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Covid Phlegm

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Last Updated: 02 July 2021

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General | Latest Info

Early and accurate detection is critical for preventing the spread of COVID - 19 and providing appropriate care for patients. Nasopharyngeal swabs, which require inserting a long shaft into the nasal cavity to collect samples from the back of the nose and throat, are currently the gold standard for collecting specimens for diagnosis. But the procedure is technically challenging, often uncomfortable for patients and requires personal protective equipment that may be in short supply. Other approaches to collecting specimens - including from oropharyngeal swab and sputum - have been tested in small studies, but there is uncertainty about which method is best for detecting viruses

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Emergency Symptoms

Moderate symptoms can progress into severe symptoms suddenly, especially in people who are older or who have chronic medical conditions like heart disease, diabetes, cancer or chronic respiratory problems. There have even been reports of people with mild to moderate symptoms feeling better and then suddenly getting worse and requiring hospitalization. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say if you begin to show severe symptoms of COVID - 19 - or what they call emergency warning signs - you should go to the emergency room or call 911 immediately. Constant Trouble breathing Persistent chest pain or pressure Confusion Trouble staying awake Blue lips or face

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

How to Check for Fever

Table

Consider calling an expert (e.g. your primary doctor) for guidance if you:Considering seeking urgent medical attention (call 911 if appropriate) if you:
Feel dehydrated or produce little urine even though you are drinking plenty of fluidsExperience shortness of breath (difficulty breathing) at rest or with simple activity
Experience symptoms associated with Covid-19 like cough and fever AND you are over age 60 or have a chronic medical condition like diabetes, heart disease, or lung diseaseHave chest pain
Have symptoms and were in direct contact with someone known to be infected with Covid-19 (you might be a candidate for Covid-19 testing)Become confused or light-headed
Have any other worrisome symptom for which you typically would call 911

Fever is a bodys way of warning you that something is off and can be a sign that your body is trying to fight illness or infection. For COVID - 19, high fever can be a presenting symptom, however there are other viruses to consider if fever is only a symptom, say Renee Dougherty, DO, primary care physician with Hackensack Meridian Medical Group. Influenza is still prevalent and something to be considered in patients with fever. Additionally, some bacterial infections, such as strep throat, can cause fever as well, although additional symptoms are normally present. The CDC considers a person to have fever when he or she has a measured temperature of 100. 4f. Youve probably checked your temperature before and using a thermometer is a simple process, but DO you know how to DO it effectively?

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

ALLERGIES, COLD, COVID-19: MOST COMMON SYMPTOMS FOR EACH

SYMPTOMSALLERGIESCOLDCOVID-19
Body AchesRarely
ChillsNoNo
FeverNoRarely
HeadacheSometimesSometimesSometimes
Nasal CongestionRarely
Runny NoseRarely
SneezingRarely
Itchy/Watery EyesNoNo
Dry CoughSometimes
Shortness of BreathSometimesSometimes
WheezingSometimesSometimes
Loss of SmellMildRarely
Sore ThroatSometimesSometimes
Nausea, Vomiting, DiarrheaNoSometimesSometimes
* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Cough questions

ALLERGIES, COLD, COVID-19: MOST COMMON SYMPTOMS FOR EACH

SYMPTOMSALLERGIESCOLDCOVID-19
Body AchesRarely
ChillsNoNo
FeverNoRarely
HeadacheSometimesSometimesSometimes
Nasal CongestionRarely
Runny NoseRarely
SneezingRarely
Itchy/Watery EyesNoNo
Dry CoughSometimes
Shortness of BreathSometimesSometimes
WheezingSometimesSometimes
Loss of SmellMildRarely
Sore ThroatSometimesSometimes
Nausea, Vomiting, DiarrheaNoSometimesSometimes

Once SARS - CoV - 2 is introduced in long - term care skilled nursing facility, rapid transmission can occur. Following identification of case of coronavirus disease 2019 in health care worker, 76 of 82 residents of SNF were tested for SARS - CoV - 2; 23 had positive test results, approximately half of whom were asymptomatic or presymptomatic on the day of testing. Symptom - base screening of SNF residents might fail to identify all SARS - CoV - 2 infections. Asymptomatic and presymptomatic SNF residents might contribute to SARS - CoV - 2 transmission. Once the facility has confirmed COVID - 19 case, all residents should be careful for using CDC - recommend personal protective equipment, with considerations for extended use or reuse of PPE as needed


COVID-19

If you test positive for the coronavirus that causes COVID - 19, here is what likely happen: Viral droplets transmitted from coughing or sneezing by person infected with the virus enter through your nose, mouth or eyes. In rarer cases, people become infected after touching something with someone's droplets on it, and then touching their face. From there, virus travels to the back of your nasal passages and to mucous membranes in the back of your throat. That place where symptoms such as sore throat and dry cough often start. Then viruses spread down airway passages to lungs. When lung membranes become inflamed, it is harder for them to work properly. In addition to causing problems in the lungs, virus may cause nausea, diarrhea or indigestion if it infects cells in the gastrointestinal system. In most severe cases, COVID - 19 may lead to organ failure and death.


Coronavirus Diagnosis: What Should I Expect?

Some patients with COVID - 19 may develop pneumonia, lung infection, if the virus makes its way to lungs. If you have pneumonia, air sacs in your lungs fill up with fluid, which impairs the lungs ' ability to transfer oxygen and results in difficulty breathing. Viral pneumonia, such as from COVID - 19, cannot be treated with antibiotics. In severe cases, ventilator support may be needed to ensure sufficient oxygen circulation in the body. People over age 65 and those with preexisting conditions are at higher risk of developing pneumonia and may experience more severe symptoms. Studies show that in patients with COVID - 19, pneumonia may progress into acute respiratory distress syndrome, which can be fatal in some patients.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Marvels of Mucus and Phlegm

ALLERGIES, COLD, COVID-19: MOST COMMON SYMPTOMS FOR EACH

SYMPTOMSALLERGIESCOLDCOVID-19
Body AchesRarely
ChillsNoNo
FeverNoRarely
HeadacheSometimesSometimesSometimes
Nasal CongestionRarely
Runny NoseRarely
SneezingRarely
Itchy/Watery EyesNoNo
Dry CoughSometimes
Shortness of BreathSometimesSometimes
WheezingSometimesSometimes
Loss of SmellMildRarely
Sore ThroatSometimesSometimes
Nausea, Vomiting, DiarrheaNoSometimesSometimes

According to the CDC and WHO, there are no medicines or immunizations right now to treat the COVID - 19 virus. At this time, please don't believe in any products that claim to prevent or treat coronavirus at this time. Additionally, antibiotics only treat bacteria, so they are not effective in treating this virus. What you can do is treat symptoms so that you recover as quickly as possible. The body is designed to fight viruses, and for most people, it do successfully on its own. If you are generally healthy, your body is likely to feel better after a few days and be totally recovered in about a week from the novel coronavirus. However, you may still be contagious for another week or so, which is why there is a 14 - day quarantine recommended for anyone WHO has has coronavirus.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

The Flu

ALLERGIES, COLD, COVID-19: MOST COMMON SYMPTOMS FOR EACH

SYMPTOMSALLERGIESCOLDCOVID-19
Body AchesRarely
ChillsNoNo
FeverNoRarely
HeadacheSometimesSometimesSometimes
Nasal CongestionRarely
Runny NoseRarely
SneezingRarely
Itchy/Watery EyesNoNo
Dry CoughSometimes
Shortness of BreathSometimesSometimes
WheezingSometimesSometimes
Loss of SmellMildRarely
Sore ThroatSometimesSometimes
Nausea, Vomiting, DiarrheaNoSometimesSometimes

When flu season collides with the expected second wave of COVID - 19 this fall and winter, doctors will show particular interest in order of patients ' symptoms after a new study at the University of Southern California identified key differences in respiratory diseases. Researchers find fever is the most likely first symptom of COVID - 19. When you get the flu, cough is most likely the first symptom. Complete order of COVID - 19 symptoms, as they appear in most cases, according to study: fever. Cough. Muscle pain. Nausea or vomiting. Diarrhea. The study, published Aug. 13 in Frontiers of Public Science, uses data from 55 000 confirmed coronavirus cases in China collected from Feb. 16 - 24 by the World Health Organization, supplemented by about 1 100 additional cases from December and January. They also reviewed 2 470 reported cases of flu in North America, Europe and the Southern Hemisphere from 1994 to 1998. Covid - 19 symptoms track similarly to two related coronaviruses, MERS and SARS. The first two symptoms of three coronaviruses are fever and cough. Unlike SARS and MERS, however, COVID - 19 tends to produce nausea and vomiting before Diarrhea. The 2003 SARS epidemic in China infected more than 8 000 people, causing 774 deaths. No SARS cases have been reported since 2004. Mers emerged in Saudi Arabia in 2012 with symptoms similar to SARS. It has since spread to other countries, including the United States. Sars - CoV - 2, virus that caused coronavirus Disease 2019, was first detected in December in Wuhan, capital city of Hubei Province in central China. The most elusive group in the study of COVID - 19 remains those WHO test positive for disease despite not showing any common symptoms. We still do not know the genetic predisposition of WHO develop little or no symptoms but can still spread viruses, say Dr. Faiqa Cheema, Hartford HealthCare Infectious Disease specialist, and if age, gender and race have any role to play. Great questions for current scientific research. Not feeling well? Call your healthcare provider for guidance and try to avoid going directly to the emergency department or Urgent Care Center, as this could increase the chances of the disease spreading. Click here to schedule a virtual visit with Hartford HealthCare - GoHealth Urgent Care provider. Stay with Hartford HealthCare for everything you need to know about the coronavirus threat. Click here for information update daily. Listen and subscribe to Hartford HealthCares More Life series on Apple Podcasts by clicking here. Stay fit. Stay happy. Stay healthy. And keep on top of COVID - 19 with Hartford HealthCares daily text alerts. Subscribe by texting MoreLife to 31996.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Allergies

Table

SymptomCOVID-19Seasonal allergies
Fever above 100.4F/38.0COftenNever
Dry coughOftenOften
FatigueOftenSometimes
Shortness of breathOftenNever
Body achesSometimesNever
Sore throatSometimesSometimes
DiarrheaSometimesNever
Loss of smell or tasteSometimesNever
Runny noseRarelyOften
Nasal congestionRarelyOften
Itchy throatNeverOften
Itchy eyesNeverOften
SneezingNeverOften

The main warning signs of COVID - 19, disease caused by a new coronavirus, are fever, fatigue, and dry cough. Sometimes, it also causes cold - like symptoms like a runny nose. During allergy season, it may be hard to tell the difference between COVID - 19 and allergies. Allergy symptoms happen partly because of inflammation. Thatas caused by your body overreacting to things like pollen or mold. Runny nose Dry, tickly cough Itchy or watery eyes Congestion People sometimes call allergies hay fever, but they do give you fever. Fever or chills, Dry cough, trouble breathing, body or muscle aches, Sore throat, Fatigue, headache, Loss of taste or smell, congestion or runny nose, Gastrointestinal problems like nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea Pinkeye Skin rash If you have any of these, especially fever, call your doctor. If you get allergies every year, watch for symptoms that are different from what you have had before. Severe allergies can make you feel tightness in your chest and shortness of breath, especially if you have asthma, too. But these can also be serious symptoms of COVID - 19. If you are sure or if you have been diagnosed with asthma, call your doctor or 911 right away.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

Table2

SymptomCOVID-19Allergies
Dry cough
Mucus/postnasal drip
Chest discomfort/pain
Shortness of breath
Wheezing
Fever
Sneezing
Nasal and eye watering and itching
Chills
Muscle Pain
Headache
Sore Throat
New loss of taste or smell

ALLERGIES, COLD, COVID-19: MOST COMMON SYMPTOMS FOR EACH

SYMPTOMSALLERGIESCOLDCOVID-19
Body AchesRarely
ChillsNoNo
FeverNoRarely
HeadacheSometimesSometimesSometimes
Nasal CongestionRarely
Runny NoseRarely
SneezingRarely
Itchy/Watery EyesNoNo
Dry CoughSometimes
Shortness of BreathSometimesSometimes
WheezingSometimesSometimes
Loss of SmellMildRarely
Sore ThroatSometimesSometimes
Nausea, Vomiting, DiarrheaNoSometimesSometimes
* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Bronchiectasis

Bronchiectasis is an under - diagnosed disease that can cause devastating lung damage. It affects walls of large airways of lung, slowly destroying muscles and elastic tissues that line bronchial tubes. Normal airways are built to contract and funnel mucus out of your lungs. But when airways become distorted and scarred by repeated infections, they can no longer clear out normal secretions. Mucus accumulates, forming a breeding ground for bacteria and inflammation, which causes further damage. As disease progress, it creates irregularly shaped pockets in the airways. Those pockets can become homes to more infections. Bronchiectasis increases with age. Fewer than 1 out of 20 000 people aged 18 to 34 have the disease. But that rise to about one in 350 people by age 75. A 2005 study estimated that 110 000 people in the US are treated for bronchiectasis each year. Another study found that hospitalization for bronchiectasis has been increasing by more than five percent a year since 2001. Symptoms include cough that never goes away and increased production of sputum, which is also know as phlegm. Some patients have frequent pneumonia. As your lung function decrease, you may also have shortness of breath and find you really increasingly tire. Advanced Disease can lead to heart failure. Although your medical history can indicate probable bronchiectasis, doctors often definitively diagnosis bronchiectasis using high - resolution CT scan. These detailed images can show if there's been thickening of walls of your bronchial tubes and whether you have misshapen, damaged or collapsed airways. Pulmonary function studies can assess the type and severity of your disease and measure the benefits of treatment.


CASE PRESENTATION

A 67 - year - old man with high blood pressure developed influenza - like symptoms after direct contact with a person with COVID - 19 infection. After 10 days with a fever, headache, dry cough, and two syncopal episodes, he gave to the emergency Department. Covid - 19 infection was confirmed with rRT - PCR test. Chest X - rays detect bilateral patchy opacities. Blood test results include white blood cells 4540 / mm 3, lymphocytes 77%, and C - reactive protein 23 mg / L. Arterial blood gas analysis reveal pH 7. 5, pO 2 54 mm Hg, pCO 2 32 mm Hg, and SaO 2 95%. The Electrocardiogram does not show any rhythm alteration with QT C 419 ms. He was admitted to the Infectious Diseases Department. Vital signs were blood pressure 120 / 75 mm Hg, heart rate 82 bpm, SpO 2 of 94% without O 2 - therapy. Body temperature was 36. 7c. Arterial blood gas analysis was repeat: pH 7. 48, pO 2 65 mm Hg, pCO 2 34 mm Hg. Blood tests showed lymphocytes 630 / mm 3, C - reactive protein 24 mg / L and D - dimer 684 g / L. On day 3 after admission, SpO 2 worsened and it was necessary to add morphine and modify O 2 - therapy from nasal cannula 4 L / min to respiratory mask 10 L / min. Spo 2 went from 87% to 94% with PaO 2 / FiO 2 112 mm Hg. D - dimer was 3937 g / L. Ctpa was perform: no filling defects were detected in pulmonary arteries, but multiple bilateral peripheral and with mainly subpleural distribution patchy GGOs were document, together with initial parenchymal distortion and some areas of consolidation at posterior - basal segment of both lower lobes. Segmental and subsegmental bronchi caliber were at the upper limits of standard Fig. 4. The following day, saturation worsened with PaO 2 / FiO 2 87 mm Hg, and the patient was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit for 2 days because he needed noninvasive positive pressure ventilation. Week after admission, lower - limb compression ultrasonography detected deep venous thrombosis in venous tract distal to left popliteal vein. Furthermore, D - dimer was 1661 g / L and CTPA was repeat. Ctpa detects filling defect in subsegmental pulmonary artery in the lower left lobe. Progression of viral pneumonia with increased interlobular septal thickening and larger areas of consolidation inside ground - glass opacities were visible in Fig. 5. Also in this case, segmental bronchi in both lungs, with significant predominance next to consolidative opacifications in lower lobes, show enlarged caliber and irregular walls, becoming bronchiectasic Fig. 5 C and D. Ratio between caliber of bronchus and corresponding artery increase in interval time between two exams of only 5 days Fig. 3. Similarly to the previous case, comparing two CT exams, no variation in caliber of segmental and subsegmental branches of pulmonary arteries was document. After 2 months from discharge, SaO 2 of patient in ambient air was 98% - 99%. He still had dyspnea, but only during mild exercise.


How COVID-19 Affects the Lungs

Ensure you have enough supplies in your house for a few weeks, in case you become unwell or need to self - isolate. This includes food, medications and household items. Keep away from others who are sick, both when inside and outside, and ask anyone who has symptoms not to visit. Avoid crowds or large gatherings. Avoid cruise travel and non - essential air travel. Practice regular hand hygiene by washing with warm water and soap for 20 seconds at a time. Do not touch your mouth, nose and eyes with unwashed hands. Keep up with your regular treatments. If COVID - 19 levels are high in your locality, stay at home as much as possible.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Introduction

Patients WHO are under investigation for COVID - 19 should be evaluated in a private room with the door closed and asked to wear a Surgical Mask. All other standard contact and airborne precautions should be observe, and treating healthcare personnel should wear Eye Protection. The most common serious manifestation of COVID - 19 upon initial presentation is pneumonia. Fever, cough, dyspnea, and abnormalities on chest imaging are common in these cases. Huang et al found that, among patients with pneumonia, 99% had fever, 70% reported fatigue, 59% had dry cough, 40% had anorexia, 35% experienced myalgias, 31% had dyspnea, and 27% had Sputum production.


Complications

Report complications of COVID - 19 have include pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, cardiac injury, arrhythmia, septic shock, liver dysfunction, acute kidney injury, and multi - organ failure, among others. Ards is a major complication in severe cases of COVID - 19, affecting 20% - 41% of hospitalized patients. Wu et al report that, among 200 patients with COVID - 19 who were hospitalize, older age, neutrophilia, and elevated lactate dehydrogenase and D - dimer levels increased risks of ARDS and death. Increasing data have show significant burden of cardiac injury in COVID - 19. Up to 20% of patients in cohort in China demonstrate cardiac injury, often associated with more severe disease. They were more likely to be older, to have ARDS, and to experience higher mortality rates. Clerkin et al and Driggin et al publish excellent reviews delineating current understanding and future investigation needs. Multiple case series have noted increased burden of cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular comorbidities in patients with COVID - 19, often associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The risk of cardiac injury, evidenced by increased troponin levels, was up to 22% in ICU patients. Interestingly, up to 12% of patients without known cardiovascular disease had elevated troponin levels or experienced cardiac arrest during hospitalization for COVID - 19. The Pathophysiology of injury is under investigation, but some presentations seem to relate to cytokine storm. Arentz et al, in a study of 21 patients with severe COVID - 19 admitted to ICU in Washington State, reported that 33% had cardiomyopathy. A study of 100 randomly selected patients in Germany show 78% had abnormal MRI findings median of 71 days after testing positive for SARS - CoV - 2. Of these, 60% show cardiac inflammation that was independent of preexisting conditions, severity and overall course of acute illness. Approximately 20% report atypical chest pain or palpitations at the time of MRI. Over one - third complain of ongoing shortness of breath. Data continues to emerge regarding cardiovascular complications and ongoing research is warrant. In a study of 5 449 patients hospitalized with severe COVID - 19 in New York, 1 993 developed acute kidney injury, 14. 3% of whom required dialysis. The need for dialysis was associated with severe disease and respiratory failure. Preliminary data analysis of patients with COVID - 19 who require high intensity care in Milan, Italy shows individuals commonly had low or suppressed serum thyroid stimulating hormone, with and without elevated free thyroxine concentrations. Subacute thyroiditis has been described as another viral infection. Neurologic symptoms have been described in patients during and following infection with SARS - CoV - 2 infection. Additionally, myasthenia gravis has been described following infections, manifested by development of antibodies to acetylcholine receptors. Restivo et al describe 3 cases of myasthenia gravis with symptoms appearing 5 - 7 days after onset of fever due to ARS - CoV - 2 infection.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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