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Cray Supercomputer

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Last Updated: 02 July 2021

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San JOSE, Calif. - November 18 2019 - Hewlett Packard Enterprise today announced it will deliver the industry's most comprehensive High - Performance Computing and Artificial Intelligence portfolio for Exascale ERA, which is characterized by explosive data growth and new converge workloads such as HPC, AI, and analytics. Addition of CRAY, Inc., Which HPE recently acquire, bolsters HPEs HPC and AI solutions to now encompass end - to - end Supercomputing architecture across compute, interconnect, Software, storage and services, delivered on premises, hybrid or as - aService. Now every enterprise can leverage the same foundational HPC technologies that POWER the world's fastest systems, and integrate them into their data centers to unlock insights and fuel new discoveries. Digital transformation is driving new data - intensive workloads and real - time analytics operating at an unprecedented scale. New Software, compute, interconnect, and storage capabilities are required for customers to unlock the potential of their data and accelerate innovation. Hpe delivers solutions for any experience from single, small systems all the way to Exascale - class Supercomputers with tailored Software, interconnect and storage capabilities. This includes solutions for modeling and simulation in weather forecasting, manufacturing and energy sectors, and AI and big data analytics in precision medicine, autonomous vehicles, geospatial imaging and financial services. The combination of HPE and CRAY will redefine the Supercomputing industry by delivering solutions and services that enable customers to thrive in Exascale ERA, helping them achieve significant breakthroughs and advances in business and society, said Peter Ungaro, senior vice president and general manager, HPC and AI, at HPE. Customers increasingly turn to HPE as a trusted, global partner that can help them harness the full POWER of data to address their most pressing challenges. Through combination of HPE and CRAY offerings, we now give customers more choice and control in how they apply HPC, to span any size and scale, running in any environment, from on premises to cloud. Hpes latest HPC and AI end - to - end portfolio is comprised of the following services, Software, computer interconnect and storage capabilities: Making HPC and AI accessible as Service as previously advertised, CRAY and Microsoft have collaborated to allow access to HPC Technology and Systems for CRAY in Microsoft Azure offerings. Hpe plans to expand customer choice for customers by providing its HPC and AI solutions through HPE GreenLake, market - leading as - aService offering from HPE. Hpc and AI Systems run like cloud - CRAY System Management Software, built on a container - base, multi - tenant architecture, enabling converge HPC and AI workloads to run simultaneously on a single system, providing administrators and developers with modern, cloud experience. Simplifying and optimizing workloads - HPE is simplifying application Development and Management across complex HPC and AI workloads that consist of diverse processors and accelerators with CRAY Programming Environment. Cpe provides a complete and fully supported developer Environment is a fully integrated software suite, offering compilers and programming languages, tools and libraries that maximize programmer productivity, application scalability and performance. It is designed to allow easy porting of existing applications with minimal recoding, while minimizing changes to existing programming models and simplifying developer transition to new hardware paradigm.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

The 1970s: Revolutionary Ideas

The first CRAY - 1 System was installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1976 and cost $8. 8 million. It boasts a world - record speed of 160 million floating - point operations per second and an 8 MB main memory. The architecture of CRAY - 1 System reflects its designer's penchant for bridging technical hurdles with revolutionary ideas. In order to increase the speed of this system, it was built with a unique C shape so integrated circuits could be placed closer together. No wire in the system was more than four feet long. To handle the intense heat computers generate, CRAY develops an innovative refrigeration system using Freon. Cray made its first international shipment in 1977, to the European Centre for Medium - Range Weather Forecasts, and within two years had opened subsidiary offices in the UK, Germany and Japan.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

The Cray-1 Supercomputer

The Breathtakingly fast computer being developed by Cray Inc. And Intel Corp. May help address some of the world's most inscrutable science and engineering problems, ranging from the origin of the universe to the development of cheap, high - energy, electric car batteries. Machine, known as Aurora, will be unlike any computer ever build. Operating at quintillion calculations per second, it will be five to ten times faster than today's speediest supercomputers. It will cost more than $500 million, use more than 200 000 processor cores, burn multiple megawatts of power, and be calculated six billion times faster than the Cray - 1 - machine that put supercomputing on the map 40 years ago. Its basketball court of computing cabinets, every one interconnect with other in a high - performance network, doing billion - billion operations per second, Peter Ungaro, CEO of Cray, Inc., Tell Design News. Significantly, Auroras formidable technology will be available, not only for huge scientific modeling projects, such as climate change studies, but for engineering applications, as well. Argonne National Laboratory, which will take delivery of the machine in 2021, has plans for it outside the world of pure science. Researchers there foresee it being used for computational fluid dynamics analysis of cars and aircraft, in development of NEW materials for EV batteries, for simulation of autonomous vehicles, for creation of future CMOS chips for the electronics industry, and in countless other applications. Argonne, which calls itself open user Facility, expects to allocate portions of machine number - crunching capability to many commercial engineering concerns with big computing needs. Moreover, technology that emerges from Aurora will trickle down to corporate users at their own sites. Refrigerator - size computing cabinets - Aurora will employ 200 of them - will be made available individually for purchase. That is a huge part of the excitement of building machines like these with commodity technology, Ungaro say. These are very good general - purpose machines for the average engineer to take advantage of. Argonne Labs refers to Auroras prodigious calculating capabilities as Exascale Computing - meaning that it will do 10 18 calculations per Second. To put that in perspective, person adding 1 + 11 into hand calculator once per second, without time off to eat or sleep, would need 31. 7 trillion years to do what Aurora will do in One Second. That computing speed will make it five to ten times faster than today's fastest Supercomputer, Summit machine at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. Such capabilities are considered necessary to address extremely large computing problems, many of which call for huge numbers of data points. The type of chemistry and physics going on in these problems is at such a fine scale, and has such high computational demand, that we wouldnt be able to do it without the Exascale machine, Note Katherine Riley, director of science for Argonne Labs Leadership Computing Facility. This is going to help the US ask more substantial questions than we would have been able to ask, even on Summit. The ability to ask those questions is largely dependent on machines processors, which will come from Intel Corp.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Cray Research, Inc.

Cray, name of the Minnesotan who pioneered the Supercomputer, will live on in high - tech. After news last week that CRAY Inc. Would be purchased by Hewlett Packard Enterprise, executives disclosed combined firms would continue to build and sell supercomputers under the CRAY name. In a letter to employees made available to investors this week, CRAY Chief Executive Peter Ungaro said Hewlett Packard Enterprise executives decided to combine their business into ours and are planning to keep the CRAY brand alive in how we market our supercomputing products. Cray is name for founder Seymour CRAY, who studied Engineering AT University of Minnesota and in 1957 helped start Control Data Corp., Which became one of the nation's largest computer firms in the 1960s and 1970s. He left Control Data in 1972 to start CRAY Research and build even larger machines known as supercomputers. He moved the company to Colorado in the early 1980s and sold it in 1996 to Silicon Graphics. Cray died in a car crash later that year AT age 71. Firm has been through several ownership changes since then. In recent years, it has been based in Seattle but continues to have sizable operations in Twin Cities, Colorado and Chippewa Falls, Wis., Where Seymour CRAY was born. Today, its main office in Twin Cities is in tower AT Mall of America that has its name prominently display. With $1. 3 billion sale to Hewlett Packard Enterprise, CRAY joins the heritage of a firm started by two other high - tech luminaries, William Hewlett and David Packard. They started their eponymous firm in a garage in Palo Alto, Calif., In 1939, founding that, for years, has been portrayed as Silicon Valley's original startup. Hewlett - Packard Co. Start as a maker of oscillators used to test sound equipment, expanded to other electronic - measuring equipment and built its first computer in 1966. By the 1980s, company was one of the world's biggest makers of calculators, personal computers and printers. In 2015, Hewlett - Packard split into two firms: HP Inc. As seller of personal - Computing products and Hewlett Packard Enterprise, or HPE, as provider of Enterprise - Technology infrastructure, software and services. With CRAY, HPE added to its business of developing and selling large computers. Cray's supercomputers are chiefly used by government and research institutions. Its revenue has seesawed in recent years but was about $460 million in 2018. Ungaro told employees he agonized in recent months as deal came together. I would be lying to you if I said that this was not an emotionally difficult decision. Heck, I haven't slept so well these past few weeks, he write. But he said CRAY has continued to be a challenge for capital to pay for new technology and expansion. With our current operating model, it's challenging to make investments we need to fully take advantage of opportunities, Ungaro write. At the same time, our size often inhibits the US from getting the same prices on components that our competitors do.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

HPEs Plans for Cray

In its May 17 announcement, HPE executives say it will integrate Crays Technology into its existing HPC portfolio, which includes HPE Apollo and SGI hardware. It also plans to build future HPC - as - aService, and artificial intelligence and machine learning cloud services, on HPE GreenLake. With the acquisition, HPE will get Crays current generation XC and CS supercomputers and next - generation Shasta supercomputer that feature new High - speed interconnect, code - name Slingshot. Crays products also include High - Performance Storage, full HPC system software stack, and data analytics and AI solutions that are fully integrate. Most HPC hardware vendors today sell commoditized cluster stacks comprising of Infiniband or Ethernet - Base networking, says Gartners Dekate. But IBM and HPE are only HPC vendors that can differentiate themselves: IBM with its Power9 processors, and now HPE with Crays Slingshot and ClusterStor HPC Storage hardware. Cray gives HPE a unique, technological edge, he say. Slingshot provides HPE with an extremely high - bandwidth network for HPC and AI workloads. It enables new network topologies that are required for extreme - scale HPC and AI. Analysts also say CRAY acquisition complements HPEs existing investments and research into AI and Exascale products. For example, Shasta and Slingshot align well with HPEs Research and Development efforts for the Energy Department PathForward Program, which aims to maximize energy efficiency and performance for future Exascale supercomputers. As a result, HPE now boasts a portfolio that can address HPC requirements of diverse scales, from value - optimized entry - level systems to extreme - scale HPC platforms, Dekate say.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Why Cray Made the Deal

$10 million supercomputer sits unwanted on the floor of the Wisconsin factory of Cray Research Corp., Its shiny skin removed and its high - technology innards used only to test replacement parts to upgrade other machines. Supercomputer, designate No. 1205 by Cray, was built three years ago for the Indian Institute of Science in Bangalore. But the deal fell through in December, after India got tired of waiting for the Bush administration to resolve the two - year dispute over how to make sure the super - fast computing power of the Cray machine would not be diverted to make nuclear weapons and missiles to deliver them. Now Cray cannot find another buyer for the machine, which uses 11 - year - old technology, because most institutions want more powerful, state - of - art supercomputers - the fastest, most powerful class of computers in the world. And India has built its own supercomputers, which are taking over its home market and competing with Cray around the world. India can use its homemade supercomputers without restrictions in its nuclear program and, if it want, sell them to nations such as Iran, Iraq and Libya, which have been suspected of trying to build atomic weapons. The debate over sales to India illustrates stresses within the US government over selling advanced technology products - the country's edge in an increasingly competitive world - while trying to keep a lid on the spread of nuclear weapons. Debate was never resolved by the Bush administration, and now the nation's proliferation concerns are likely to run head - on into President Clinton's oft - state objective of increasing overseas sales of superior US goods in order to boost the economy and create high - skilled, high - wage jobs. In many cases, though, nation's technological edge lies in advanced products such as supercomputers or aviation electronics that can be used equally for peaceful or military purposes. This is a horror story that hurt US commercial interests and its nonproliferation concerns as well, Willard Workman, International vice President of the US Chamber of Commerce and former government specialist on export controls, said of Cray's Indian deal. Despite the end of the Cold War, restrictions on technology exports have not eased as US fears that the country's high technology would bolster Soviet military machines have been replaced by concerns over the spread of nuclear weapons to nations such as Iran, Iraq and Libya. Proliferation foes hail the breakdown of Indian sales as victory. The fact that India had to develop its own supercomputer vindicates our policy of making it difficult for that country to buy Cray, said Gary Milhollin, director of the Wisconsin Project on Nuclear Arms Control, Washington - base think tank. Just because somebody can make pistol on his own doesn't mean you sell him an AK - 47 assault rifle. India has steadfastly denied that it is trying to develop an atomic bomb, but it unleashed what it terms a peaceful nuclear explosion in 1974 that US intelligence analysts say was a major step in an ongoing, clandestine program to build nuclear weapons.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Will HPE-Cray Pairing Be Successful?

San Jose, Calif., September 25 2019 Hewlett Packard Enterprise today announced IT has completed the acquisition of supercomputing leader Cray Inc., Earlier than the original target date. Hpe pay $35. 00 per share, in transaction value of approximately $1. 4 billion, net of cash. The explosion of data is driving significant expansion of high performance computing as customers seek to unlock the power of their data through artificial intelligence, machine learning, and big data analytics, requiring technologies that can power exascale - class performance. Over the next three years, HPC segment of market and associate storage and services is expected to grow from approximately $28 billion in 2018 to approximately $35 billion in 2021 1. Hpc is a key component of HPE's vision and growth strategy as IT provides a backbone to process, analyze and extract insights from massive amounts of data. The combination of HPE and Cray is expected to deliver significant customer benefits and future offerings including: bringing together Cray and HPE establishes the most comprehensive end - to - end portfolio across computer storage, software and services in fast - growing high performance Computing and artificial intelligence market segments, say Phil Davis, president, Hybrid IT, Hewlett Packard Enterprise. But, real value is what we can accomplish together as one team. We are united in our vision to be the global leader in high performance Computing. By combining teams of deep expertise and R & D engines, we are in a better position to help our customers solve their most data - intensive challenges both today and well into the future. As part of the acquisition, Cray president and CEO Peter Ungaro, will join HPE as head of HPC and AI business unit in Hybrid IT. For almost 50 years, Cray has been dedicated to being a leader in supercomputing in support of our customers ' most important missions, says Peter Ungaro, president and CEO at Cray. Cray and HPE have shared vision for a new exascale era, and by joining forces, were offering the promise of Crays Technology to expand the market with opportunity to leverage HPE breadth, scale and innovation to bring supercomputing to enterprise. I am excited about this next chapter, and on behalf of our company and Board of Directors, d like to thank our valued customers, partners, shareholders and, of course, our employees, for all of their contributions in making Cray a leader in high - performance Computing. Both HPE and Cray continue to win new customers. For instance, in the last two quarters, Department of Energy has selected Crays Shasta supercomputing systems and Slingshot interconnect as the first three exascale systems in the United States. Cray has generated more than $1. 5b in bookings to date for its New Shasta supercomputing system. HPE also recently announced a four - year, multi - phase collaboration between HPE and NASA Ames Research Center to build a new Supercomputer, which NASA has named Aitken, based on HPE SGI 8600 system. Aitken will support modeling and simulations of entry, descent and landing for future lunar landings.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Seymour Crays Legendary Supercomputer Legacy

Some of the world's most challenging algorithms can be worked out in mere moments by supercomputers, type of computing technology which goes well beyond processing power found in typical desktop PC. The typical desktop PC has only one processor even when that processor is a multi - core option capable of running more than one task, and simply cannot touch the computing power of a supercomputer. Supercomputers today are constructed with tens of thousands of central processing units instal in parallel and in communication with thousands of gigabytes worth of random access memory, carrying an incredible amount of processing power capable of creating real - time weather models, decrypting data transfer over secure channels or performing genetic analysis. It seems almost like they have been around forever, and for many of US they have been around forever, if by forever you mean for our entire life. But computers in general, and supercomputers specifically, have only been around for a couple of generations. If you are a computer aficionado, you undoubtedly know the name Seymour Cray. Cray became practically synonymous with Supercomputing for decades,. In fact, Cray is widely known as the father of Supercomputing. Today we take a moment to remember Cray's important Patent anniversary. It was on December 5 1978 that the United States Patent and Trademark Office issued US Patent No. 4 128 88 0, entitled Computer Register Vector Processing, which lists Cray as the sole inventor. It was the 880 Patent for which Cray was posthumously inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 1997. Supercomputers are designed to be so fast that their processing speed is measured on different order of magnitude than PCs. Processing speed, also know as clock speed, typically tops out at order of gigahertz, measure of oscillation indicating billion pulses per second. The CPU can perform about one instruction per pulse. Instead of hertz, however, processing speed in supercomputers is measured in terms of floating - point operations per second, or flops. As of June 2015, Worlds fastest supercomputer was Tianhe - 2, Chinese supercomputer developed at National University of Defense Technology. Tianhe - 2 has 3. 12 million processing cores and operate at a processing speed of 33. 86 petaflops, allowing it to conduct quadrillions of calculations every second. Three of supercomputers in that top 10 list of most powerful commercially available computers maintained by TOP500, including the second - most powerful supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, TN, bear the name of the man known as the father of supercomputer: Seymour Cray. This December 5th marks the anniversary of issuance of an important Patent in the field of Vector Processing, major step forward in Supercomputing Technology. Developers of supercomputers have been in pursuit of an infinitely fast clock which is capable of executing a single instruction stream program on single memory which is both infinitely large and incredibly fast.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Supercomputer roll-out

Supercomputer maker Cray announced what it called its last supercomputer architecture before entering the Era of Exascale Computing. It is code - name Shasta, and the Department of Energy, already regular customers of Supercomputing, say it will be first to deploy it, in 2020. Shasta architecture is unique in that it will be the first server to support multiple processor types. Users will be able to deploy a mix of x86, GPU, ARM and FPGA processors in a single system. Up to now, servers either come with x86 or, in a few select cases, ARM processors, with GPUs and FPGAs as add - in cards that plug into PCI Express slots. This will be the first case of fully native onboard processors, and I hardly expect Cray to be alone in using this design. Also beefing up the system is the use of three distinct interconnects. Shasta will feature new Cray - design interconnect technology called Slingshot, which the company claims is both faster and more flexible than other protocols for interconnecting, along with Intel Omni - Path Technology and Mellanoxs Infiniband. There has been effort to improve interconnect technology, since communication between processors and memory is often source of slowdown. Processors, while not growing at the rate of Moores Law anymore, are still leave waiting to hear from other processors and memory, so expanding interconnects has been a growing effort. Slingshot is a high - speed, purpose - built Supercomputing interconnect that Cray claims will offer up to five times more bandwidth per node than existing interconnects and is designed for data - centric computing. Slingshot will feature Ethernet compatibility, advanced adaptive routing, first - of - akind congestion control, and sophisticated quality - of - service capabilities. Support for both IP - rout and remote memory operations will broaden the range of applications beyond traditional modeling and simulation. The reduction in network diameter from five hops in the current Cray XC generation of supercomputers to three will reduce latency and power while improving sustained bandwidth and reliability. Cray is looking beyond just the HPC market with Shasta, though. Its targeting modeling, simulation, AI and analytics workloads are all data - centric enterprise workloads and the design of Shasta allows it to run diverse workloads and workflows all on one system, all at same time. Shasta hardware and software designs are meant to tackle bottlenecks and other manageability issues that emerge as systems scale up. Slingshots architecture is designed for applications that deal with massive amounts of data and need to run across large numbers of processors, like AI, big data and analytics to provide synchronization across all processors. One sign that Cray is targeting enterprise is Shasta has the option of industry - standard 19 - inch cabinets instead of Crays custom supercomputer cabinets, and it supports Ethernet, data Center standard for interconnectivity, along with standard supercomputer interconnects. Supercomputer companies pushing down into enterprise will certainly force HPE, Dell, Cisco and white - box vendors to up their game quite a bit.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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