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Cancerous Moles

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Last Updated: 02 July 2021

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General | Latest Info

Skin Cancer is by far the most common type of cancer. Nearly all skin cancers can be treated effectively if they are found early, so knowing what to look for is important. There are many types of skin cancer, each of which can look different on the skin. This picture gallery contains some examples of more common types of skin cancer, as well as some other non - cancerous types of skin growth. But skin cancers can look different from these examples. This is why it is important to see a doctor if YOU have any lumps, bumps, spots, sores, or other marks on your skin that are new or changing, or that worry YOU for any other reason.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Signs and symptoms of melanoma

To help you identify characteristics of unusual moles that may indicate Melanomas or other skin cancers, think of the letters ABCDE: is for asymmetrical shape. Look for moles with irregular shapes, such as two very different - looking halves. B is for irregular border. Look for moles with irregular, notch or scallop borders characteristics of Melanomas. C is for changes in color. Look for growths that have many colors or uneven distribution of color. D is for diameter. Look for new growth in moles larger than 1 / 4 inch. E is for evolving. Look for changes over time, such as moles that grow in size or that change color or shape. Moles may also evolve to develop new signs and symptoms, such as new itchiness or bleeding. Cancerous moles vary greatly in appearance. Some may show all of the changes listed above, while others may have only one or two unusual characteristics.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Early warning signs of melanoma

The first sign of melanoma is typically a new spot on the skin, or change in size, shape or color of existing mole. The ABCDE method may help you determine whether abnormal skin growth may be melanoma: symmetry: mole has irregular shape. B order: edge is not smooth, but irregular or notch. C olor: mole has uneven shading or dark spots. D iameter: spot is larger than the size of a pencil eraser. E volving or E levation: spot is changing in size, shape or texture. The only way to be sure if a mole has melanoma is to have it examined by a doctor. Sores that do not heal Pigment, redness or swelling that spreads outside the border of spot to surrounding skin Itchiness, tenderness or pain, changes in texture, or scales, oozing or bleeding from existing mole Blurry vision or partial loss of sight, or dark spots in iris because cancer symptoms varyand not all melanomas develop from molesit is important to discuss new or unusual skin growths with your doctor. Although many melanomas develop in areas exposed to the sun, they may also develop in areas that are usually hidden from the sun. In addition to examining legs, trunk, arms, face and neck, it is important to look at areas between toes, underneath fingernails and toenails, on palms of hands, soles of feet, genitals and even eyes.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Moles

A normal mole is usually evenly colored brown, tan, or black spot on the skin. It can be either flat or raise. It can be round or oval. Moles are generally less than 6 millimeters across. Some moles can be present at birth, but most appear during childhood or young adulthood. New moles that appear later in life should be checked by a doctor. Once a mole has develop, it will usually stay the same size, shape, and color for many years. Some moles may eventually fade away. Most people have moles, and almost all moles are harmless. But it is important to recognize changes in the mole - such as in its size, shape, color, or texture - that can suggest Melanoma may be developing.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

See a dermatologist

Examine your skin with a mirror. Pay close attention to areas of your skin that are often exposed to the sun, such as hands, arms, chest, and head. Following ABCDEs are important signs of moles that could be skin cancer. If a mole displays any of the signs listed below, have it checked immediately by a dermatologist: asymmetry: One half of the mole does not match the other half Border: Border or edges of mole are rag, blur, or irregular color: mole has different colors or it has shades of tan, brown, black, blue, white, or red Diameter: Diameter of mole is larger than eraser of pencil Evolving: mole appear different from others and / or changing in size, Color, shape keep in mind that some melanomas may be smaller or not fit other characteristics. You should always be suspicious of new mole. If you do notice new mole, see your dermatologist as soon as possible. He or she will examine the mole and take a skin biopsy. If it's skin cancer, biopsy can show how deeply it has penetrated skin. Your dermatologist needs this information to decide how to treat the mole. The most common location for melanoma in men is the back; in women, it is the lower leg.


Skin Cancer Screening Schedule

Skin cancer screening is a visual exam of skin that can be done by yourself or health care provider. Screening checks skin for moles, birthmarks, or other marks that are unusual in color, size, shape, or texture. Certain unusual marks may be signs of skin cancer. Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the United States. The most common types of skin cancer are basal cell and squamous cell cancers. These cancers rarely spread to other parts of the body and are usually curable with treatment. The third type of skin cancer is called melanoma. Melanoma is less common than other two, but more dangerous because it's more likely to spread. Most skin cancer deaths are caused by melanoma. Skin cancer screening can help find cancer in its earlier stages when it's easier to treat.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Overview

Melanoma, most serious type of skin cancer, develops in cells that produce melanin pigment that gives your skin its color. Melanoma can also form in your eyes and, rarely, inside your body, such as in your nose or throat. The exact cause of all melanomas isn't clear, but exposure to ultraviolet radiation from sunlight or tanning lamps and beds increases your risk of developing melanoma. Limiting your exposure to UV radiation can help reduce your risk of melanoma. The risk of melanoma seems to be increasing in people under 40, especially women. Knowing warning signs of skin cancer can help ensure that cancerous changes are detected and treated before cancer has spread. Melanoma can be treated successfully if it is detected early.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Causes

Moles are very common, and most people have one or more. Moles are concentrations of pigment - producing cells in your skin. People with light skin tend to have more moles. The technical name for mole is nevus. It comes from the Latin word for birthmark. Cause of moles isnt well understood. It is thought to be an interaction of genetic factors and sun damage in most cases. Moles usually emerge in childhood and adolescence, and change in size and color as you grow. New moles commonly appear at times when your hormone levels change, such as during pregnancy. Most moles are less than 1 / 4 inch in diameter. Mole colors range from pink to dark brown or black. They can be anywhere in your body, alone or in groups. Almost all moles are benign. But new moles in adults are more likely to become cancerous than old moles. If a new mole appears when youre older, or if mole changes in appearance, you should see a dermatologist to make sure it is not cancerous.


Types of moles

These moles are called birthmarks and vary widely in size, shape, and color. About 0. 2 to 2. 1 percent of infants are born with congenital mole. Some birthmarks may be treated for cosmetic reasons when child is older,. For example, aged 10 to 12 and better able to tolerate local anesthetic. Treatment options include: surgery skin resurfacing skin shaving of top skin layers, chemical peel for lightening, laser ablation for lightening larger congenital moles have greater risk of becoming malignant in adulthood. Changes in growth, color, shape, or pain of birthmark should be evaluated by a doctor.


Is there scarring from mole removal?

Yes, there is a small chance that mole can recur after mole surgery. It is important to understand that no surgery has a 100% cure rate. A few mole cells may remain in the skin and may recur in the same or adjacent area. Some moles are more aggressive than others and need additional treatment and closer follow - up. Good follow - up appointments with physician are very important, especially in the first few years after irregular mole removal. Many people see their physician every six to 12 months after their diagnosis of atypical moles. Patients with more aggressive moles or moles in high - risk areas may need more regular follow - up appointments. A physician will recommend proper follow - up for someone's specific condition.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Risk factors

Having less pigment in your skin means you have less protection from damaging UV radiation. If you have blond or red hair, light - colored eyes, and freckles or sunburn easily, you are more likely to develop Melanoma than someone with a darker complexion. But Melanoma can develop in people with darker complexions, including Hispanic people and black people. History of sunburn. One or more severe, blistering sunburns can increase your risk of Melanoma. Excessive ultraviolet light exposure. Exposure to UV radiation, which comes from the sun and from tanning lights and beds, can increase the risk of skin cancer, including Melanoma. Living closer to the equator or at higher elevation.S People living closer to earth's equator, where the sun's rays are more direct, experience higher amounts of UV radiation than do those living farther north or south. In addition, if you live at high elevation,s you are exposed to more UV radiation. Having many moles or unusual moles. Having more than 50 ordinary moles on your body indicates an increased risk of Melanoma. Also, having an unusual type of mole increases the risk of Melanoma. Know medically as dysplastic nevi, these tend to be larger than normal moles and have irregular borders and a mixture of colors. Family history of Melanoma. If a close relative such as a parent, child or sibling has had Melanoma, you have a greater chance of developing Melanoma, too. Weaken immune system. People with weakened immune systems have an increased risk of Melanoma and other skin cancers. Your immune system may be impaired if you take medicine to suppress your immune system, such as after organ transplant, or if you have a disease that impairs your immune system, such as AIDS.


Family history

Some families tend to have large numbers of moles, or moles that are unusual. Atypical moles tend to be irregular shape or colour and may be larger than usual. An inherited condition called familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome increases your risk of getting melanoma. Many moles, some of which are unusual and often different sizes, at least one close relative who's had melanoma. Some families with FAMMM are also at higher risk of developing pancreatic cancer. Scientists think that around 10 out of 100 cases of melanoma might be linked to inherited faulty genes. A gene called CDKN2A is known to cause FAMMM. For the small number of families who carry these genes, sun protection is even more important.


Familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome (FAMMM)

Mole is a benign pigmented tumor. Babies are not usually born with moles; they often begin to appear in children and young adults. Having many Moles: Most Moles will never cause any problems, but someone who has many Moles is more likely to develop Melanoma. Atypical Moles: these Moles look little like normal Moles but also have some features of Melanoma. They are often larger than other moles and have abnormal shape or color. They can appear on skin that is exposed to the sun as well as skin that is usually cover, such as on buttocks or scalp. Dysplastic nevi often run in families. A small percentage of dysplastic nevi may develop into melanomas. But most dysplastic nevi never become cancer, and many melanomas seem to arise without pre - existing dysplastic nevus. Dysplastic nevus syndrome: People with this inherited condition have many dysplastic nevi. If at least one close relative has had Melanoma, this condition is referred to as familial atypical multiple mole and Melanoma syndrome, or FAMMM. People with this condition have a very high lifetime risk of Melanoma, so they need to have very thorough, regular skin exams by a dermatologist. Sometimes full body photos are taken to help doctors recognize if moles are changing and growing. Many doctors recommend that these patients be taught to do monthly skin self - exams as well. Congenital melanocytic nevi: Moles present at birth are called congenital melanocytic nevi. The life risk of Melanoma developing in congenital melanocytic nevi is estimated to be between 0 and 5%, depending on the size of nevus. People with very large congenital nevi have higher risk, while risk is lower for those with small nevi. For example, risk for Melanoma is very low in congenital nevi smaller than palm of hand, while those that cover large portions of back and buttocks have significantly higher risks. Congenital nevi are sometimes removed by surgery so that they do not have a chance to become cancer. Whether doctors advise removing congenital nevus depends on several factors, including its size, location, and color. Many doctors recommend that congenital nevi that are not removed should be examined regularly by a dermatologist and that patients should be taught how to do monthly skin self - exams. Again, chance of any single mole turning into cancer is very low. However, anyone with lots of irregular or large moles has an increased risk of Melanoma.


General

Immune suppression: Conditions that weaken the immune system, such as viruses, diseases or immune suppression therapy associated with organ transplantation, may increase skin cancer risks.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Prevention

New or enlarging moles may be worrisome, and dermatologist should evaluate these promptly. While moles may increase in size, particularly before the age of 20, regular moles are unlikely to enlarge as people get older. A mole that has increased in size is not necessarily cancerous. Enlargement alone does not necessarily mean the mole is malignant. Some regular moles may increase in size and darken in pregnancy. Often, simple mole biopsy by a doctor can help determine if a mole is irregular. Regular moles pose essentially little to no health risk. It is not necessary to remove all the moles. The vast majority of moles are not cancerous and generally do not become cancerous. However, it may be necessary for a pathologist to remove and examine any moles that are changing, growing, new, symptomatic, or bleeding. Periodic monitoring and medical evaluation of moles is important to help determine which moles need to be remove.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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