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Eduard Limonov

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Eduard Limonov

BornEduard Veniaminovich Savenko ( 1943-02-22 ) 22 February 1943 Dzerzhinsk , Gorky Oblast , Russian SFSR , Soviet Union
Died17 March 2020 (2020-03-17) (aged 77) Moscow , Russia
OccupationWriter, poet, essayist, publicist, leader of The Other Russia , former leader of the National Bolshevik Party , editor of newspaper Limonka
NationalityRussian
CitizenshipSoviet (1943-74) Statelessness (1974-87) French (1987-2011) Russian (1992-2020)
Alma materKharkiv National Pedagogical University
Period1958-2020
GenreNovel, poetry, short story, autobiography, political essay
Literary movementPostmodernism ( Russian postmodernism )
Notable worksIt's Me, Eddie His Butler's Story A Young Scoundrel Memoir of a Russian Punk The Book of Water The triumph of metaphysics The Other Russia
PartnerAnna Rubinshtein Yelena Shchapova Natalya Medvedeva (1983-1995) Yekaterina Volkova
ChildrenBogdan Alexandra
Website
limonov-eduard .livejournal .com

Eduard Limonov, Russian writer and political activist whose chameleonlike career included living in exile in New York and leading the Russia ultra-right National Bolshevik Party, died on Tuesday in MOSCOW. He was 77. Other Russia, political opposition group of which he was leader, posted news of his death on its website e but gave no details. Mr. Limonov likes to describe himself as Johnny Rotten of Soviet dissident writers, reference to the impish, anarchic lead singer of the Sex Pistols. His first book, Its Me, Eddie, published in France in 1979, was a fictionalize, somewhat scandalous memoir about Russian in New York. The Soviet press found it filthy, Keith Gessen wrote in Slate in 2003, while the more perceptive emigre establishment denounced Limonov for stating the awful truth: that for many of those who came over, America was just nasty, brutal and expensive and New York was no City on a hill. The book, when finally published in Russia in 1991, is said to have sold a million copies. In meantime, Mr. Limonov had write, among other things, His Butlers Story, another fictionalize memoir, inspired by his time as housekeeper to a wealthy Manhattanite in the late 1970s. The protagonist, Maggie Paley wrote in a review in New York Times, had a decidedly sour outlook. He hats the underclass for being weak and stupid and the ruling class for being insensitive, she write. He hat women whom he describes in terms of female sex organs for using men. He considers other Russians in New York to be snobs or boors. He has no use for political systems, Communist or capitalist. He believes in the Revolution as a phenomenon of nature. Yet hes make no plans to foment it. The review was critical of aspects of the book, but Ms. Paley found some merit in the work. Though Edward Limonovs judgment may be faulty, review conclude, he is to be congratulated for his audacity, his insistence on saying what most people are afraid to say, his sheer, beautiful nerve. After living in France for a time, Mr. Limonov returned to Russia after the collapse of the Soviet Union and created the National Bolshevik Party. He becomes a visible if sometimes hard-to-pin-down figure, something like semifictional characters in his books. Limonov founded NBP in 1993 after returning to Russia from years abroad, Times wrote about him in 2008. Since then, his message has changed from anti-Americanism and anti-capitalism to anti-Putinism and anti-fascism though rabid nationalism has dominate. The Article describes the group as part Merry Pranksters, part revolutionary vanguard. Mr. Limonov calls its protests velvet terrorism. Members, for instance, would throw tomatoes or eggs at political figures they dislike. Authorities, though, weren't laughing: Mr. Limonov spent two and half years in jail in the mid-2000s on weapons charges.

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Biography

On March 17, writer and political activist Eduard Limonov died in Moscow of cancer at age 77. It was reported on the site of Political Party, Other Russia, that Limonov is head. Limonov was born Eduard Veniaminovich Savenko in 1943 in Dzerzhinsk. He began to write poetry in 1958 and took part in his first political protest in 1963 in strike against wage cuts. At age 17, he was already working in a variety of manual jobs, including loader, ironworker, welder, and construction worker. In 1967, he moved to Moscow, where he quickly gained celebrity more as a tailor than poet: He sewn jeans and jackets for the entire Moscow underground. During his period in Moscow, he wrote and self-publish poetry and was a well-know part of Young literary Moscow. Somewhere along the way, Savenko becomes Limonov, nom de plume purportedly invented by cartoonist Bagrich Bakhchanyan. In 1974, by his account, KGB told him he either had to become an informer or emigrate; He and his then wife, Yelena Shchapova, whom he married in an Orthodox Church ceremony almost unheard-Of at time, left for New York. In New York, Limonov and Shchapova quickly divorce. Limonov works as a proof-reader for the local Russian-language newspaper Novoye Russkoye Slovo while continuing to write prose and poetry. His largely fictional autobiography Its Me, Eddie, was Sensation in the Russian diaspora and then in the Soviet Union, once copy was smuggled in. Limonovs New York was not emigre paradise. Write in revolutionary style, Its Me, Eddie was brash, critical, obscene, pornographic and yet moving and utterly compelling. He would write other books about his time in New York, including Butlers Story, in part about his job working as a private servant at home on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. He was the author of more than 15 works of fiction and hundreds of articles. At the same time he was writing fiction, he worked with the American Socialist Workers Party and once handcuffed himself to the building Of New York Times to protest their refusal to publish his articles. He was eventually fired from Novoye Russkoye Slovo, and in 1980 Limonov moved to France, where he became close to the leaders of the French Communist Party, who were instrumental in helping him get French citizenship in 1987. However, as soon as the Soviet Union collapse, Limonov arranged for Russian citizenship and moved back to Moscow. Although he continued to write, both articles for Russian Press and some in intentionally terrible English for eXile and fiction, he was more involved in politics, professing odd, for Russia, mix of left and right. While he attended every protest against State impingement of the right to assembly and joined forces with Gary Kasparov to March in Anti-governmental demonstrations in Moscow 2006-2008, he founded the right-wing, nationalist National Bolshevik Party and then, after it was disbanded under Court order, Other Russia Party.

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Literary work

Limonov's works are known for their cynicism. His novels are also memoirs, describing his experiences as a youth in Russia and as an emigre in the United States. In 2007, Swiss novelist Christian Kracht wrote to American businessman David Woodard, Solzhenitsyn has described Limonov as 'a little insect Who writes pornography, ' while Limonov described Solzhenitsyn as a traitor to his homeland Who contributed to the downfall of the USSR. Ad Marginem publishes My friend Eduard Limonovs novels. Your obedient servantChristian Eduard Kracht Limonov's works were scandalous to the Russian public, once they began to be published in the USSR during the late Perestroika era. Particularly note is It's Me, Eddie, which contains numerous pornographic descriptions of homosexual acts involving the narrator. The author later argued that such scenes were fictive; however, his fellow Russian nationalists were nevertheless appal by such descriptions in Limonov's work. Thus, Neo-Nazi leader Alexander Barkashov remarked to journalist of Komsomolskaya Pravda concerning Limonov:,. Russian film director and screenwriter Aleksandr Veledinskii's 2004 feature film Russkoe is based on Limonov's writings. Since the late 1990s, Limonov has been a regular contributor to living here and later to eXile, both English-language newspapers in Moscow. These are only known sources where Limonov has written articles in English. When he joined as contributor, he specifically asked the editors of paper that they preserve his terrible Russian English style. Although most of his featured articles are political, he also writes on many topics, including advice for ambitious youngsters.

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Selected bibliography

The book opens with a quote by Vladimir PUTIN: Whoever wants the Soviet Union back has no brain. Whoever doesnt miss it has no heart. And then, murder: journalist Anna Politkovskaya, critic of the Russian president, is found dead. A Memorial service was held in Moscow. It is here that we encounter the protagonist of this enchanting book: aging Russian dissident Eduard Limonov. Carrere, French writer and journalist, had known Limonov in the 80s, in Paris, where Limonova hard-drinking, skirt-chasing novelist and Soviet emigrewas popular among the French intellectual elite. But then things go horribly wrong. In the 90s, BBC documentary captures him attacking the City of Sarajevo, under command of Serbian War criminal Radovan Karadzic. He returns to Russia to found the National Bolshevik Party: fascist movement whose lackeys adopt shave heads and raise-arm salutes to their German Neo-Nazi forebears. How did all this come to be? Carrere begins at the beginning, with the Limonovs born in Second World War-era Ukraine. The Ensuing Life Story, told chronologically, is so wildly implausible, it would appear absurdif it were entirely true. We get to know Limonov as Anti-establishment Poet in Ukraine, shadowy rebel in Moscow, famous novelist in Paris, millionaires Butler in Manhattan, and Hero to Soviet nostalgics in Central Asia. We watch him party with Salvador Dali, Susan Sontag and Andy Warhol in New Yorkand spend months in a dreary Russian jail. Along the way are gaggles of love affairs: with soap opera actresses, heavy-bottomed bookkeepers and, once, gay man in an empty park. With considerable space devoted to the revolutions of 1989, book will surely find an eager audience with those watching events in the former Soviet Union with unease. But it is also rip-roaringly fun to read. In his writing, Carreredescribed is, by the Guardian as the most important French writer youve ever heard ofis, something of Parisian Truman Capote. He describes this book as a non-fiction novel, for, while its stories are rooted in fact, they are also heavily stylize. In the final pages, he travels to Russia to interview rather disinterested Limonov, who asks why the author has chosen to write his biography. Carrere answers that he finds Limonovs story fascinating. Limonov, in turn, only shrugsand declare that he has lived s-tty life.

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Filmography

ROME-Oscar-winning director Pawel Pawlikowski is set to direct Limonov, ambitious adaptation of French author Emmanuele Carrere's novelized biography of Radical Russian Poet and Political dissident Eduard Limonov. Polish-born Pawlikowski has completed the screenplay for the biopic, which recounts Outrageous Adventures of Radical Soviet Poet Who becomes Bum in New York, Sensation in France, and Political Antihero in Russia, as extended titles of books English translation The film is set for 2018 shoot. Limonov was a Soviet underground idol under Leonid Brezhnev; butler to a millionaire in Manhattan; writer in Paris; and more recently, charismic leader of the Russian National Bolshevik Party. Biopic will be in languages of places where it is set, which are Russia, New York, and Paris. Italys Wildside, which is owned by FremantleMedia, is co-producing Limonov with French producer Dimitri Rassams Chapter 2, company behind Little Prince. The budget is about €16 million. Warner Bros. Italia will be the film's Italian distributor. Talks are underway for a world sales company to come on board. Wildsides Mario Gianani, Lorenzo Mieli and Lorenzo Gangarossa are lead producers. Wildside won the bidding war in 2013 for rights to Limonov, which has been bestseller in Italy and France, where it won Prix Renaudot in 2011. Carreres Book has also been named Best Book of Year by the New York Times and Guardian newspapers. Pavel has a great job on screenplay, says Gianani, noting that the Carreres novel was a re-interpretation of Limonov's character and that the film will be even more so. British writer-director Ben Hopkins collaborated with Pawlikowski on the script. Casting for the Russian actor who will play the lead has just started in Moscow and. Petersburg. Pawlikowski first intersected with Limonov when the director shot the 1992 Bosnian War BBC documentary Serbian Epics and Film him in the company of Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, who was found guilty last year of crimes against humanity. Pawlikowski won an Oscar for Best Foreign-Language Film for Ida in 2015. His upcoming Poland-set period romance Cold War, now in post-production, was acquired in August by Amazon Studios.

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Budding Poet

So how did Limonov get to this? Born in Dzerzhinsk as son of a lowly NKVD officer in 1943, he grew up in a modest household, albeit one relatively privilege on account of his father's connections. Eduards future seemed to hold little more than factory work or lowly service in his father's image, but his family was a bit more equal than most, shield as it was from various hazards of the Stalinist postwar period. Limonovs memories of this era were overwhelmingly positive: in his teenage years, he became a budding poet running with bad boys from the hood, for whom he embodied something like their resident gangster rapper. During his predicament as a laborer in a local factory, Eduard developed a degree of contempt for his coworkers: people in the same position as him, yet people with their shoulders bowing in defeat, deferential to fate, and without any ambitions to escape the monotony of their lives. Eduards poetry was his ticket to bohemian existence in the Russian artistic underground, where poets, artists, and dissidents of all stripes rub shoulders first in Kharkiv, then in Moscow. Limonov never considered himself a dissident. As he would later insist, he was delinquent, not dissident: punk rather than critic. His motivation was never desire to reform the Soviet system, with which he saw nothing fundamentally wrong aside from certain inertia, but rather his own personal ambition. Eduard Limonov wanted to be somebody. He was a great poet during his time in Moscow, if eyewitnesses are to be believe. But in 1974, he decided he had outgrown it and emigrated to the United States-with blessing of Soviet officials, who by now considered his nonconformist style mild nuisance. These were very early days of punk in Limonovs new home of New York City, and he felt quite at home among fashionable junkie poets, New wave musicians, and wash-up Warhol hangers-on at CBGB. It was also the last year in the life of Karl Otto Paetel, original German Nazbol and author of the National Bolshevist Manifesto, who died in New York City in May 1975. I sometimes wondered whether the two might have meet, and if Paetel passed on some seed to Limonov, although chances are, admittedly, slight. Limonov, who went from destitute poet to homeless bum and then, by happenstance, became a billionaires servant during his time in New York, hat bourgeoisie. In His Butlers Story, one of several memoirs based on his Manhattan period, he describes himself as an anarchist in this period; he speaks of mastering theory of class struggle in NYC, of capitalist pigs and international bourgeoisie, which he considers his philanthro-capitalist employer particularly hypocritical specimen. But beyond such phrases, chosen by the protagonist to portray himself in hindsight, there is little indication that Limonovs politics at time extend beyond most elementary if justified class hatred.

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Deciding to Act

Book of Strange New Things, by Michel Faber. In this futuristic novel by the author of the epic Crimson Petal and White, Peter Leigh, priest, has been chosen by a mysterious corporation to serve as missionary to inscrutable native inhabitants of a distant planet. He leaves his brilliant, devoted wife, Bea, back on Earth, and a great deal of the novel is made up of their increasingly strain correspondence. Peter is thrilled to find locals amenable to his proselytizing, while Bea describes terrifying developments at home, including natural disasters and food shortages. Faber illustrates, movingly, impossibility of adequate communication in the face of life-changing experience. Novels pace can be overly deliberate, but its details are rich and memorable. Children Act, by Ian McEwan. A moral dilemma lies at the heart of this novel: young man refuses medical treatment because of his religious beliefs, and the secular establishment tries to save him from the cult-like influence of his parents. The judge presiding over the case is herself in crisis: her husband has told her he wants to start an affair with a younger woman, and she reflects that she has been drifting deeper into family law as idea of her own family recede. Books ' tight scheme leaves some characters underdevelop, but ideas about religion and society are absorbing. Moral systems, McEwan writes, are like peaks in dense mountain range seen from a great distance, none obviously higher, more important, truer than another. Limonov, by Emmanuel Carrere, translated from French by John Lambert. Like this maddening, electrifying bookequal parts biography, adventure yarn, and odethe Russian writer and sometime political agitator Eduard Limonov Is shape-shifter. Born in 1943, he has been a foundry worker and poet in the USSR; bum and butler in New York; literary star in Paris; fighter in the Balkans; Leader of the ultra-nationalist Party in Moscow. Carrere recognizes the risk of being seduced by his subjects ' outsize life and macho self-mythologizing. There were times when I hat Limonov, He confess, but he is drawn to Limonov's determination to be a hero, truly great man. Carreres prose has brash punk energy; his refusal to flatten Limonov with easy judgment gives the book its life. Village of Secrets, by Caroline Moorehead. In 1941, in German-occupied France, Jewish children were smuggled to Le Chambon-sur-Lignon, small town high on plateau in the center of the country. Le Chambon has long been mythologize in France for the actions of its inhabitants, who shelter refugees and help many escape to Switzerland. But, as this riveting history shows, story is more complex. Instead of one village, there were several, and the inhabitants were far from united in their decision to help: some, indeed, were anti-Semitic.

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Oppositionist (and Not)

So, was Limonov ever a real leftist or fascist? In Boris Groyss's view, it probably depends on the definition of leftist. But essentially, his political activity is a poetic performance in the style of Marinetti. It was always about being a charismatic leader. He may sound nationalist but in Russian context, he is neither nationalist nor conservative but Western import. Be that as it may, Limonovs Cultural National Bolshevism resonated with Russian youths in a post-Soviet context. Indeed, simultaneous experiences of national dismemberment and economic doom produce psychological effects not unlike that which haunted Germans after World War I. Nazbols boast their strongest bases of support where territorial and socioeconomic degradation of the former USSR was felt most acutely among young ethnic Russians in countries such as Latvia and Lithuania. From mid-2000s, Limonov attempted to widen his appeal, rebranding himself as the face of anti-Putin opposition. He helped to set up a broad pro-democracy front alongside worthies such as chess grandmaster Garry Kasparov. In this vein, he even earns himself praise of late Anna Politkovskaya, journalist-author of Putins Russia. Give his previous political trajectory, it is doubtful that Limonov had really grown soft to notions of democracy and pluralism. Stiff prison sentences endured by Nazbol militants at the turn of the century may well have inspired him to moderate his demands for a strong law and order state. More recently, events around Euromaidan and the resulting civil War saw Limonov voice critical support for Putin, eventually landing him, lifelong anti-establishment figure, regular slot on Russian TV. Its hard to imagine Pussy Riot taking a similar turn, though nor would Man like Limonov ever have earn affections of Madonna. Much about Limonov is relatable. He even displays inspiring commitment to underdog. Profound class hatred permeating his books will be familiar to many of us, yet there is also a certain sensitivity to his writing. In His Butlers Story, he describes with great honesty the humiliation he feel, his inability to cope with situation down to his trembling hands, as he endures another barrage of verbal abuse from his boss. Far from all of Limonovs work was outstanding, especially objectionable was his sometimes inclination to pass off masturbation fantasies regarding young girls as transgressive prose. But despite such repugnant material, he was far from being substance-free contrarian. He was a problematic character, to say the least, but one from whose colorful life and work had much to tell us about the times that created him. Eduard Limonov died on March 17 2020 in hospital in MOSCOW, following complications after surgery, reportedly linked to cancer. One hop that his passing will encourage someone to republish long out-of-print English translations of classics such as Its Me, Eddie or Memoir of Russian Punk. Indeed, just days before his death, seventy-seven-Year-Old Limonov announced that he had just signed a publishing deal for a book he had write.

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From tailor to emigre

By 1974, after he had left the USSR, Limonov had already lived quite a life. A Provincial poet from Kharkiv eduard Savenko took punk-sounding nom-de-guerre, Limonov, and moved to Moscow. At first, he had to work as a tailor to make ends meet, but then his poetry grew popular in bohemian circles, among artists and authors not fond of authorities. In 1973, he marries Elena Shchapova, model and fellow poet, and the couple leave the USSR a year later. It is unclear why precisely Limonov left Moscow. In 1992, author would claim that KGB tried to convince him to become their snitch, with departure as the only alternative. Nevertheless, in another interview Limonov say: It was mostly a feeling of estrangement from the place I live IN, will to find another path that makes me go.

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Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

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