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Frieze (magazine)

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Last Updated: 02 July 2021

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Frieze (magazine)

Frequency8 per year
FounderAmanda Sharp, Matthew Slotover and Tom Gidley
First issue1991 ( 1991-month )
CompanyFrieze Publishing Ltd.
CountryUnited Kingdom
Based inLondon
LanguageEnglish
Websitefrieze .com /editorial
ISSN0962-0672
Facebookfriezemagazine

From November 1 2020, all UK posts will be delivered in good time and overseas orders * are being sent by Airmail again! We've decided to take a financial blow to help get our service to you back to how it should be; speedy Overseas delivery, especially in time FOR Christmas. Relax, you're travelling in First Class with Newsstand. Suspended Countries * Please note that there is no postal service to the following locations at this time: Azerbaijan, Botswana, Cuba, Haiti, Iraq, Kosovo, Mauritania, Mauritius, Nepal, Paraguay, Turkmenistan, Venezuela, Zambia buy Single Copy of FRIEZE or Subscription of your desired length, deliver worldwide. Current issues send same day up to 3pm! All Magazines are sent by 1 Class Mail UK & by Airmail worldwide. This magazine is well produced with a high quality layout. The magazine is produced in London, so it always has its ears close to the ground FOR latest news. There will be around 200 pages per issue which are all packed with everything the culture obsessed reader will need to know. It will contain extensive listings of the best exhibitions and galleries from all over the world as well as fascinating features on the best new talented artists around. FRIEZE likes to produce features on various different artist portfolios which display an in-depth look at the work of a select few brilliant new artists. The content is extremely detailed and really tries to discuss work in as much detail as possible. Readers will feel fully in know about the reasons behind artistas ' work and what inspires them after reading these sections. FRIEZE Art Fair is an annual exhibition which is also connected to the Magazine. It takes place every October in Regentas Park in London. It will feature work from over 170 of the most mesmerizing Modern Art galleries in the world. The fair will also include specially commissioned artistsa projects and brilliant talks which will reveal secrets and unknown information about amazing art artwork This Fair is one of very few art fairs which will focus solely on Modern Art made by living artists. FRIEZE Magazine will, of course, bring you all the gossip and great photography from the event if you do manage to get yourself a ticket.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

History

About Frieze Frieze is a media and events company that comprises three publications, Frieze Magazine, Frieze Masters Magazine and Frieze Week; and four international Art fairs, Frieze London, Frieze LA, Frieze New York and Frieze Masters; regular talks and summits, lead by Frieze editors; and Frieze. Com-definitive resource for contemporary art and culture. History Frieze was founded in 1991 by Amanda Sharp, Matthew Slotover and Tom Gidley with the launch of Frieze Magazine, leading magazine of contemporary art and culture. Sharp and Slotover established Frieze London in 2003, one of the world's most influential contemporary art fairs which take place each October in Regents Park, London. In 2012, Frieze launch Frieze New York taking place in May; and Frieze Masters, which coincide with Frieze London in October and is dedicated to art from ancient to modern. In 2019, Frieze open its first edition in Los Angeles at Paramount Pictures Studios, taking place in February.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sampler: Frieze magazine

One of the last preparations before doors open for the Frieze Art Fair tonight is the installation of Richard Longs mud painting at Londons Lisson Gallery. Mud is applied directly to the wall, and the floor needs to be covered with protective sheet. When work is finish, there is a clean black line along the bottom of the wall that draws eye. In an environment where everything is slick, work stands out as a refreshing example of healthy earthiness. Now in its 11 year, Frieze London 2013 host some 170 exhibitors, attesting to fair status in the global art market. Exhibitors represent 34 countries, making this year, according to organizers, Fair most international outing yet. Countless satellite fairs like Moving Image and strarta have spring up, and London galleries schedule exhibitions of their biggest hitters to coincide with fairs opening; see Tim Noble and Sue Webster at Blain Southern. At preview, all familiar faces from the art establishment were present: museum directors like Nicholas Penny, Ralph Rugoff and Nicholas Serota, as are artists like Grayson Perry, Anish Kapoor and Martin Creed. If Frieze truly is nothing more than a temple of consumerism at its most devout, then the altarpiece is Jeff Koons's bronze megaliths of lobsters, kittens and candies, showing at Gagosian Gallery. The rumor 10 million price tag reinforces the notion that cash is king. Yet only a booth away, at Berlin's Esther Schipper, Pierre Huyghe's aquarium work house horseshoe and arrow crabs—this living ecosystem is utterly unconcerned with cash flow. Even if his aquarium pieces do come with a price tag of 165 000 each and a life span of 15 years, here prehistoric life forms that pre-date all this, as the Gallery representative describes it, are top of the food chain. Still, chief traffic is buyers. Dealers in the Frame section, reserve for 18 galleries found post-2003 all tell AiA that sales were good. There are some lively examples here, like Berlin-base artist Ryan Siegan-Smiths work concerning memory and mnemonic techniques in a mixture of video, installation and drawing at Malmos Johan Berggren. Seemingly everyone's favorite was Marlie Muls sand and resin puddles at Milans Fluxia, for about 5 500. In main exhibitors section, Laura Bartlett is returning for her fifth year with Sampler of artists including Cyprien Galliard, Nina Beir, Ian Law and Allison Katz. Art fairs are where the relationship between gallerist and artist is both least and most romantic, London dealer tell AiA, but underlying everything is the same yearning, seeking out treasure. No one is forthcoming about what they are selling, for how much and to whom, but AiA do overhear one dealer comparing shopping styles. Europeans walk round for days writing notes, then do all their buying on Sunday. If Americans want it, they buy it on the spot.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Maximum Bidding

Thanks to Covid-19, none of that is happening this year, leaving this event-driven industry rudderless. Almost all fairs are canceled although 1: 54 Contemporary African Art Fair press ahead at Somerset House this week in par down version of 28 gallery displays plus online viewing rooms. Frieze launch its own digital version this week, though some participants will hold exhibitions in their galleries in tandem with virtual event. Such online-offline hybrid defines the coronavirus-era Art market. Livestreamed bricks-and-clicks evening sales have enabled big auction houses such as Christies and Sothebys to create some sense of occasion for their most high-value sales. This week, Christies will hold livestreamed Sale from its New York saleroom, ostensibly of 20th century Art but bizarrely including Stan, 67-million-year-Old Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton. The crisis has exposed art market vulnerabilities, said Anders Petterson of analysts ArtTactic. In March, he say, It go into cardiac arrest none of the traditional ways of doing business work. He add: systemic shift is happening which had to happen. If it wasnt this crisis, there would have been another. Petterson points to economist Dr Clare McAndrews ' recent report on the impact of Covid-19 on galleries, commissioned by Art Basel and UBS, which found a 36 percent decline in global gallery sales in the first half of 2020. Similarly, ArtTactics own recent study, Hiscox online Art trade report 2020, found auction sales dropped 49 percent in the first half of the year. Though stock markets are tumbling, Sothebys CEO Charles F. Stewart says he is not seeing many distressed sales of art as yet, although he concedes a couple of high-profile examples. No doubt this refers to Sothebys Sale of works from the British Airways collection earlier in July and the ongoing sell-off of a glut of works from American billionaire Ronald Perelmans collection, which have so far total over 100 million. Stewart is now waiting to get through the uncertainty of the US election on 3 November, after which he expects consignments to pick up. Unbelievably, before the lockdown mega-gallery Hauser & Wirth never held online shows. That changed fast since March, It has had over 1. 2 million visitors to its platform and has now developed its own VR technology. Neil Wenman, partner at the gallery, said they had to question outdated ideas about selling art digitally: What we think was maximum value We could sell online, that glass ceiling has smash. The Gallery sold the most expensive work from Frieze New Yorks online viewing room in May New painting by George Condo for 2 m and has since sold work north of £10m via email, Wenman say. This does not appear to be dampening rising interest in women artists and artists of colour so long as theyre fairly establish. In Tsingous view, market is correcting itself, taking its lead from museums addressing gaps in their collections: growing interest in women and artists of colour is not a market trend, but a new reality.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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