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Faroese art

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Last Updated: 07 November 2020

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General | Latest Info

Landscape and nature form the basis for understanding of Faroese art. In line with rising National consciousness in the mid-19 century, landscape painting take on important symbolic meaning as specific artistic expression in Faroese people's search for National identity. The same development can be seen in other Nordic countries-which right now is demonstrated by the exhibition 'Mirror of nature. Nordic landscape painting 1840-1910' at the Danish National Gallery in Copenhagen. Growing interest in landscape and nature has its roots in folk culture. Landscape painting has become a mirror through which people's sense of belonging and dependency on nature is illustrate, and has become an important factor in the creation of national identity. High mountains, sea, green hillsides, light, fjords, changing weather, wind and rain showers-all these characterise Faroese landscape painting. Human beings also find a place in art, but are often depicted in relation to dependency on and struggle with nature. What is so special and unique for Faroese art history is Faroese artists' insistence on and unerring focus on landscape painting throughout the whole of the 20th century. Landscape and nature are dominant motifs and themes in Faroese art. The Landscape become a motif through which problems in modern art are expressed and attempt to be addrest in constant exploration and experiment with various modes of expression: colour, light, flatness, space, composition, brush strokes, etc. Jogvan Waagstein was a pioneer in Faroese pictorial art and landscape painting. During the beginning of the 20th century, he paint, as no one before him, epic panoramas of Faroese landscape with its characteristic features. Inspiration come from paintings of the Danish Golden Age, but the colours and light remind me of the impressionist style. He was still an amateur, but with Waagstein, Faroese people saw their landscape portrayed for the first time in pictorial arts. The Faroe Islands' first real professional artist is called Samuel Joensen-Mikines. He was undoubtedly Faroes' most significant and famous artist and is known as the father of Faroese painting'. He pioneered expressionist landscape painting that has draw so many followers and, in many ways, has become the essence of modern Faroese art. In the 1930s he paint, via landscape and human figures, suffering, pain and death. He produces large, monumental compositions keep in dark, gloomy colours. In the 1940s, he painted his first famous whaling paintings, recurrent theme and motif. With these paintings come strong colours, movement, drama and dynamism in his art. Expressionistic style, his choice of colours and portrayal of human suffering and death have come to characterise Joensen-Mikines' work. Frimod Joensen stands somewhat alone in Faroese art. His universe is also Faroese landscape, villages and everyday life. But it is also so much more. He paints what he sees and dreams and longs for. And he transposes this as directly as possible to canvas, or often on masonite panel he has to hand.

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* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Pioneers

It all begins with nature. The Pioneers of Faroese visual art were Niels Kruse, Kristin I Geil and Jogvan Waagstein; all self-taught painters. They paint landscapes inspired by 19-century national-romantic movement and all-pervading nature. The first Faroese professional painter, Samal Joensen-Mikines, was the first who seriously ventured and chose painting as an occupation, and he has influenced Faroese painting considerably. He began his education at the Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen in 1928 with Aksel Jrgensen and Ejnar Nielsen as his teachers. The latter, together with the Norwegian painter Edvard Munch, serve as the greatest sources of inspiration for Mikine's symbolic, expressive, and often sombre and dramatic portrayals in which death plays a major role. The darkest paintings are dated around 1934, which became a fateful year for Mikines. His native village, that hold his name, Mikines, was struck by grief when large parts of male population of the village drowned following two boat wrecks. Furthermore, this was the year when Mikine's father die. Mikines described it as an artistic experience when his father's coffin was carried through the village. Later on, his landscape paintings had more light and were more idyllic. Drama, however, remains an important part of the artistic expression of Samal Joensen-Mikines. Following the forceful beginning of Mikines, Faroese Art experiences virtual blossoming after World War II when several talented and productive artists return to the Faroe Islands after finishing their studies in Denmark. Among these was sculptor Janus Kamban-fiery soul in Faroese Art circles by reason of his own art, as well as organizer of exhibitions of Faroese Art. Painter, Ruth Smith, belongs to the same generation. When looking at her lifes work, it is undoubtedly her portraits, and especially self-portraits from 1950s, that stand as strongest. These are colouristic masterpieces, characterized by deep insight into the complementary relationship of colours. However, it is not solely formal quality that makes an impression. Short, restless strokes of paintbrush seem to make the picture surface quiver with life. She wants simply to paint the truth, but prosaic descriptions are not without dramatic-expressive qualities. Confront with these paintings, one is reminded of Edvard Munchs artistic creed, that artist must dissect soul on canvas. Ruth Smith portrays her own person with examining, critical-almost merciless-eyes. She goes through great pains to portray eyes and it is not entirely by chance that eyes are called mirror of the soul, because looking into the eyes of her paintings, it feels like you are looking directly into the troubled soul of the artist. Also, poetic and in every way unique paintings of artist Steffan Danielsen, from the Island of Nolsoy, have a tremendous impact on the beholder; also today, as we sense their quiet and boundless loneliness.

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* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

No isms

View from outside, grip that Faroese art-motifically speaking-take on Faroese landscape might seem to be an innocent and rather old-fashion approach to visual art. In other countries, artists have for many years been interested in installations, minimalism and conceptual art, but so far this has not affected Faroese art much. We do not have many isms in Faroese art and, eg, Faroese expressionism is based on reality and not on art theory. This expressionism spring from-at times-hard living conditions in the Faroe Islands, together with overwhelming and dramatic nature. Cubism in Faroese art has been mentioned a few times, but Faroese cubism is quite different from the originally intended analytical cubism of Picasso and Braque; in Faroese, cubism, tangible reality, is never far away. All the same, cubism has had some impact on Faroese art. This is mainly because of the artist Jack Kampmann, who settled in the Faroe Islands after World War II. He was a painter and graphic artist as well as an accomplished art teacher, which benefited Faroese artists greatly. Many of his paintings show profound influence from French painter Paul Cezannes compositions. Ingalvur av Reyni, who has come to exert greatest influence on contemporary Faroese art, learn great deal from Jack Kampmann. Around 1960, he painted some wholly abstract pictures, but more often he used Faroese landscapes as basis. In his work, we see that he is not content with simply registering overwhelming landscape. He fights it, simplifies it, abstracts from it, until only essence is leave, until spiritual experience of motif has become an independent work of art. In paintings and prints of Anker Mortensen, there is a clear connection to Ingalvur av Reynis abstract paintings, and also watercolour paintings from later years. Younger artists are fundamentally abstract in their works, which often seem mysterious with literary titles that derive from poetry and also from hymns and quotations from the Bible. Zacharias Heinesen is in capital form and has devoted himself and his attention to the Faroese landscape through half a century of working with art. His famous compositions, with square and triangular houses and mountains in bright lucid colours, have inspired many Faroese artist. The motif that persistently seems to preoccupy his interest is a village by the ocean. The atmosphere in his work appears light and compositions seem relatively straightforward. Artistic enterprises appear to consist largely of registering light conditions in nature. In Torbjrn Olsens ' colouristic paintings, sensuousness appears almost tangible. He is not fond of being called a literary painter or illustrator. Nevertheless, it can be ascertained that he, in his altarpieces, got a lot of inspiration from Biblical stories and from people. A whole lot of things seem to happen when he has living people standing in front of him as models.

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* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Faroese visual art today

A lot has happened since the first Faroese painters, not so much longer than a century ago, painted first landscape paintings, to show the beauty of their country, and demonstrate their love for their homeland. Countless new themes and motives have entered into Faroese Art since then, international styles have had their influence, and today an impressive number of artists work with pictorial art, lively debates about art take place in all media and on every street corner, new galleries and art venues pop up every year, and Art plays important role in everyday life. Some things are still the same, though, and the landscape is still the dominant motive in Faroese Art, just as the interplay between nature and mankind is still the most prevalent theme. Faroese painters have through generations sought images that can portray states of mind, moods and feelings that nature awakens in them, and they have sought forms in nature that can be used to explore and express their inward struggles. From the depth of the sea to the height of the sky, nature is being artistically investigated in every possible way. With psychological interpretations or ironic comments, poetic expressions or conceptual statements, or simply as an opportunity to carry out formal experiments. Nature is all around. Faroese art is completely new and exactly the same, and maybe it is just this that makes it so fascinating and so alluring to foreigners. This ability to play both traditional and contemporary, local and international, unique and general. Because in this constant alternation between originality and renewal and in constant movement between vernacular and global endless nuances, contrasts, tensions and aesthetic possibilities are create, and together they form rich, wonderful, inspiring pictorial art.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

The Faroese food culture

Very few places on Earth have the power to trigger your senses, like the Faroe Islands. Its land is brutally rocky, shaped by the strength of oceanic breezes and rainstorms sweeping away any form of life standing. Only in such an isolated volcanic archipelago could culinary DNA encode by will to survive and thrive with such character and pride. The blooming scene of young chefs is starting to push further boundaries of local cuisine, where Faroese ingredients and methods take on Michelin-star propositions. Their plates are filled with stories to tell and awe-inspiring shapes and colours that prove Faroes have much more to offer than only beautiful landscapes. The first thing that strikes when driving from the airport to Torshavn, capital, is how few green and harvestable lands there are. You get the sense that youve landed on giant rock where only thousands of sheep ramble around. A few fun facts now to help grasp the uniqueness of this terroir: no trees grow on the Faroe Islands and the sheep population exceeds its inhabitants in number. Combine that to harsh weather keeping temperature evenly cold all year long and youve get the most improbable environment for nurturing any kind of refined culinary expression. Yet, Faroese are such strong defenders of their millennial traditions that a clear line can be traced between history and food culture. And quite a fascinating one, indeed.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Music From the Faroes

Deeply rooted in their long tradition of ballads and songs, people of Faroes simply cannot stop singing. Vocal traditions have been exceptionally rich and versatile, as there were no musical instruments of significance until the mid 1800s, voice was the only MUSIC-making tool available, and as result, singing is deeply anchor in Faroese national identity. Today, however, voice stand no longer alone, and instrumental variations and creations have no ending. BUZZING MUSIC. The Faroe Islands MUSIC scene is BUZZING and artists and creators across all genres are delivering world-class performances and recordings. Teitur and Eivr are undoubtedly among the best-known artists internationally. Their respective careers span over more than a decade and both enjoy international acclaim. The metal scene is ALIVE too and Viking Metal band Tyr has a successful career in Europe as charismatic dark doom Metal band Hamfer is knocking on new doors. Two new artists within alternative MUSIC are singer, songwriter, theatre composer and actor Budam and avant-garde Orka, who have wowed media and audiences across Europe. MUSIC ALIVE. The most curious place leave on earth is New York Times state after attending yearly G! Festival and Guardian claim it as probably the wildest event on the festival calendar. The live MUSIC scene is indeed curious and wild. Thriving live MUSIC scene is taking people by surprise, and without doubt G! The festival has brought the world's attention to Faroese MUSIC. Most FESTIVALS take place during summer time and in August the popular Summerfestival in Klaksvik, Northern Islands is hosts thousands of happy Festival-goers. Other annual FESTIVALS in the Faroe Islands include Fjarafestivalurin, Christian MUSIC Festival and Summartonar, Festival for classical and CONTEMPORARY MUSIC, including JAZZ and experimental. Faroes also hosts what is probably the smallest Folk MUSIC Festival in the world-sometimes described as hidden Festival as it is primarily promoted by word of mouth. The latest festival news is Winter JAZZ Days taking place during the cold dark winter months of January and February. Since 1983, Nordic House in Torshavn has been an active contributor to the Faroese MUSIC scene. Every year, this prime venue offers high-quality performances from around the world. On a smaller scale, TUTL, record company, offer weekly free concerts in their shop in Torshavn city centre and numerous smaller venues regularly promote live MUSIC. ISLAND JAZZ. Since the foundation of the local JAZZ Club in 1975, the Faroe Islands JAZZ scene has been active. Current artists include Yggdrasil, cross-national collaboration lead by Kristian Blak, founder and owner of TUTL, which is the largest record company in Faroes. TUTL is collectively owned by musicians and composers, who have released their MUSIC through label, and is unique amongst labels as it emphasise total artistic freedom. TUTL shop in Torshavn is the only MUSIC store in the world that is dedicated to Faroese MUSIC. Other JAZZ artists includeMagnus Johannesen, best known for his lyrical playing and melodic perspective.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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