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Depression Affect Memory

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Last Updated: 02 July 2021

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General | Latest Info

Sometimes, it is difficult to get out of bed. Under the fog of depression, daily tasks are just tedious, they can seem purposeless. Moving through routines is a struggle. Happy things appear mute, and bad news sounds even worse. Depression affects how people feel. But it can also change how they think. When I see patients, they complain of memory problems, says Carrie Holmberg, postdoc in Psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford University who studies mood disorder. Patients may have trouble finding their keys or retaining information theyve read in a book. People often point to just not being able to function as well. These anecdotal reports reflect a growing body of research showing that depression can affect memory and cognition in diverse and surprising ways. Depressed people have trouble remembering fine details of events theyve experience. General experiences, like vacation, come to mind easily but not specifics, like enjoyable meals from vacation. People prospective memory, or remembering to carry out planned activity in the future, also suffer from depression. It is harder to remember to return library book or take daily medication. While details and prospective memories take a hit, there is no trouble recalling bad memories. Healthy, non - depressed people usually have better memory of positive events than neutral or negative events, says Daniel Dillon, assistant professor of Psychiatry at Harvard University. Meanwhile, depressed people have stronger recall of bad memories. In depressed folks, people think negative memory improves, but really, positive bias has decrease, Dillon say. Its obvious to people, and more obvious in clinical interview, you have this dominant negative recall. In 2014, researchers examined negative cognition in people who were formerly depressed and groups who never had depression. People who previously had depression were better at remembering negative adjectives from selection of words than group who had never been depress. Scientists conducting research in 2007 examined the role of positive memory in mood regulation, finding that depressed people's moods worsen when encouraged to recall happy memories. When people who were formerly depressed recall happy memories, their sad moods do not change. Brain may reveal some clues about depression hold over memory. The area of the brain dealing with learning and memory hippocampus is sensitive to stress, and tends to be smaller in people with depression. Diminish hippocampal volume could explain poor recollection, Dillon say. In addition, ruminative thoughts characteristic of disorder could make it hard for people to concentrate on other tasks. Rumination, or fixating on upsetting situations or events, occupies neural resources that the brain could spend on other things, like memory. Those findings may not PROVIDE the full picture. The Small hippocampus does explain the emotional component of memory problems. There is no reason it would disrupt positive memories, explains Dillon. What's more, some people prone to depression may have smaller hippocampi before developing disease. We still have poor functional understanding of what is going on with memory and depression, says Dillon.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Other causes of memory loss

Other reasons you may experience memory loss can include the following: normal age - related memory loss is common and manageable. One example of this is forgetting where you put your glasses but remembering later in the day. Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia. It can cause progressive, irreparable brain damage and memory loss. Mild cognitive impairment can alter thinking skills and eventually progress to Alzheimer's disease or other forms of dementia. Minor head injury or trauma can trigger slight memory problems, even if you do lose consciousness. Forgetfulness is a potential side effect of certain medications. Brain tumors or brain infections can affect your memory or trigger dementia - like symptoms. Vitamin B - 12 deficiency can create problems with your memory. This is because youre not maintaining healthy nerve cells and red blood cells. Alcoholism or drug abuse can impair your mental state and abilities. This can also occur when alcohol interacts with medications. Hypothyroidism slows your metabolism, which can lead to memory problems and other issues with thinking. Brain or nerve damage caused by diseases such as Parkinsons disease or multiple sclerosis can cause memory problems. A 2013 study found that people with depression have a greater risk of developing Parkinsons disease. Electroconvulsive therapy can cause memory loss. Ect alters brain chemistry, which can reverse symptoms of depression and other mental illnesses. If you have ECT, your doctor will perform it while youre under general anesthesia. During ECT, your doctor sends small electric currents through your brain, triggering a brief seizure. People can experience confusion and short - term memory loss after receiving ECT treatments.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

July 24, 2020

Medication Feeling better takes time. If you are prescribed an antidepressant, talk with your doctor about how long it will take to feel full benefit. In some cases, it may take six to eight weeks. Never stop taking antidepressants without consulting your doctor first. Abruptly stopping antidepressants can cause unwanted side effects. Counseling Your doctor may refer you to a Mental Health professional, such as counselor, psychologist, psychiatrist or social worker. Counseling can be very effective in the treatment of depression, and can help you deal with problems you are facing. It's important to be comfortable with the professional you seek treatment from, so consider interviewing several to find a good fit. Your primary care physician, insurance provider or community Mental Health clinic may be able to provide referrals.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

How Does Anxiety Impact Memory?A

If you experience generalized anxiety disorder, you have chronic and persistent anxiety. Your friends and loved ones may describe you as nervous or worrier. You may feel anxious about daily situations and your worry is likely out of proportion or irrational. Anxiety can alter your everyday routines, and it can also have an impact on your memories. Memories can be affected when you are under periods of stress or experience some sort of disturbance in your mood. Having a significant anxiety disorder like GAD can create some of these problems routinely, leaving you operating below your normal level of memory functioning.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Heres the science

Memory problems relating to depression are thought to happen because your brain's processing speed - its ability to take in information quickly and efficiently - becomes impaired when youre depress, which affects how you process and retrieve memories. In fact, researchers from Brigham Young University believe they have worked out exactly why depression affects memory. They believe it damages a process called pattern separation, which is your ability to differentiate things that are similar. The more depressed a person feels, more difficult it becomes to distinguish between similar experiences, meaning theyre less likely to remember them. Plus, lots of people who are depressed are also distracted and have difficulty concentrating, which CAN prevent them really focusing on things enough to remember them. Depression has a tendency to trap you in negative thought - loops, which is why it has been dubbed the interference phenomenon by some experts. You become fixated on these thoughts to an extent that they interfere with your ability to remember other facts or information.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Introduction

Millions of people worldwide suffer from depressive mood. By conservative estimates, depression costs the US government about $83 billion each year. Research has consistently shown that depression, cognitive impairment and dementia are all common in older adults. As standards of living improve around the world, people are living longer. In the US, population of 65 and over increased 15% between 2000 and 2010 and is expected to increase an additional 36% by 2020, reaching 55 million. These projections have created a surge in research on aging and related issues, such as depression, cognitive impairment and dementia. While slight decline in cognitive functioning is considered part of normal aging, cognitive impairment and depression are not. Additionally, studies have suggested that depression is associated with an increased risk of dementia. A new study conducted by researchers at the Center for BrainHealth at University of Texas in Dallas has found a link between cognitive impairment and depression, suggesting that depression CAN trigger short - term memory loss. It is the first such research demonstrating memory loss in people suffering from depression that was conducted in a laboratory setting. Researchers find that the presence of depressive thoughts makes it difficult for participants to remember, which subsequently leads to memory loss. Subjects were 157 undergraduate students, 60 of whom were categorized as depressed mood, while the rest were categorized as in non - depressed mood. All were asked to answer True or False questions that assess whether their thoughts were depressive or neutral thoughts. After completing questions, participants were asked to memorize a series of numbers. Results indicate that participants in depressive mood forgot more numbers than those who were not depress. Furthermore, people forget more numbers after answering questions associated with depressed thoughts than after answering questions with neutral thought. Researchers call depression interference phenomenon that CAN result in short - term memory loss by as much as 12 percent. They also suggest that their research may help to explain why people who suffer from depression find it difficult to concentrate, have poor work performance, and often experience decline in personal and social relationships. Studying has potential to assist scientists in developing new therapeutic approaches in treatment of depression, such as teaching people to recognize and inhibit depressive thoughts. This type of psychoeducation typically involves teaching people about how to recognize signs of relapse so they CAN get necessary treatment before depression worsens or occurs again. Hubbarda, NA, Hutchisonab, JL, Turnera, M, Montroyc, J, Bowlesc RP, and Rypmaab, V. Depressive thoughts limit working memory capacity in dysphoria. Journal of Cognition & Emotion: DOI: 10. 1080 / 02699931.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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