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Electronic Music Organisations

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Last Updated: 02 July 2021

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PRS for Music has today announced that it has joined the Association for Electronic Music. AFEM represents the full ecosystem of businesses involved in Electronic Music including managers, label owners, publishers, agencies, promoters, retailers, distributors, media and technology specialists. AFEM membership will reinforce PRS for musical relationships across the Electronic Music sector and assist with connections to emerging technologies and pioneering practices, enabling it to continue to innovate and adapt its own practices on behalf of its members. Since 2017, PRS for Music, with support from AFEMs Get play Get pay initiative, has been installing Music recognition technology provided by DJ Monitor into select UK clubs and festivals to identify music played by DJs. MRT delivers highly accurate setlist information that is used to improve distribution of licence fees paid by music venues and festivals, significantly improving payments to Electronic Music creators and rightsholders. Claire Jarvis, director of membership, PRS for Music, say: Joining AFEM marks an important move towards further strengthening PRS for Music's relationship with the electronic and dance music community. Together, we will continue to advocate for genre and help to bring about positive change. Ashley Howard, dance relationship manager, PRS for Music, say: Our membership of AFEM demonstrates how PRS for Music sits in leading pack of PROs who have a clear commitment to dance and the electronic music industry. I look forward to developing initiatives and building relationships that will benefit the memberships of both organisations. Kurosh Nasseri, co-founder and co-chair, AFEM, say: We are delighted to have PRS for Music join AFEM to add to the growing number of performing rights societies and other collective management organisations which have become affiliate members of the Association. Our vision and desire is to serve as a platform for open dialogue between CMOs for the benefit of the Electronic Music ecosystem. Greg Marshall, general manager, AFEM, say: We welcome PRS for Music as an affiliate member of AFEM. This represents a clear commitment to progressing dialogue, policies and activities which best support Electronic Music. Over the past five years, AFEM Get Played Get pay campaign has advocated for Music recognition technology deployment at DJ events to help improve royalty accuracy for creators and owners of Music play-area which PRS for Music has demonstrated a proactive and collaborative approach. I look forward to deepening our relationship to better serve businesses and creators within the Electronic Music scene.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Native Instruments and Pioneer DJ

Today at 10 edition of International Music Summit Ibiza, Association for Electronic Music, global voice of the Electronic Music industry, announces their first phase of Artist Ambassadors. Aligning with organisations with strong voice and purpose, list includes some of electronic music's most respected global artists, diverse range of DJs, musicians and producers from both mainstream and underground that represent the spectrum of genre. The full list of confirmed Ambassadors to date are: Anja Schneider, Armin Van Buuren, Black Coffee, B-Traits, Carl Craig, Jean Michel Jarre, Louie Vega, Nicole Moudaber, Nile Rodgers, Paul Van Dyk, Pete Tong and Seth Troxler. Giving their time free of charge, Ambassadors will raise awareness of key issues within the Electronic Music industry, communicating on wide variety of challenges they face; with a clear objective to help encourage and effect positive change. With tough issues tackled including royalty transparency, diversity, piracy, and harm reduction, the announcement of Artist Ambassadors firmly cements AFEMs ' proactive commitment to change. AFEM have gained a firm reputation for challenging the status quo and initiating change with successful campaigns such as Get play Get pay; ensuring technology is used to ID music play in clubs and festivals so that right artists, labels and publishers get pay per play. In addition to this, Safe in Sound previously connected experts, promoters, governments and clubs to modify laws, best practice and education surrounding harm reduction and drug policy. AFEM also today announces that Pioneer DJ and Native Instruments are joining as full members. They join companies such as DJ Monitor, Yacast and BMAT, reflection of the continued shift in technology companies driving genre forward. Mark Lawrence, CEO of AFEM, states the challenges we face and opportunities we must take do not only impact on Electronic Music businesses, they impact on DJs, musicians, songwriters, DJs and fans. With the announcement of our Artist Ambassadors, AFEM becomes the global voice of the Electronic Music genre, from those who create our music right through to those who passionately enjoy and embrace it. When AFEM opened its doors to membership in 2014, the ambition was to represent every type of organisation in Electronic Music and every key territory, so that its voice was genuinely global and working towards becoming the voice of the Electronic Music ecosystem. AFEM was created by Ben Turner and Kurosh Nasseri, and the organisation now has 140 members in 40 countries, 20 working groups and 4 active campaigns, including diversity, anti piracy and mental and physical health support for fans and professionals. Current members of the organisation include the likes of CAA, Insomniac, Live Nation, Ministry of Sound, Paradigm, Universal, WME, plus Artist managers, media, labels and publishers from across the spectrum. The second phase of AFEM Artist Ambassadors will be revealed at the Amsterdam Dance Event this October.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

A Growing Digital Music Market

The music industry went to great lengths at the beginning of the century to put a stop to online piracy; however, they were not equally ambitious and innovative in developing new models for legal online distribution. Certainly, there were few feeble attempts from major record labels at the time, but the most important criterion in development of these services seems to be that they should not in any way threaten existing revenue streams but should only add additional revenue to companies. Majors do succeed with one of their goals, which is that new services should not compete with existing Physical sales. However, unfortunately, services could not compete with anything, especially not with online piracy. The first company that was able to create a successful online service for legal sales and distribution of Music was not a Music Industry player at allait was Apple Computer. In 2003, Apple was able to convince major labels that music consumers would buy music legally if they were offered an extremely simple service that allowed them to buy and download music for less than a dollar per track. The service was called iTunes Music Store. In one sense, on the other hand, iTunes can also be considered as very careful and incremental innovation, as major labelsa positions and power structures remain largely unscathed. Rights holders still control their properties and structures that guide royalties paid for every track that was sold were predictable and transparent. Apple were correct in their prediction of consumer behavior and the iTunes Music Store can not be considered as anything but an enormous success. In 2013, iTunes Music Store is the worldas largest music retailer and it has sold more than 25 billion songs since its launch in 2003. Service has evolved substantially during its decade-long existence, and a number of competitors using more or less the same business model have entered the digital Download Music market. Even though competition has increase, iTunes remains on top with a market share of more than 50 percent of the Global digital Music market. Figure 1 indicates how the global record music market has evolved since 1973, and shows that while the digital music market has been able to partially compensate for the decline in physical sales, total record music market still has lost more than 50 percent of its sales since its peak in 1999.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

The Real-Time Listening Experience

While revenues from recorded music have fallen dramatically during the past 15 years, people across the world do not listen less to musicarather they listen to more recorded music than ever before. For instance, in pre-Internet days, recording music was expensive and scarce. Music listeners choose what record to buy with care and the growing record collection in their living room cabinets serves as a diary of their lives told via the number of record purchases. Music listenersA own their physical records in the same way as they have a strong sense of ownership about other physical objects, such as books, souvenirs, or furniture, and these objects serve as tools for both identity formation and communication. Institutions, such asA collection andA ownership, become increasingly irrelevant in the age of digital distribution and ubiquitous access to Music. In light of this observation, relevant question is what the new role of recorded music as identity marker in the age of Digital distribution may be. Retrospective record collections serve as such an identity marker in the pre-Internet age, but as music listeners abandon their physical collections they are required to search for new ways to use recorded music as a tool for communication of their identities with their friends and the world. Scenes that are increasingly used for that purpose are online-base social networks such as Facebook, Twitter, etc. Access-base Music services are commonly interconnect with such social network services, and thereby allow music listeners to constantly announce to the world what track they are currently listening to. This stream of information is primarily of interest to advertising platforms and their clients since it allows them to profile audience based on their listening habits and send them advertising messages that are adapted to their demographics and interests. The shift from theA retrospective collection to theA real-time listening experience is a radical shift in music listenersA relationship to music. It diminishes the significance of memory of past music experiences and moves focus to here and now. It is interesting to note the kind of structures and behaviors that emerge as music consumption shifts fromA ownership toA access and fromA collection to theA now playing. Amaral et al. Have, for instance, show that music listeners actively curate their music-listening feed in order to make sure that it does not reveal tracks that do not fit with the image they want to exhibit. Some access-base music services have even Create private featurea in order to enable users to listen to music without sharing experience with the world. Access-base services are still in their early days and they still actively search for optimal service and pricing structure that will allow them to compete and survive. Currently, competition between services is largely based on the size of their music catalogs, availability in different territories and different mobile platforms, etc.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

The Music Industrial Transformation Continues

Over the last fifty years, use of computers to generate sound has evolved into what is today popular mainstream music. Format, mediums, performance, and distribution of music have forced those in the music industry to follow this rising trend and either adapt or die out. These new developments in how audio is manipulated are not the only ones the music industry has see. In fact, changes that come with digital technology reach far beyond audio recording. Audio production has evolve, independent artists not bound to major record labels are on a more level playing field, and even the way consumers listen to and purchase music has changed with times.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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