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Hilda Vaughan

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Hilda Vaughan

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Hilda Campbell Vaughan was a Welsh novelist and short story writer. She was the author of ten different novels, set mostly in her native Radnorshire and concerning rural communities and heroines, beginning with Battle to Weak in 1925. Her last novel Was Candle and Light, published in 1954. She was married to the writer Charles Langbridge Morgan, who had an influence on her writings. Although favourably received by her contemporaries, Vaughan received minimal critical attention in subsequent years. Rediscovery of her work began in the 1980s and 1990s, particularly, as part of renewed analysis of Welsh Literature in English. Life Early years Vaughan was born in Builth Wells, Powys, then county of Breconshire, into a prosperous family, youngest daughter of Hugh Vaughan Vaughan and Eva. Her father was a successful Country solicitor and held various public offices in the neighbouring county of Radnorshire. She was a descendant of 17-century poet Henry Vaughan. Vaughan was educated privately, and remained at home until the outbreak of the First World War in 1914, after which she served in a Red Cross hospital and for the Women's Land Army in Breconshire and Radnorshire. Her work bring her into contact with women living on local farms, and would become influence on her writing. At the end of the War, she left home for London, and whilst attending a Writing course at Bedford College, meets novelist Charles Langbridge Morgan. They married on 6 June 1923 and afterwards took a flat together in Chelsea, where they lived for nine years. In December of the following year, Vaughan gave birth to the couple's first child, Elizabeth Shirley. First major writing on her husband's advice, Vaughan decided not to publish Invader as her first novel. Instead, she opted to publish Battle to Weak, whose manuscript Morgan had extensively edit; both being writers, couple offer guidance and advice on each other's work. According to Christopher Newman, though her literary technique would develop throughout her career, this novel contains virtually all themes developed in her later work, especially those of duty and self-sacrifice. The novel was very favourably receive, with reviews noting the accomplished character of work, even though it was her first. In 1926, Vaughan gave birth to the couple's second child, Roger. The success of her first novel was repeated in this same year with the publication of the novel Here Are Lovers; when Invader was finally published in 1928, it was also favourably receive, considered by Country Life to be 'one of the best novels of the year'. Her next two novels, Her Father's House and Soldier and Gentlewoman, were also critically acclaim. The latter, probably her most successful novel, was dramatise and shown at Vaudeville Theatre, London. Vaudeville Theatre, London, c.

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* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Works

In Harvest Home, published in 1936, Hilda Vaughan takes the tradition of Gothic historical novel and reworks it into a powerfully distinctive Welsh form. A lyrical and carefully-researched evocation of rural life on the south-west coast of Wales during the reign of George III, Harvest Home is also tautly-write psychological parable of dangers of male desire. Set in the the of the Napoleonic Wars and against the threat of invasion by Corsican Ogre, this is a parable of the past which had particular resonance in the mid-1930s as clouds of Fascism gathered in Europe. While the title might initially appear to evoke bucolic delights of rural Folk celebrating gathering-in of grain and hay against winter, Vaughan exploits the long-standing motif of reaper and Reaping as a metaphor for Death within the seasonal cycle. Whatever man soweth, that shall he also reap, is the epigraph to Part I, taken from Paul's Epistle to Galatians in New Testament. Three parts of this gripping novel-Seed-time, Wheat and Tares, and Reaping-move with the economical but inexorable force of a three-act play towards tragic climax. The novel opens with Return of Native. One fine morning, Daniel Hafod came back from England to take his place as Master of Great House, property which he had inherited on the death of his uncle, in part because of the conniving of his mother. Passing crossroads flanked by gallows and graveyard, he came face to face with his inheritance. Surveying sturdy old mansion set amongst white-wash barns and stables within a patchwork of fields spread across the cwm, he smiled in triumph: Mine, say Daniel to himself All Mine, he repeat; and understood the meaning of words as happy as King. Along with House, he inherits servants, including two young servant girls: pretty, modest Eiluned Owain and dark, provocative Lizzie. It is Eiluned who intrigues and attracts him, but she is already, almost unknowingly, in love with his older cousin, also named Dan Hafod. Dan is a sailor who has been disinherited by his uncle because he refuses to bow to old mans will for money. While Daniel becomes increasingly obsessed with Eiluned, she is won by Dans ' tender and honest regard for her. Despite Daniel's power and money, she strives to remain steadfast even when she thinks Dan is losing at sea. Like the title and epigraphs, the naming of double characters-Daniel Hafod and Dan Hafod, Eiluned and Lizzie-suggest that we need to read this novel not just as a realist historical novel but also symbolically, as allegory or parable. The name Great House and surname Hafod reinforce symbolic focus on the significance of House or Home. A house, of course, is not necessarily a home.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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