Radiotherapy is rarely used for slow - growing forms of schwannoma in order to avoid damage to delicate nerves that they are wrap around. For malignant or high - grade schwannomas, Radiotherapy would be used to help prevent recurrence after surgery. Schwannoma chemotherapy: It is rare to treat slow - growing schwannoma tumours using chemotherapy drugs. For malignant or high - grade schwannomas, cells will be dividing more rapidly and therefore, chemotherapy is likely to be offer. Molecular profiling of schwannoma: this can clarify the status of various genes, as well as the methylation profile of the tumour. Methylation means adding, removing or replacing methyl group on molecule that then influences the way in which molecules behave. There is a lot of research in schwannoma pathology at moment to clarify which molecular characteristics can be relied upon to guide treatment decisions. It also enables researchers to explore drugs that can target specific genetic mutations, leading in future towards more effective, personalised treatment protocols.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Continued

Terry Kennedy began her days giving thanks for her health. The 55 - year - old takes nothing for granted after facing significant challenges just a few years ago. March 27 2017, was a fairly routine day for Ann Arbor, Michigan, resident until she began to feel something was right. I wonder if I was having a stroke or heart attack, Kennedy recalls. Alone upstairs, she was able to call out to her husband, Tim, but that was all she remembers of events that follow. Tim races upstairs to find his wife in the middle of a tonic - clonic seizure, also know as grand mal seizure. Kennedy was taken by ambulance to Michigan Medicine Emergency Department, where an MRI revealed a golf ball size tumor identified as Meningioma. This type of benign, slow - growing tumor forms on membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord. Although some individuals do experience symptoms, common warning signs include seizures, dementia, difficulty with speech or vision or weakness on one side of the body. Until her seizure that day, Kennedy had no indication of a tumor growing inside her head. And now, seemingly out of nowhere, she finds herself facing brain surgery. The operation was scheduled for next week and would be performed by Michigan Medicine neurosurgeon B. Gregory Thompson, MD. Dr. Thompson performed difficult but successful surgery, said grateful Kennedy. But four weeks later, just before her scheduled return to work, she began to feel exhaust, off balance and nauseous. When her arm began to droop and her right leg became weak, she was directed by Thompson to go to the emergency room for another MRI. Mri showed fluid in the area where the tumor had been remove, Kennedy say. I was diagnosed with infection and was told by Dr. Thompson that I needed surgery immediately. The Kennedy infection represents unusual complication, said Thompson. Most infections begin on outside and are detected within seven to 10 days of surgery. This patient infection begins deep inside, making it difficult to detect. Neurosurgeon Aditya Pandey, MD, performed Kennedy surgery on April 21 2017, removing graft implant during first surgery as well as area known as bone flap as a precaution in case infection had spread. The plan was to replace the bone flap with a titanium plate at a later date. Until then, Kennedy would need to wear a helmet to protect his head. Kennedy remembers moments following her operation as somewhat surreal. As I was being wheeled from the operating room, someone kept saying, Mrs. Kennedy, move your right side. I realized then that I could move my right arm or leg. I was told there was 1% chance of something like this happening, she say. I knew I had to handle it. Follow up MRIs and X - rays did reveal the reason for what was diagnosed as paresis, partial loss of voluntary movement that can occur following surgical procedures such as Kennedys. We pray it was temporary, she say.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Gliomas

Gliomas grow in glial cells, which surround and support nerve cells in your brain and spinal cord. These Tumors affect both children and adults. But they are more common in adults. Men are slightly more likely to get Glioma than women. People with inherited diseases like NF1 or tuberous sclerosis are more likely to get them. Gliomas come in different grades based on how much they look like normal cells and how rapidly they grow: Grade 1: these cells look almost normal. They grow very slowly. Grade 2: bit of abnormality sets in. They can return after treatment as Higher Grade. Grade 3: cells reproduce quickly and are more aggressive than the first two grades. Grade 4: These cells look nothing like normal cells. They are very aggressive and grow very quickly.

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* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Brain tumors: an introduction

A brain tumor is the collection, or mass, of abnormal cells in your brain. Your skull, which enclose your brain, is very rigid. Any growth inside such restricted space can cause problems. Brain tumors can be cancerous or noncancerous. When benign or malignant tumors grow, they can cause pressure inside your skull to increase. This can cause brain damage, and it can be life - threatening. Brain tumors are categorized as primary or secondary. Primary brain tumor originates in your brain. Many primary brain tumors are benign. Secondary brain tumor, also know as metastatic brain tumor, occur when cancer cells spread to your brain from another organ, such as your lung or breast.

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* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Types of brain tumors

Symptoms of brain lesion depend upon what part of the brain is affect. Large parts of the brain can be involved in some diseases and there may be relatively few symptoms. Alternatively, very tiny lesions may be catastrophic if they occur in a critical part of the brain. Initial signs and symptoms of brain lesion are often non - specific and may include: worst headache of your life Nausea, Fever, neck pain and stiffness, vision, speech problems, and difficulty forming words Weakness or paralysis on one side of the body. Seizures, personality changes, loss of concentration, aggression and loss of personal control

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Are brain tumors cancerous?

Brain tumors account for one in every 100 cancers diagnosed annually in the United States. Most malignant brain tumors and brain cancers have spread from other tumors in the body to the skull, including cancers of breast and lung, malignant melanoma and blood cell cancers. Some brain tumors start in cells that support nerve cells of the brain, where they can crowd out normal cells and spread to other locations in the body. Tumors can either destroy tissue or cause problems in other parts of the body because of pressure tumor put on the brain. Brain tumors can be grouped by type of cell involved or by location in the brain. Metastasized cells may grow in one or several areas of the brain. Almost half of all brain tumors are non - cancerous, slow growing and respond well to treatment. Symptoms produced by brain tumors depend on their location, size, rate of growth and stage. Some nonmalignant brain tumors that grow slowly can become quite large before producing symptoms because there often is no swelling of brain tissues. However, because of their size or location, they cannot be easily remove, they can be as life threatening as malignant brain tumors. Persons who have symptoms that do not go away should see their doctor immediately. In general, brain cancer symptoms include: abnormal pulse and breathing rates can also occur. Deep, dull headaches that recur often and persist without relief for long periods of time. Difficulty walking or speaking Dizziness Eyesight problems, including double vision, Seizures Vomiting at late stages of disorder, dramatic changes in blood pressure may occur. Seizures are common symptom of benign brain tumors and slow - growing cancers. Tumors can cause part of the body to weaken or feel paralyzed. Hearing, sight and sense of smell can be affect. Persons who display personality changes and are prone to confusion and unable to think clearly require immediate medical attention. There are many different types of brain tumors, some of which can have several names. Even neuropathologists, who diagnose these brain tumors, are sometimes inconsistent with what they call them. Some of the most common types are: risk factors include exposure for long periods to ionizing radiation or to chemicals, such as vinyl chlorides, aromatic hydrocarbons, triazenes and N - nitroso compound. Generally, exposure occurs at place of work. Genetically inherited diseases, such as tuberous sclerosis and von Hippel - Lindau disease, may make people susceptible to brain tumors. Three out of five people who suffer from brain tumors are male. Brain tumors are most common in early or middle adult life, but they can appear at any age.


Symptoms

Symptoms of brain tumors vary according to type of tumor and location. Because different areas of the brain control different functions of the body, where tumor lies affects symptoms you get. Some tumors have no symptoms until they they large and then cause serious, rapid decline in health. Other tumors may have symptoms that develop slowly. Headaches, which may not get better with usual headache remedies. You may notice you getting them more often or theyare worse than usual. Seizures, particularly in people who do have a history of seizures. Changes in speech or hearing, Changes in vision, Balance Problems, Problems with walking, Numbness or tingling in arms or legs, Problems with memory, Personality Changes, Inability to concentrate, Weakness in one part of the body, Morning vomiting without nausea, These symptoms can result from many conditions. Don't assume you have a brain tumor just because you have some of the symptoms. Check with your doctor. Most of time, doctors ca tell what causes brain tumor. There are only a few known risk factors for brain tumors in adults. Exposure to radiation. Children who receive radiation to the head have a higher risk of developing brain tumors than adults. Family history. Some brain tumors are linked to certain rare genetic conditions such as neurofibromatosis or Li - Fraumeni syndrome. Age. People between the ages of 65 and 79 make up the population most likely to be diagnosed with brain tumor. No history of chickenpox. One study has found that people who had chickenpox are less likely to get gliomas.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Types of brain cancer

Astrocytomas, which are the most common CNS tumor, arise anywhere in the brain or spinal cord, and develop from small, star - shape cells called astrocytes. In adults, astrocytomas most often occur in the cerebrum, largest part of the brain. Cerebrum uses sensory information to tell us what is going on around us and how our body should respond. Cerebrum also controls speech, movement and emotions, as well as reading, thinking and learning. Brain stem gliomas are a type of astrocytoma that forms in the brain stem, which controls many vital functions, such as body temperature, blood pressure, breathing, hunger and thirst. The brain stem also transmits all signals to the body from the brain. The brain stem is in the lowest part of the brain and connects the brain and spinal cord. Tumors in this area can be difficult to treat. Most brain stem gliomas are high - grade astrocytomas. Glioblastoma multiforme, also know as glioblastoma, GBM or grade IV astrocytoma, is a fast - growing, aggressive type of CNS tumor that forms on supportive tissue of the brain. Glioblastoma is the most common grade IV brain cancer. Glioblastomas may appear in any lobe of the brain, but they develop more commonly in frontal and temporal lobes. Glioblastomas usually affect adults. Meningioma develops in cells of the membrane that surround the brain and spinal cord. Meningiomas account for approximately 15 percent of all intracranial tumors. Most of these tumors are benign. Meningiomas are typically removed with surgery. Some meningiomas may not need immediate treatment and may remain undetected for years. Most meningiomas are diagnosed in women between 30 and 50 years old. Aside from astrocytomas, there are a number of different primary brain tumors and other nervous system tumors that form from glial cells. They include: ependymomas, which usually occur in lining of the ventricles, or spaces in the brain and around the spinal cord. Although ependymomas may develop at any age, these brain cancer tumors are most common in children and adolescents. Ependymomas are also common spinal cord tumor.S Oligodendrogliomas develop in cells that produce myelin, fatty covering that protects nerves in the brain and spinal cord. These tumors are very rare, and usually occur in cerebrum. They are slow - growing and generally do not spread into surrounding brain tissue. These brain tumors occur most often in middle - aged adults. They generally have more favorable outcomes than astrocytomas. Mixed gliomas have two types of tumor cells: oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. This type of brain tumor most often forms in the cerebrum.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

What is a benign brain tumour?

Benign brain tumours can be serious if they are not diagnosed and treated early. Although they remain in one place and do not usually spread, they can cause harm by pressing on and damaging nearby areas of the brain. Many benign brain tumours can be surgically removed and don't come back once they have been remove, causing no further problems. However, grade 2 gliomas will often grow back after treatment and have the potential to change into high - grade or malignant tumours, which are fast - growing and likely to spread. This change is called mutation. Your treatment will depend on the type and location of tumour, and your outlook will depend on whether the tumour grows back and whether it mutate. Read more information about treating benign brain tumour.Sss

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

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