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Comic timing

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Last Updated: 19 December 2020

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This week, Science of Us is exploring time: What makes it feel like its speeding up or slowing down, how we learn to tell difference, and how we can learn to control it either way. Conventional wisdom dictates that timing is the secret to comedy. Kazakhstani reporter Borat Sagdiyev learned as much during his travels through America for his classic 2006 documentary, Borat! He visit HUMOR coach, who try to impart the basic principle of comedic Timing using not joking about the color of Borat suit. This suit is black that pause not! The Coach demonstrate, stressing the importance of having space between setup and punch line. This is obviously barely a joke, if it even deserves that name. It nevertheless perfectly illustrates one of the MOST widely accepted notions about timing in comedy: pausing before the punch line. But this conventional wisdom about comic timing might be all wrong, and not just because joke about suits isnt funny. Social Science and psychological research on comic timing is limited, but what exists suggests that laypersons understanding of how the rhythm of joke delivery works is totally mistaken. It may be that our sense of importance of comic timing comes more from how we perceive jokes than from how theyre deliver. And, for comedians, timing after the punch line is what really count. As psychologist Dean Buonomano points out in his new book about time and the human brain, our mind not only tracks the passage of time, but it can stretch or compress our sense of that passage in various ways. Consider, for instance, how people who have been in car accidents report that time seems to stand still. Is there a similar phenomenon at work in comedy? According to psychologists who study HUMOR, time may seem to stop for second because our brain is catching up with clever punch line. One of few studies on comic Timing was published in 2011 by Salvatore Attardo, linguist at Texas & M University. Attardo, former editor of HUMOR: International Journal of HUMOR Research, says that he found the same claim was made everywhere, from comedy manuals to scholarly research papers: Timing is essential to comedy, and comedians emphasize punch lines with pause. Attardo set out to quantify that comedic pause with an experiment in which he asked college students to tell two jokes, one of their choosing and and one give them a not-especially-Funny story about an engineer and a talking frog. When we start out, we think that this folk theory of Timing was correct, Attardo say. What we discover is that its complete nonsense. Data show that timing changes are simply not factor in the delivery of jokes, either in speeding up or slowing down or pausing before the punch line. Attardo said that when he shared his findings with professional comedians, they were not in the least bit surprised.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

History

The use of comic timing can be first observed in comic plays of ancient Greeks. Specifically, Aristophanes indicate brief pauses in his works, such as Clouds, in order to elicit laughter from unfolding events. William Shakespeare, along with comic playwrights before him, also utilized comic timing in much of his plays. For example, Cleopatra's strategic interjections during Mark Antony's speech in Act 1, Scene 2 of Antony and Cleopatra, shift an otherwise serious scene to a comic one. George Bernard Shaw notably continued the usage of comic timing into the late 19th century. In his 1894 play Arms and Man, for instance, Shaw triggers laughter near the end of Act 2 through Nicola's calculate eruptions of composure. While the use of comic timing continued to flourish on stage, by mid-20 century, comic timing become integral to comedy film, television, and stand-up comedy. In movies, comedians such as Charlie Chaplin, Laurel and Hardy, and Buster Keaton perfect their comedic performances through precise timing in films like One AM, Lucky Dog, and Playhouse respectively. On Television, Lucille Ball notably utilized comic timing in her show I Love Lucy. For example, in the episode, Lucy does TV Commercial Ball Act out advertisement within a fake Television set, but ruins the illusion by comically time breaking of TV's fourth wall. In stand-up, George Carlin's routine seven Words You can't Say on Television gets laughs from timing difference between delivery of the first 6 Words and seventh. Additionally, Rowan Atkinson's routine no One call Jones utilize slow comic timing in his list of student's names to reveal multiple double entendres. While the above history highlights specific writers and performers, all workers in comedy, from Victor Borge to Sacha Baron Cohen and beyond, have used comic timing to deliver their humour most effectively.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Adams was born in New York City to William Yarmy, Hungarian Jew, who worked as a soda clerk, and Consuelo Dieter, Roman Catholic struggling housewife, who was of both Dutch and Irish heritage; he was not raised in any religion but became a practicing Catholic. After Don dropped out of New York City's DeWitt Clinton High School at age 18 in 1941, one of his first jobs was theatre usher, and later worked as a comic and mimic, taking the stage name of Adams after marrying singer Adelaide efantis, who performed under the name Adelaide Adams. After their divorce, he still goes by the stage name Adams, explaining that he kept it because he Get tired of being last during alphabetical auditions. Adams served with the United States Marine Corps during World War II in Pacific Theatre. He was wound during the Battle of Guadalcanal, nearly dying. Also, he has blackwater fever. Upon his recovery and return to the States, he served as drill instructor. As Marine Corps drill instructor, he was commended by his superiors for being able to exceed the performance of his recruits at every required physical task.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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