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Breast Cancer In Men

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Last Updated: 22 October 2020

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General | Latest Info

Although it is rare, men can get Breast Cancer. Learn about symptoms of Breast Cancer in men and things that may increase your risk. Breast Cancer is most often found in women, but men can get breast cancer too. About 1 out of every 100 breast cancers diagnosed in the United States is found in men. The most common kinds of breast cancer in men are the same kinds in women invasive ductal carcinoma. Cancer cells grow outside ducts into other parts of breast tissue. Invasive cancer cells can also spread, or metastasize, to other parts of the body. Invasive lobular carcinoma. Cancer cells spread from lobules to breast tissues that are close by. These invasive cancer cells can also spread to other parts of the body. Ductal carcinoma in situ is a breast disease that may lead to Breast Cancer. Cancer cells are only in the lining of ducts and have not spread to other tissues in the breast.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

What Are the Symptoms?

Treatment of male Breast Cancer, like that for women, depends on the patient's age, health and type and stage of cancer. Stage is determined by the size of tumor and whether it is in the breast, has reached lymph nodes of the armpit or has spread to the liver, brain, lungs or bones. Oncologists could suggest one treatment or multiple forms of treatments. Treatment often starts with surgery, which can be followed up by radiation, chemotherapy or hormone therapy. More treatments after surgery are decided on a case - by - case basis and depend on the person's health, age and other factors.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

What Are the Risk Factors?

Risk factor is anything that may increase your chance of having disease. Risk factors for certain types of cancer might include smoking, diet, family history, or many other things. The exact cause of someone's cancer may not be know. But risk factors can make it more likely for a person to have cancer. Risk factors can increase a person's risk, but they do not necessarily cause disease. Some people with 1 or more risk factors never develop Cancer. Other people can develop cancer and have no risk factors. Some risk factors are very well know. But there is ongoing research about risk factors for many types of cancer. Some risk factors, such as family history, may not be in your control. But others may be things you can change. Knowing risk factors can help you make choices that might lower your risk. For example, if an unhealthy diet is a risk factor, you may choose to eat healthy foods. If excess weight is a risk factor, your healthcare provider may check your weight or help you lose weight. Age Radiation exposure, such as Radiation that was used to treat another Cancer in the chest area Estrogen Treatment Diseases associated with high Estrogen levels and low levels of Male hormones, such as cirrhosis or Klinefelter syndrome, Heavy alcohol intake, Obesity Female relatives with Breast Cancer Breast Cancer 2 gene mutation in family

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Male breast tissue

Overall, 65 - 90% of neonates have breast tissue, which results from transfer of maternal and placental oestrogen and progesterone and persists up to several months. By age 14, up to 60% of boys have Gynaecomastia. This is usually resolved within one or two years. At puberty, surges of luteinising hormone and follicle stimulating hormone in conjunction with growth hormone and insulin - like growth factor - 1 stimulate testosterone production in Leydig cells. Oestrogen concentrations increase threefold, peaking earlier than testosterone concentrations that eventually increase up to 30 - fold. Whether Gynaecomastia results from relative delay in full testosterone production, temporary increase in aromatase activity, varying sensitivity to oestrogen, or all of these is uncertain. Gynaecomastia increases with age as free testosterone levels decline and obesity becomes more common table 1 1. 1 in an unselected group of men admitted to hospital, prevalence and diameter of breast enlargement was highly correlated with increasing body mass index. 2 Autopsy studies have found Gynaecomastia in 40 - 55% of unselected cases.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Where breast cancer starts

As breast cancer is usually associated with women, you may feel embarrassed about discussing your diagnosis. Talking openly about your cancer may be difficult, especially at first, but it may make it easier for people to support you. Talking is also part of the process of adjusting to what has happen. If you tell everyone you know, however, you might be overwhelmed or shocked by their reactions. Who you tell and how you tell them is up to you. Some people will find it difficult to know what to say to you. If you can bring the subject up first, it may help put them at ease while also making it easier for you. Telling people basic facts about your diagnosis and options for treatment can be a good way to begin and may lead naturally to talking about how you are feeling.


1. Can men get breast cancer?

A small number of men have a significant family history of breast cancer. This may be because they inherit altered genes that increase the risk of breast cancer. The most common altered genes are called BRCA1 and BRCA2. Brca2 is more commonly associated with breast cancer in men. If you have an altered gene, your risk of breast cancer increases. However, increased risk of breast cancer is still low and less than women in the general population. If you have children, they will have a 50% chance of inheriting altered gene. If youre concerned about your family history, first step is to talk to your GP.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

How breast cancer spreads

Breast Cancer can spread when cancer cells get into the blood or lymph system and are carried to other parts of the body. The lymph system is a network of lymph vessels found throughout the body. Lymph vessels carry lymph fluid and connect lymph nodes. Lymph nodes are small, bean - shaped collections of immune system cells. Lymph vessels are like small veins, except that they carry clear fluid called lymph away from the breast. The lymph contains tissue fluid and waste products, as well as immune system cells. Breast Cancer cells can enter lymph vessels and start to grow in lymph nodes. Most of lymph vessels of breast drain into: lymph nodes under arm, lymph nodes around collar Bone lymph nodes inside chest near breast bone


Stage 0 (ductal carcinoma in situ)

These cancers are still relatively small and either have not spread to lymph nodes or there are tiny areas of cancer spread in sentinel lymph node. The main treatment for stage I breast cancer is to remove it with surgery. This is usually done by mastectomy, but breast - conserving surgery might occasionally be an option. If breast - conserving surgery is done, it is usually followed by radiation therapy. Lymph nodes under the arm will be checked for cancer spread, either with axillary lymph node dissection or sentinel node biopsy. If the sentinel lymph node contains cancer, full ALND may be needed depending on the size of cancer in the lymph node as well as what other treatment is plan. Hormone therapy, chemotherapy and / or target therapy may be recommended as adjuvant therapy, based on tumor size and results of lab tests. Hormone therapy with tamoxifen is usually recommended for hormone receptor - positive tumors. Adjuvant chemo is commonly used for tumors larger than 1 cm across and some smaller tumors that may be more likely to spread. Men with HER2 - positive tumors may also receive targeted therapy with trastuzumab.


Stage IV (metastatic)

Stage IV cancers have spread beyond the breast and nearby lymph nodes to other parts of the body. Breast Cancer most commonly spreads to bones, liver, and lungs. As cancer progress, it may spread to the brain, but it can affect any organ and tissue. Systemic therapy is the main treatment for stage IV breast Cancer in men. Depending on many factors, this may be hormone therapy, chemo, target therapy, or some combination of these treatments. Radiation therapy and / or surgery may also be used in certain situations, such as: When breast tumor is causing open wound in the breast To treat small number of metastases in certain area, such as the brain To help prevent bone fractures When area of cancer spread is pressing on spinal cord To treat blood vessel blockage in liver To relieve pain or other symptoms if your doctor recommend such local treatments, it is important that you understand their goal, whether it is To try To cure Cancer or To prevent or treat symptoms. In some cases, regional chemo may be useful as well. Treatment to relieve symptoms depends on where the cancer has spread. For example, pain from Bone Metastases may be treated with external beam radiation therapy and / or bisphosphonates or denosumab. For more information, see Treating Bone Metastases.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Benign breast conditions

Benign breast conditions are unusual growths or other changes in breast tissue that are not cancer. Having benign breast condition can be scary at first because symptoms often mimic those caused by Breast Cancer. You or your doctor might be able to feel lump or see Nipple Discharge, or your mammogram might pick up something that requires further testing. Any abnormal change in the breast can be a sign of cancer and needs to be checked out. However, many changes turn out to be benign. In fact, benign breast conditions are quite common, even more common than Breast Cancer. Although benign breast conditions are cancer, some can increase your risk of eventually developing Breast Cancer. Experts often group benign conditions into three categories, according to whether they raise Breast Cancer Risk: no increase in Risk, slight increase in Risk, moderate increase in Risk you and your doctor can develop a follow - up plan that suits your diagnosis. Conditions that carry no increase and slight increase in Breast Cancer risk typically require no further action beyond usual Breast Cancer screening recommendations for women at average risk. For conditions that carry a moderate increase in Breast Cancer Risk, your doctor might suggest you get more frequent screenings with mammography and / or other imaging tests such as ultrasound or MRI scan. He or she also might recommend strategies for reducing your risk. If you have additional risk factors for Breast Cancer, such as strong family history, this can influence your action plan. These decisions have to be made on a case - by - case basis. Your doctor can help you understand your lifetime risk of Breast Cancer. This section includes information about some of the more commonly diagnosed Benign Breast conditions. Signs and symptoms of Benign Breast conditions Diagnosis of Benign Breast conditions Benign Breast conditions that do not increase Breast Cancer Risk Benign Breast conditions linked to slight increase in Breast Cancer Risk Benign Breast conditions linked to moderate increase in Breast Cancer Risk Benign Breast Changes due to inflammation, infections, pregnancy, and more Follow - up care for Benign Breast conditions


What is benign breast disease?

There are many different types of benign breast disease. Most of the following types do increase cancer risk and do require treatment: breast cysts: Up to a quarter of breast lumps are fluid - filled cysts. Breast cysts can be tender and lumpy, but they do make you more prone to cancer. Cysts often go away without treatment. Fibroadenomas: These are the most common noncancerous solid breast tumors found in women ages 15 to 35. Fibroadenomas do increase cancer risk and often go away on their own. Fibrocystic breast changes: Fluctuating hormone levels can make breasts feel lumpy, dense and tender, especially right before menstruation. Women aged 30 to 50 are more likely to experience fibrocystic breast changes, which go away without treatment. Hyperplasia: this condition occurs from overgrowth of cells that line mammary ducts or glands. A condition called usual hyperplasia doesnt increase cancer risk and doesnt require treatment. If you have atypical hyperplasia, your healthcare provider may recommend surgically removing affected breast tissue because the condition may make you more prone to breast cancer. Intraductal papilloma: these small, wart - like growths form inside a mammary duct near the nipple. Intraductal papilloma may cause nipple discharge. Condition most commonly affects women aged 30 to 50. Your risk of cancer goes up if you have five or more papillomas at one time. Surgery can remove these growths and reduce your cancer risk. Mammary duct ectasia: Menopausal and postmenopausal women are more prone to mammary duct ectasia. You may experience inverted nipple or nipple discharge when swollen, inflamed milk ducts are block. Also know as periductal mastitis, this condition does increase cancer risk. You may need antibiotics if a bacterial infection causes inflammation and blockage. Otherwise, you will need treatment. Traumatic fat necrosis: these breast lumps form when scar tissue replaces breast tissue that has been damaged by injury, surgery or radiation therapy. These lumps do raise cancer risk and do need treatment.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Causes

Breast cancer happens when certain cells in the breast become cancerous and form tumor. Men can have the same types of breast cancer as women. Seventy percent of male breast cancers are type called ductal carcinoma. Breast cancer in men is rare, but about 2 350 men find out they have breast cancer each year. About 440 people die of breast cancer each year. Like women's breast cancer, men's breast cancer can be cured or controlled if found early and treated right away. The first symptom that most men notice is painless lump. Other symptoms are: nipple discharge invert nipple sores on nipple or areola enlarge lymph nodes in underarms as with women, man's risk of breast cancer rises with age. Other risk factors for male breast cancer are: estrogen use conditions linked to rise of estrogen having been exposed to Radiation Testicular injury, Mumps orchitis Family history of breast cancer Family history of BRCA2 mutation on chromosome 13q Radiation exposure to chest, such as for Hodgkin's disease, Drinking too much alcohol Liver disease Obesity men are unlikely to check their breasts on routine basis and, when they notice symptoms, they are more likely than women to put off seeing physician. Men with breast cancer are most often diagnosed at a later age than women; normal age of diagnosis in men is 65. Causes and methods of prevention for breast cancer are not clear. The best way to protect against breast cancer is to find and treat disease at the earliest stage.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Male Breast Cancer

All people, whether male or female, are born with some breast cells and tissue. Even though males do not develop milk - producing breasts, mans breast cells and tissue can still develop cancer. Even so, male breast cancer is very rare. Less than one percent of all breast cancer cases develop in men, and only one in thousand men will ever be diagnosed with breast cancer. Breast cancer in men is usually detected as a hard lump underneath the nipple and areola. Men have higher mortality than women do, primarily because awareness among men is less and they are less likely to assume lump is breast cancer, which can cause delay in seeking treatment. The majority of men diagnosed are over the age of 50.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Diagnosis and Treatment

Your doctor may conduct a number of diagnostic tests and procedures, such as: clinical breast exam. A doctor uses his or her fingertips to examine your breasts and surrounding areas for lumps or other changes. Your doctor assess how large the lumps are, how they feel, and how close they are to your skin and muscles. Imaging tests. Imaging tests create pictures of your breast tissue that allow doctors to identify abnormal areas. Tests may include breast X - ray or ultrasound, which uses sound waves to create images. Removing samples of breast cells for testing. Biopsy is the only definitive way to make diagnosis of breast cancer. During biopsy, your doctor uses a specialized needle device guided by X - ray or another imaging test to extract the core of tissue from suspicious area. Biopsy samples are sent to a laboratory for analysis where experts determine whether cells are cancerous. Biopsy samples are also analyzed to determine the type of cells involved in breast cancer, aggressiveness of cancer, and whether cancer cells have hormone receptors or other receptors that may influence your treatment options. Other tests and procedures may be recommended depending on your particular situation.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

When to see your GP

Lump in your breast any other worrying symptoms, such as nipple discharge history of Breast Cancer in members of your family and you re worried about your chances of getting it. It's very unlikely you have Cancer, but it's best to get your symptoms check. Your GP will examine your breast and can refer you for tests and scans for Breast Cancer if needed. If you do not have symptoms but have a clear family history of Breast Cancer, your GP may refer you to a genetic specialist to discuss your risk of getting it. There are some inherited genes that increase your risk of cancer and blood tests can be done to check for these. Read about testing for cancer risk genes.


Outlook for breast cancer in men

Family and friends can be good sources of support. Its helpful for family and friends to know how you want to deal with things and how they can best respond to your needs. You can talk to your breast care nurse, treatment team or GP about any concerns you have. You may feel isolated if you do not know any other men in the same situation. You can talk on the phone or by email to another man who has had breast cancer through our Someone Like Me service. Walk Walk charity has a monthly virtual meet - up for men diagnosed with breast cancer. All men with a history of breast cancer diagnosis, who are English - speaking, and based in convenient time - zone are welcome.


When deciding on a treatment plan

The goal of surgery is to remove the tumor and surrounding breast tissue. Procedures include: removing all of breast tissue. Surgeon removes all of your breast tissue, including your nipple and areola. Removing a few lymph nodes for testing. Doctor identifies lymph nodes most likely to be the first place your cancer cells would spread. Those few lymph nodes are removed and analyze. If no cancer cells are find, there is a good chance that your breast cancer hasn't spread beyond your breast tissue. If cancer is find, additional lymph nodes are removed for testing.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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