Advanced searches left 3/3
Search only database of 12 mil and more summaries

Christiane of Saxe-Merseburg

Summarized by PlexPage
Last Updated: 02 July 2021

* If you want to update the article please login/register

General | Latest Info

Christiane of Saxe-Merseburg

Born( 1659-06-01 ) 1 June 1659 Merseburg
Died13 March 1679 (1679-03-13) (aged 19) Eisenberg
Noble familyHouse of Wettin
Spouse(s)Christian, Duke of Saxe-Eisenberg
FatherChristian I, Duke of Saxe-Merseburg
MotherChristiana of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glucksburg

Princess Christiana of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glucksburg, often referred to as Christiane, was consort of Christian I, Duke of Saxe-Merseburg, who was the ruling Duke of Saxe-Merseburg from 1650 until his death.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Life

In Merseburg on 13 February 1677, Christiane married Duke Christian of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg. Both belong to the House of Wettin: she was a member of the Albertine line while her husband belongs to the Ernestine branch. A couple settle in Eisenberg at Christianburg Castle. Two years later, on 4 March 1679, she gave birth to a daughter, named Christiane after her and later wife of Philip Ernst, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein-Glucksburg; however, nine days later she died of childbirth complications aged 19, probably from puerperal fever. She was buried in Merseburg Cathedral. In her honour, her husband built Castle church Trinity in Christianburg Castle.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Marriage and issue

It is impossible to make generalizations about German States during the period after the Thirty Years War because the country we now know as single unified Germany was then comprised of almost three hundred principalities, ranging in size and strength from large organized States of Prussia and Austria to small free cities of Frankfurt and Aachen. This almost two-hundred-year period is called Kleinstaaterei. As defined by noted British historian Joachim Whaley, term Kleinstaaterei, coin in the early 19th century, denotes extreme territorial fragmentation of the German state partially as result of the Thirty Years War and Treaty of Westphalia. While all of these statelets were culturally German, some belong to the Holy Roman Empire, some were free cities granted independence by imperial decree, and others belong to dynastic ducal families with lineages stretching back through the medieval period. One thing, however, that almost all of them share was the fluidity of their borders as result of political marriages. Until mid-15 century, most of these small German States did not possess any large-scale silver deposits and therefore were unable to mint many large high-grade silver coins. However, new sources of silver ores discovered mainly in Central Europe and Southern Germany in Erzgebirge, Saxony, and Tyrol, between 1460 and 1540, reversed this economic disadvantage. First minted in 1517 in Jachymov, small town in the Karlovy Vary region of Czech Republic populated by ethnic Germans, Joachimsthaler slowly gained acceptance and became a widespread trade coin and can be seen below. Soon the term thal, meaning valley, came to denote this numismatic type because many of the small cities and towns striking these early examples were situated in valleys near rich newly discovered silver deposits. Joachimthalers minted by Counts of Schlick became paragons of heavy silver coins, dwarfing most contemporary small silver coinage used by peasants in everyday transactions. These Thalers and others like them were used to facilitate trade with Italy and other Southern States during the renaissance as well as important resources for local defense. For example, Duke and Prince Julius of Brunswick-Luneburg and Brunswick-Wolfenbuttel issued a series of Multiple Thalers in an effort to establish a permanent reserve fund for defense of his Duchy. These coins range from 1 to 16 Thalers in value-enormous amount of silver when a standard 1 Thaler coin weighs about one ounce. He forces his subjects to purchase these massive coins, many of whom pay more than face value, and then require owners to exchange them for low-grade silver coins, to create an instant source of good silver coinage. But even though these large Multiple Thalers were relatively unusual, they demonstrate the importance of high-quality silver coinage in early modern age. While most standard weight Thalers include no major innovative design elements, Christian Duke of Saxe-Eisenbergs Death Thaler of 1679 is different.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

logo

Plex.page is an Online Knowledge, where all the summaries are written by a machine. We aim to collect all the knowledge the World Wide Web has to offer.

Partners:
Nvidia inception logo

© All rights reserved
2022 made by Algoritmi Vision Inc.

If you believe that any of the summaries on our website lead to misinformation, don't hesitate to contact us. We will immediately review it and remove the summaries if necessary.

If your domain is listed as one of the sources on any summary, you can consider participating in the "Online Knowledge" program, if you want to proceed, please follow these instructions to apply.
However, if you still want us to remove all links leading to your domain from Plex.page and never use your website as a source, please follow these instructions.