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British jazz

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Last Updated: 06 January 2021

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First-rate music is incredibly raw, energetic and danceable, and reflects many cultures that have come together in the United Kingdom in an exciting way. This is partly due to the birthing ground of this scene: clubs. These past decades, many innovative British jazz acts started out in the nightlife scene, and vigorous radio shows with daring programming play an important role, too, like Gilles Peterson Worldwide or digital station Boiler Room. And this is still true these days: one cannot ignore British jazz, which is noticeable at festival. Contemporary UK acts are very aware that jazz is not about copying other people playing, but rather about finding your own voice. This is thanks to bassist Gary Crosby and his workshop Tomorrows Warriors, in which many British artists have participate. Take, for instance, drummer Moses Boyd. This very keen young dog keeps popping up everywhere and is never boring; his playing can lift your mood. You have to hear saxophonist Nubya Garcia at least once, just like her slightly older colleague Shabaka Hutchings, who is ringleader of scene with Sons of Kemet. The Band's latest album appears on Impulse, John Coltranes old label, and its suitable working ground for the intense tenor sound of Hutchings. In Sons of Kemet one can also find tuba player Theon Cross: exceptional phenomenon on this instrument. On Friday, music from ten-year-old, high-quality label Edition Records will be perform. Edition continues the strong British tradition of modern concertante jazz that recognizes no national borders. Its trend is followed by a long line of musicians like John Surman, Kenny Wheeler and John McLaughlin. Do-it-yourself-label Edition was found by pianist Dave Stapleton. He plays keyboards in Slowly Rolling Camera, band that titillates senses in a cinematographic atmosphere with urban elements. Then there is Dinosaur, by trumpeter Laura Jurd, with its crisp, unique sounds, and bassist Jasper Hiby, who, with Fellow Creatures, is a master at building long, captivating spells of musical tension. On Saturday, Darling will feel like a vibrant club in London or Manchester where exhilarating bands play with tribal intensity well into the early hours. Their jazz is steep in influences like dub, afro beat and grime; all play with contagious expressive freedom.

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The early 20th century

Jazz in Britain is usually said to have begun with the British tour of Original Dixieland Jazz Band in 1919. That state, British popular music aficionados in the 1920s generally preferred terms hot or straight dance music to the term Jazz. Jazz in Britain also faces similar difficulty to Brazilian Jazz and French Jazz, namely it tends to be seen by figures of authority as bad influence, but in Britain concern that Jazz was from the United States appears to have been less important than in France or Brazil. Instead, those who object to it do so more because they deem it riotous or unnerving. One of the earliest popular Jazz dance bands was that of Fred Elizalde, who broadcast on BBC from 1926 to 1929. By the early 1930s, music journalism in Britain, notably through Melody Maker, had created appreciation of the importance of leading American Jazz soloists and was beginning to recognise improvising talents of some local musicians. During the 1930s, most British Jazz musicians made their living in dance bands of various kinds. Jazz has become more important, and more separate than its own genre. Louis Armstrong played residencies in London and Glasgow in 1932, followed in subsequent years by Duke Ellington Orchestra and Coleman Hawkins. But local jazz culture was limited to London, where: Jazz was played after hours in a couple of restaurants that encouraged musicians to come in and jam for drinks. The Groups of Nat Gonella and Spike Hughes gained profile in Britain early in the decade; Hughes was even invited to New York to arrange, compose and lead what, in effect, was Benny Carter's Orchestra of time. Carter himself worked in London for the BBC in 1936. West Indian swing Band leader Ken snakehips Johnson and Leslie Thompson, Jamaican trumpeter, influenced Jazz in Britain, with the Band front by Johnson-Emperors of Jazz-being first large Black Band of note. Johnson went on to form one of the top swing bands in the country, known as West Indian Orchestra, which became resident band at the fashionable London venue Cafe de Paris, and it was here that Johnson was among those killed by German bomb during the Blitz in the early days of war.

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The 1960s and '70s

John Coltrane, Freddie Hubbard, Dewey Johnson, John Tchicai, Marion Brown, Archie Shepp, Pharoah Sanders, McCoy Tyner, Jimmy Garrison and Elvin Jones. Rec. 1965 still unruly, flaw, controversial, and deeply divisive album 40 years after its initial release, Ascension set pace and Tone of avant-garde music debate right through back of 1960s, quickly becoming a cutting-edge touchstone across arts-even John Lennon told interviewers, Of course, Ive heard Ascension when asserting his Late 1960s intellectual credentials alongside Yoko. Today, music remains testingly difficult, hell-hot fire and chaos from Tranes supporting musicians clear indication of the times it was made in, yet it titanic date that changed Jazz forever.

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1980s to the present

The 1980s saw continuing development of distinctive styles. There was a new generation of Black British musicians who helped to re-energise the UK Jazz scene, With Courtney Pine, Ronny Jordan, Gary Crosby, Julian Joseph, Cleveland Watkiss, Steve Williamson, Orphy Robinson, and later Denys Baptiste, Soweto Kinch and Jason Yarde being noteworthy examples. Loose Tubes was also a very important group in re-energising the British scene. Many musicians from this band, including Django Bates, Iain Ballamy and Julian Arguelles, have also become important artists with highly developed individual musical voices. In the early 1990s, acid jazz groups such as Incognito and Brand New Heavies were popular. The Expansion of Jazz was also Mark by the launch of Jazz FM in 1990 and the opening of Jazz Cafe, based in Camden Town, London. Both of these gradually ceased to concern themselves primarily with Jazz and the radio station was renamed Smooth FM in 2005. The new national digital Jazz radio station Jazz began operations At Christmas 2006, dedicated to broadcasting Jazz in most styles, but was closed by its parent company in February 2008. However, new venues continue to open. In recent years, funk and hip hop have become an influence on parts of Britain's jazz scene. At the same time, Black British traditions in Jazz have been strengthen, in part, by rediscovery and celebration in the 2000s of Jamaican altoist Joe Harriott's once-neglect music and by publication of books about him and his close collaborator, bassist Coleridge Goode. The effect has been to make Harriott, posthumously, powerful symbol of Black British Jazz achievement and identity. A new generation of Electro-Jazz artists such as KT Reeder have sought to redefine Jazz through using advanced computer software and acoustic instruments. There are more opportunities now for students to specialise in Jazz, whether at basic learner level or at major conservatoires around the country, such as the Royal Academy Of Music, Guildhall School Of Music, Trinity College Of Music and Middlesex University in London, Birmingham Conservatoire and Leeds College Of Music. Jazz Music education and artist development is also undertaken by organisation Tomorrow's Warriors, founded in 1991 by Janine Irons and Gary Crosby, With alumni going on to win several awards.

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British jazz musicians

However, Harriott and his fellow-travellers were not the first to do this. The Music of Pre-War jazz became a major form of popular music via dance bands, and this was due to the earlier influx of Caribbean jazz musicians who had enriched the British swing scene. To jazz followers, however, it means arrival of the Jamaican alto saxophonist, Joe Harriott and other modern musicians who rode the wave of emigration to find professional opportunities in England. Er, Harriott and his fellow-travellers were not the first to do this. The Music of Pre-War jazz became a major form of popular music via dance bands, and this was due to the earlier influx of Caribbean jazz musicians who had enriched the British swing scene. Most of these earlier jazz pioneers were linked to the ill-fat late-1930s dance orchestra of Ken Johnson, considered by many to be the swingiest swing band in Britain.

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UK jazz vs US jazz

Louis Armstrong once praised Lyttleton as being that cat in England who swings his ass off!. This care-free image is a fair summary of a man who, during the Second World War, came ashore during allied landings in Salerno, Italy, with a pistol in one hand and trumpet in the other. Its clear then, that this guy takes his Jazz very seriously. However, it was after his service that he met one of the catalysts of Britain's post-War Jazz boom, George Webb, He joined Webb's Dixielanders and began his career proper. Later, Lyttleton would be a forerunner in the revival of more traditional forms of Jazz. Recording With Sydney Bechet; making that low, bluesy Jazz that drag its rhythmic feet purposefully; then creating the track he is best known for, Bad Penny Blues, contrast to his work With Sydney, capturing a more upbeat, finger snappin personality but still with bluesy chords and his sharp, distinctive staccato trumpet work. Moreover, it was the formation of his own, Lyttleton Band, that brought success to Jazz revival on a national scale. Despite this being the peak of his career, Lyttleton remained active and, like Ronnie Scott, was an important ambassador for Jazz, not being swayed by popular forms and choosing to stick to his guns. For Fans of: Original Dixieland Jazz Band, Sydney Bechet Listen to: Bad Penny Blues, Beale Street Blues, High Society, When Its Sleepy Time Down South, Georgia on My Mind

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Finn Peters

Flutist and saxophonist Finn Peters is one of the most remarkable musicians on the British jazz scene. He is an extraordinarily versatile young talent. In 2006, his album Su-Ling made quite a splash in the British media. Leading Jazz magazine Jazzwise call CD 'a work of poise and maturity'. Peters, who was born in Devon, first studied at Durham University before transferring to the Jazz program at Guildhall School of Music in London. Immediately after completing his studies, he went on tour with soul star Jhelisa Anderson. In the years that followed, he regularly popped up working with house DJs, and also explored funk, and Latin and classical music. Although in recent years the majority of his more commercial music was heard on dance floors with Su-Ling he returned to true Jazz. And with success: last year Finn's Finntett won the BBC Jazz Award For Best Band.

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Alexander Hawkins

In All Seriousness publishes the work of Alexander Hawkins, emerging composer, broadcaster and in-demand pianist, who leads Alexander Hawkins Ensemble, co-lead transatlantic Convergence Quartet and is regular collaborator of legendary South African drummer Louis Moholo-Moholo. You can see Hawkins perform alongside Louis Moholo-Moholo at Vortex as part of the EFG London Jazz Festival. Hawkins music has been broadcast extensively on BBC Radio, as well as in Europe and beyond. In 2012 he was commissioned by BBC Radio 3 to compose One Tree find, 50 minute work with Baroque roots For Jazz octet that explores parallels between two genres and draws inspiration from the 18 century in a looser, more abstract way. Hawkins put together a bespoke band of free-improvising musicians, writing music with individual players in mind. Work premiered in February 2013 at Cafe OTO in London and was broadcast on BBC Radio 3 in March For Baroque Spring series. His next new work will be commission For Alexander Hawkins Trio and will premiere at Forge as part of the EFG London Jazz Festival.

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* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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