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Chest Cold Vs Head Cold

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Last Updated: 02 July 2021

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General | Latest Info

The effects of cold can vary between individuals and specific type of virus causing infection. Typical symptoms of a cold include sneezing, coughing, sore throat, fatigue, and runny or stuffy nose. Colds are very contagious. They can occur at any time of year but are most common during winter, especially during damp, rainy weather. You can get cold by inhaling cold virus, such as when someone who has a cold sneezes nearby. You can also get cold by touching your eyes, nose or mouth after you have touched surface that is contaminated with cold virus. There is no cure for common cold, but you can find relief by getting plenty of rest, drinking fluids, using Over - counter cough drops, or taking Over - counter cold medicines. In most cases, cold is a mild, self - limiting disease that resolves by itself over a week or two. Antibiotics do not cure colds and do not shorten their course, so they should not be used for common cold. Most people in good health can recover from common cold without complications. In some cases, common cold can lead to more serious infections and complications, such as pneumonia, acute bronchitis, and worsening of asthma. People at risk for complications include those who have chronic disease, immunodeficiency disorder, suppressed or compromised immune system, and very young and very old. Seek prompt medical care if you have a chronic disease and develop symptoms of a cold or if you have a cold that is not getting better. Seek immediate medical care if you, or someone you are with, have symptoms of a cold accompanied by shortness of breath, wheezing, chest pain, or change in alertness or consciousness. Symptoms of common cold are generally mild and appear two to three days after exposure to the cold virus. Symptoms can vary depending on the specific type of virus causing the cold. Common cold symptoms include: body ache, Cough Fatigue, headache, Low - grade fever, Post - nasal drip, Runny nose, Sneezing Sore throat, Stuffy nose or nasal congestion, Watery eyes in some cases, cold can result in serious complications, such as pneumonia or Acute bronchitis. Call 911 or seek immediate medical care if you, or someone you are with, are experiencing any of the following symptoms: change in alertness or level of consciousness Chest pain Deep, wet Chest Cough that produces yellow, green or brownish phlegm High fever, lethargy or unresponsiveness, Shortness of breath Wheezing, whistling sound make with breathing with first signs of cold you may wonder if you caught cold or flu. Symptoms of cold and flu can be similar. So what is the difference? When you have a cold, symptoms are generally mild and include runny nose, sneezing, nasal congestion, and possibly low - grade fever below 101 degrees Fahrenheit. When you have the flu, you may have the same symptoms, but you will probably experience more severe and uncomfortable symptoms.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

How to Feel Better

Like all viruses, those that cause colds have to run their course. Getting plenty of rest and drinking lots of fluids can DO as much good as Medicine as far as helping someone with a cold feel better. Whether you feel like sleeping around clock or just taking things a bit easier, pay attention to what your body is telling you when you have a cold. A warm bath or heating pad can soothe aches and pains, and steam from a hot shower can help you breathe more easily. Don't worry about whether to feed cold or starve fever. Just eat when you are hungry. And you might have heard that chicken soup can cure a cold. There's no real proof of this, but sick people have been swearing by it for more than 800 years.


Cold remedies that work

If you catch a cold, you can expect to be sick for one to two weeks. That doesn't mean you have to be miserable. These remedies might help you feel better: stay hydrate. Water, juice, clear broth or warm lemon water with honey help loosen congestion and prevent dehydration. Avoid alcohol, coffee and caffeinated sodas, which can make dehydration worse. Rest. Your body needs rest to heal. Soothe sore throat. Saltwater gargling 1 / 4 to 1 / 2 teaspoon salt dissolved in an 8 - ounce glass of warm water can temporarily relieve sore or scratchy throat. Children younger than 6 years are unlikely to be able to gargle properly. You can also try ice chips, sore throat sprays, lozenges or hard candy. Use caution when giving lozenges or hard candy to children because they can choke on them. Don't give lozenges or hard candy to children younger than 6 years. Combat stuffiness. Over - counter saline nasal drops and sprays can help relieve stuffiness and congestion. In infants, experts recommend putting several saline drops into one nostril, then gently suctioning that nostril with a bulb syringe. To do this, squeeze the bulb, gently place the syringe tip in nostril about 1 / 4 to 1 / 2 inch, and slowly release the bulb. Saline nasal sprays may be used in older children. Relieve pain. For children 6 months or younger, give only acetaminophen. For children older than 6 months, give either acetaminophen or ibuprofen. Ask your child's doctor for the correct dose for your child's age and weight. Adults can take acetaminophen, ibuprofen or aspirin. Use caution when giving aspirin to children or teenagers. Though aspirin is approved for use in children older than age 3, children and teenagers recovering from chickenpox or flu - like symptoms should never take aspirin. This is because aspirin has been linked to Reye's syndrome, rare but potentially life - threatening condition, in such children. Sip warm liquids. The cold remedy used in many cultures, taking in warm liquids, such as chicken soup, tea or warm apple juice, might be soothing and might ease congestion by increasing mucus flow. Try honey. Honey may help coughs in adults and children who are older than age 1. Try it in hot tea. Add moisture to the air. Cool - mist vaporizer or humidifier can add moisture to your home, which might help loosen congestion. Change water daily, and clean unit according to the manufacturer's instructions. Try over - counter cold and cough medications. For adults and children age 5 and older, OTC decongestants, antihistamines and pain relievers might offer some symptom relief. However, they won't prevent cold or shorten its duration, and most have some side effects. Experts agree that these shouldn't be given to younger children. Overuse and misuse of these medications can cause serious damage. Talk with your child's doctor before giving any medications. Take medications only directly Some cold remedies contain multiple ingredients, such as decongestant plus pain reliever, so read labels of cold medications you take to make sure you re not taking too much of any medication.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Continued

Symptom Comparison for Cold, Flu, and COVID-19

SymptomColdFluCOVID-19
Incubation Period1-3 days1-4 days1-14 days
Symptom OnsetGradualSuddenGradual or Sudden
FeverRareCommonCommon
CoughMild to ModerateCommonCommon
FatigueSometimesCommonCommon
Runny NoseCommonSometimesSometimes
Nasal CongestionCommonSometimesSometimes
DiarrheaRareSometimesSometimes
Body AchesSlightCommonSometimes
Sore ThroatCommonSometimesSometimes
HeadacheRareCommonSometimes
Loss of AppetiteSometimesCommonSometimes
Shortness of BreathMildSometimesCommon
Respiratory IssuesSometimesSometimesCommon

Information about symptoms of COVID - 19 coronavirus is prevalent in tradition and social media, so it's important to look at differences between COVID - 19, flu, and common cold. Flu season is still in full force, affecting millions of Americans. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is reporting that flu activity is high and is expected to continue for several more weeks. The common cold, flu, and coronavirus are all infectious viruses that affect the respiratory tract. All three are spread person - to - person and through direct contact with droplets either in air or from hard surfaces. Rarely do common colds have serious complications; however, flu and coronavirus can.


What is a chest cold?

Chest cold can be either viral or bacterial infection, though it is far more common to contract condition virally. Viruses that cause conditions are of the same variety as those that cause common cold or flu, and they usually develop from these conditions. If a cold or flu seems to worsen, therefore, it may be that a chest cold has develop. Viruses that cause chest colds are most commonly passed on through tiny droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes or talks. Virus can survive on surfaces such as countertops or door - handle,s for example, for up to 24 hours. To help avoid infection, individuals should take measures such as washing their hands thoroughly and avoiding sharing drinking glasses and utensils.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Is it pneumonia?

Pneumonia is an infection that inflames your lungs air sacs. Air sacs may fill up with fluid or pus, causing symptoms such as cough, fever, chills and trouble breathing. Bacterial pneumonia, which is the most common form, tends to be more serious than other types of pneumonia, with symptoms that require medical care. Symptoms of bacterial pneumonia can develop gradually or suddenly. Fever may rise as high as dangerous 105 degrees F, with profuse sweating and rapidly increased breathing and pulse rate. Lips and nailbeds may have bluish color due to lack of oxygen in the blood. A patient's mental state may be confusing or delirious. Symptoms of viral pneumonia usually develop over a period of several days. Early symptoms are similar to influenza. Symptoms: fever, dry cough, headache, muscle pain, and weakness. Within a day or two, symptoms typically get worse, with increasing cough, shortness of breath and muscle pain. There may be high fever and there may be blueness of lips. Symptoms may vary in certain populations. Newborns and infants may not show any signs of infection. Or, they may vomit, have fever and cough, or appear restless, sick, or tired and without energy. Older adults and people who have serious illnesses or weak immune systems may have fewer and milder symptoms. They may even have lower than normal temperature. Older adults who have pneumonia sometimes have sudden changes in mental awareness. For individuals that already have chronic lung disease, those symptoms may worsen.


Bacterial vs. Viral Pneumonia Symptoms

Pneumonia can be caused by a wide variety of bacteria, viruses or fungi. Pneumonia is most commonly classified by type of germ that causes it and by location where a person becomes infected. Community - acquired pneumonia is the most common type of pneumonia. This type of pneumonia occurs outside of hospitals or other healthcare facilities Causes include: bacteria: Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common bacterial cause of pneumonia. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Other atypical bacteria: Other types of bacteria with unique features can cause different types of pneumonia. These include Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae and Legionella pneumoniae. Viruses: Any virus that causes respiratory tract infection can cause pneumonia. Viruses that cause colds and flu can cause pneumonia. Fungi: pneumonia caused by fungi is least common as pneumonia. Fungus in soil in certain parts of the United States can become airborne and cause pneumonia. One example is valley fever. Hospital - acquire pneumonia develops during stay in hospital for another illness. This type of pneumonia can be more serious because person is already sick and antibiotics typically used may be less effective. Bacteria adapt and change over time when exposed to antibiotics, making them less effective. People in hospitals spread their drug - resistant bacteria to others, leading to more severe and difficult - to - treat cases of pneumonia. People who are on breathing machines are at increased risk for hospital - acquire pneumonia. Long - term care facility - acquire pneumonia occurs in long - term care facilities or outpatient, extend - stay clinics. Like hospitalized patients, drug - resistant bacteria are found in this setting. Aspiration pneumonia is another type of pneumonia. Aspiration is when solid food, liquids, saliva or vomit go down the trachea and into the lungs instead of going down the esophagus and into the stomach. If you cough up these substances, these particles remain in lung tissue and can become infected and pneumonia may develop.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Diagnosis

Cold symptoms usually last for about a week. During the first three days that you have cold symptoms, you are contagious. This means you can pass the cold to others, so stay home and get some much - needed rest. If cold symptoms do not seem to be improving after a week, you may have a bacterial infection, which means you may need antibiotics. Sometimes you may mistake cold symptoms for allergic rhinitis or sinus infection. If cold symptoms begin quickly and improve after a week, then it is usually a cold, not an allergy. If your cold symptoms do not seem to be getting better after a week, check with your doctor to see if you have developed allergy or sinusitis.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Are Colds Contagious?

Rhinoviruses can stay alive as droplets in the air or on surfaces for as long as 3 hours or even more. So if you touch your mouth or nose after touching someone or something that's been contaminated by one of these viruses, you 'll probably catch a cold. If you already have a cold, you are more likely to spread it to others if you don't wash your hands after you cough or sneeze. Going to school or doing normal activities probably won't make you feel any worse. But it will make it more likely that your cold will spread to classmates or friends.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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