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Hip Hop New York

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Last Updated: 18 November 2020

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General | Latest Info

Hip-hop starts out in parks and travels around the globe and back, picking up new accents and flavors in every region and time zone, rubbing elbows with other genres and cultures, and adapting to new climates and temperaments. But the spark that inspired early bombers, breakers, DJs, and rappers to revolutionize art, dance, fashion, music, and language endures in New York City, changing alongside advancing generations. When kids in the Bronx needed party music to distract from the violent tumult of the rocky 70s, DJ Kool Herc figured out how to extend the climaxes of funk records, making long and euphoric vamps out of sweet seconds of ecstasy. Drum-machine fanatics take after forward-thinking auteurs like Prince and Miles Davis, assembling clattering, inhuman percussion parts that would lead to epochal early-80s gems like Run-DMCs Sucker MCs. Happy studio accident in the late 80s inspired Queens native and Cold Chillin crew member Marley Marl to invent the art of sampling, setting the stage for plush jazz-rap stylings of acts like Tribe call Quest and abrasive kung fu rap of Wu-Tang Clan in the 90s as well as the triumphant sounds of Diplomats Dipset Anthem and Jay-Zs Public Service Announcement in next decade. As regionalism in rap begins to ebb and artists from East, South, West, Midwest, and overseas begin trying out one anothers war, stars like 50 Cent and later Nicki Minaj dominate via annexation, picking and choosing bits of popular sounds and fashions to graft onto their formidable arsenals of tricks. To decide the best New York rap would only tell half story uneven one, so instead, we invited a team of writers to rank new type of local canon: 100 songs that capture a bigger picture of the sound of the city. Old heads will tell you that New York rap is distinct sound rooted in thunder-and-lightning interplay between kick and snare drums in East Coast boom-bap track, but really, its attitude, way to be. Its noisy, flashy style Harlem folks pick up across 125 Street and gruff, no-nonsense speech of Brooklynites, insular slang of Queensbridge projects and the versatile blend of cultures you see on trip through the Bronx. The enduring spirit of New York hip-hop is unbridled confidence, limitless audacity. It manifests itself through aspiring musicians boosting sound systems during the 1977 blackout, then turning into professional DJs seemingly overnight; through Run-DMC securing their first rap endorsement deal after repping shell-toe Adidas so hard in their music; through 14-year-old Roxanne Shante flaming UTFO in Roxannes Revenge; through Raekwons mob epics and Ghostfaces psychedelic crime stories; through Camron getting shot three times and driving himself to hospital in Lamborghini, dripping in diamonds; through Jadaki devilish signature laugh and Azealia Bankss withering snark; through Bobby Shmurdas gravity-defying hat and Pop Smokes guttural snarl. The spirit of New York hip-hop springs eternal.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Before Love & Hip Hop

It's been seven years since producer Mona Scott-Young introduced the world to the Love & Hip Hop franchise and though it may not feel like it, lot of the cast have come and go. Airing with the original cast in 2011, then-four member cast show chronicle lives of two Hip-Hop girlfriends, one singer, and one rapper. Since then, show and cast have gotten much bigger. Here's where some of the show's most memorable stars are now. Since his time on the show end, he and Lampkin appear in their own VH1 spin-off, Chrissy & Mr. Jones for two seasons. In 2016, he and Lampkin appeared in another reality show titled Jim & Chrissy: Vow or Never that aired on WeTV. In early 2018, couple will also appear on another WeTV franchise: Marriage Boot Camp Reality Stars. Currently, TMZ reports he is facing five felony charges after being arrested in June in Georgia. Since his days of being on show have wrap, Budden started his own Podcast, Joe Budden Podcast. He was one of the original hosts for Complex's digital series Everyday Struggle for its inaugural season, and is now hosting REVOLT series State of Culture alongside Remy Ma. He's currently dating former Love & Hip Hop Star Cyn Santana, whom he met after they both left the franchise. The two have a son named Lexington Budden and are confirmed to be returning to season nine of the New York franchise. Before she was a chart-topping rapper, she was a cast member on New York installment of a long-running show. Breakout star of the show's sixth and seventh season, Bronx native quickly became a fan favorite through her fun nature and quick to pop off attitude. Cardi B was involved in many arguments during her time on the show, but none was quite as memorable as the time she was seen on camera throwing her shoe at another cast member during season seven reunion. Once she ended her four-year-run as big, bad Mena, singer was engaged to rapper and actor Shad bow Wow moss, but they later split. She also wrote two books, chronicles of confirm Bachelorette and underneath It All. She has appeared in shows such as CSI: Cyber and Masters of None, and was one of the main contestants of VH1's scar Famous in 2017. Appearing as part of the founding cast, Emily Bustamante makes a strong impression in just a few episodes. At the time of the show's premiere, stylist showcased the aftermath of the breakup between her and longtime boyfriend and rapper, Fabolous. During her time on the show, it was revealed that Fabolous cheated on her with Kimbella during her pregnancy. The whole situation produced a brawl that would go down in Love & Hip Hop history.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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