Advanced searches left 3/3
Search only database of 8 mil and more summaries

Hospice And End Of Life Care

Summarized by PlexPage
Last Updated: 02 July 2021

* If you want to update the article please login/register

General | Latest Info

End - of - life Care can be provided in a variety of settingswhich are greatly dependent upon the level of care that is require, resources that are available, and patients ' goals for care. Hospice Care is for individuals who have been diagnosed with terminal illness and are certified as having a life expectancy of 6 months or less. Patients can receive Hospice Care in various settingsincluding, at home, hospital, long - term Care facility, or free - standing Hospice facility. Care is focused on comfortnot on recoveryand is provided by an interdisciplinary team that addresses physical, psychosocial, and spiritual needs. For those who are eligible, care relating to admitting diagnosis to hospice is covered under Medicare / Medicaid Hospice Benefit. Private insurance may cover some costs, depending upon policy. If there is cost to patients or families, it is typically based on sliding scale fee structurehowever,. Hospices cannot refuse care due to patients ' inability to pay. Although Hospice Care always includes palliative Care, individuals with severe illnesses who require pain and symptom managementbut do not necessarily have a life expectancy of 6 months or lesscan benefit greatly from stand - alone palliative Care. Palliative Care programs that are separate from Hospice provide comfort care, but offer the option of continued focus on curative Care. Services can be received in any settingwith support provided by an interdisciplinary team of Healthcare professionals who are palliative Care experts and skilled at discussing end - of - life Care goals. Palliative Care is covered in the same way as other medical services. Most insurance plans, including Medicare and Medicaid, cover all or part of palliative Care costs. Studies of hospitalized patients show that when patients are receiving care from a palliative Care team, they are less likely to end up in intensive Care unitwhich, better aligns with end - of - life preferences for many patients and decreases hospital costs. The ability for individuals to benefit from home - base care is largely dependent upon whether they have need resources to receive care in this setting. This is intrinsically linked with patients ' goals for care, patients condition, and the amount and quality of caregiving support available. There are numerous benefits for patients who receive end - of - life care at home, including the ability to remain in a familiar and comfortable settingand ability to enjoy more autonomy regarding care, visitors, and the environment. Costs for home - base care are highly dependent upon the type, intensity, and frequency of care that is needed. Care may be provided by Hospice, community - base palliative Care programs, home health agencies, professional caregivers, and family members. Payment sources are dependent upon care needs and eligibility, and include Medicare and Medicaid, private and long - term Care insurance, Department of Veterans Affairs, and patient and family resources. If not covered by other resources, patients and families often cover costs of home Health Aide and homemaker servicesboth of which can be approximately $20 per hour.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Understanding Palliative Care

For individuals living with serious illnesses and for their caregiving family and friends, Palliative Care offers medical and related treatment towards living as well and as fully as possible. Healthcare professionals embrace patients ' values, goals, and wishes when considering disease management and burden relief from pain, anxiety, fear, and other symptoms. Patients ' plans and wishes are shared with family and friends who provide care, and support is provided to help relieve burdens. Most importantly, this patient / family - Center Care is appropriate at any age and at any stage in serious or chronic illness. For example, person with cancer may be treated for unrelenting pain and appetite loss concurrent with curative treatment; person living with Alzheimer's disease may be treated for anxiety and sleeplessness. Care may be offered in hospital,s long - term care facility,s at home, or in outpatient clinics. First used in 15 century, term Palliative today means to remedy or lessen without curing. Although in the past, Palliative Care and hospice Care were bind together, now they can consider two related approaches that respond to serious illnesses depending on patients ' condition and wishes. They share similar philosophies, and person in Palliative Care may transition to hospice Care if they are approaching the end of life. Looking deeper into concept, National Consensus Project on Palliative Care describes it this way: Palliative Care is both philosophy of care and organize, highly structured system for delivering care. The goal of Palliative Care is to prevent and relieve suffering and to support the best possible quality of life for patients and their families, regardless of stage of disease or need for other therapies. Palliative Care expands traditional disease - model medical treatments to include goals of enhancing quality of life for patients and family members, helping with decision making, and providing opportunities for personal growth. Palliative Care can be rendered along with life - prolonging treatment or as the main focus of care. What is an organize, highly structured system, and how has it come to be so widespread now in healthcare? First, Palliative Care takes a collaborative, interdisciplinary team approach. In addition to patients and family, specially trained team can consist of: doctors, registered nurses, social workers, chaplains, dieticians, pharmacists, licensed mental health professionals, physical and occupational therapists, music therapists, massage therapists, and others. Most common health conditions addrest in Palliative Care include: cancer, Congestive heart failure, kidney failure, liver failure, Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or other lung diseases, HIV / AIDS, Spinal cord injuries, brain diseases such as stroke, ALS, or Parkinsons, Multiple sclerosis, Alzheimers and other dementias when patients choose to begin Palliative Care, they receive formal assessment of their Health early in process. Symptoms most commonly addressed include: pain or discomfort, Shortness of breath, Fatigue, Anxiety, Depression, Lack of appetite, Nausea Constipation Adjusting to and living with the diagnosis of serious health conditions Sleep problems. There will be discussions about the need for an Advance Directive and preferences about withholding or withdrawing Life - sustaining treatments.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Understanding Hospice Care

Hospice Care is for terminally ill people who's expected to have six months or less to live. But Hospice Care can be provided for as long as the person's doctor and Hospice Care team certify that condition remain life - limiting. Many people who receive Hospice Care have Cancer, while others have heart disease, dementia, kidney failure or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Enrolling in Hospice Care early helps you live better and live longer. Hospice Care decreases the burden on family, decreases the family's likelihood of having complicated grief and prepares family members for their loved one's death. Hospices also allow patients to be cared for at facility for a period of time, not because the patient needs it, but because family caregivers need a break. This is known as respite Care.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Late Stage and End-of-Life Care

Table

ProblemsComforting care
Not eatingFeed small spoonfuls of food. Use ice chips or a damp sponge to keep the mouth moist.
Dryness around the faceUse a damp cloth to relieve dryness around the eyes. Apply lip balm or petroleum jelly to the lips.
Labored breathingGently turn the person's head, adjust pillows or raise the head of the bed. Use a cool-mist humidifier. Ask the medical team about medication or the use of oxygen.
Skin irritationGently apply lotion to dry skin. Learn how to move and adjust the person safely in bed to avoid the development of sores.
IncontinenceLearn how to change incontinence pads or ask about the use of a catheter.
Agitation, confusionSpeak calmly and be reassuring. Hold hands or use a gentle touch if it's comforting. Remind the person where he or she is and who is there. Ask the medical team for help if significant agitation occurs.
PainGive pain medication as directed. Ask the medical team to adjust medication if needed.
Sensitivity to temperaturePay attention to clues to whether the person feels hot or cold. Adjust the room temperature and bedding as needed.

Dementia often progresses slowly and unpredictably. Experts suggest that signs of the final stage of Alzheimer's disease include some of the following: Being unable to move around on ones own Being unable to speak or make oneself understood. Needing help with most, if not all, daily activities, such as eating and self - care. Eating problems such as difficulty swallowing because of their unique experience with what happens at the end of life, hospice and palliative care experts might be able to help identify when someone in final stage of Alzheimers disease is in last days or weeks of life.


What does hospice care provide?

Palliative Care may also be called supportive care, symptom management, or comfort Care. It can be given separately from Hospice Care, but it's often part of Hospice Care if cancer is no longer being treated because it has worsen. Palliative Care does not treat cancer itself. Instead, it's used to prevent or treat symptoms and side effects as early as possible. As part of Hospice Care, Palliative Care looks at how the cancer experience affects the whole person and helps to relieve symptoms, pain, and stress. It gives patients options and allows them and their caregivers to take part in planning their care. It is about assuring them that all their care needs are address. Specialize professionals who are part of Palliative Care team can help look for and manage mental, physical, emotional, social, and spiritual issues that may come up. The main goal of including Palliative Care in Hospice services is to help patients be comfortable while allowing them to enjoy the last stage of life. This means that discomfort, pain, nausea, and other side effects are managed to make sure that you feel as good as possible, yet are alert enough to enjoy people around you and make important decisions.


Signs of approaching death

Death from cancer usually occurs after a person has become weaker and more tired over several weeks or months. It is not always possible to predict how long someone will live. But some common signs and symptoms show that a person is entering the final weeks and days of life. Knowing what to expect helps relieve anxiety and allows better planning. The following are signs and symptoms that suggest person with cancer may be entering the final weeks of life: worsening weakness and exhaustion. Need to sleep much of the time, often spending most of the day in bed or resting. Weight loss and muscle thinning or loss. Minimal or no appetite and difficulty eating or swallowing fluids. Decrease ability to talk and concentrate. Little interest in doing things that were previously important. Loss of interest in the outside world, news, politics, entertainment, and local events. Wanting to have only a few people nearby and limiting time spent with visitors. As the last days of life approach, you may see the following signs and symptoms: breathing may slow, sometimes with very long pauses between breaths. Noisy breathing, with congestion and gurgling or rattling sounds as person becomes unable to clear fluids from their throat. These sounds may concern others, but the person who is dying is not aware of them. Cool skin that may turn bluish, dusky color, especially in people's hands and feet. Dryness of mouth and lips. Decreased amount of urine. Loss of bladder and bowel control. Restlessness or repetitive, involuntary movements. Confusion about time, place, and identity of people, including family members and close friends. Seeing or hearing people or things that are not there. This is common and usually normal. It is not cause for concern unless these hallucinations scare or upset person who is ill. These dream - like experiences often include traveling, preparing for travel, or being welcomed by people who have die. Tendency to drift in and out of consciousness and gradually becoming less and less responsive to touch or voice. Of course, every person is different. Signs and symptoms that people experience vary. And the order in which signs and symptoms occur may differ.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Know the Difference

This is for people who have learnt from doctors that they are not expect to recover from their condition. Itas about easing pain and helping families prepare for the end of life. Palliative care is part of that, but is just one part. People in hospice care generally expected to have less than 6 months to live. They are often at home, where family members and professional caregivers look after them. But you could also choose a specialized center for hospice care. Itas also offered at many nursing homes and hospitals. This kind of care can involve not only doctors and nurses, but also family members, clergy, counselors, or social workers who can address the grief of dying and emotions that often come with it.


What Is Palliative Care?

This program aims to ease pain and help with other problems if your illness is serious but not considered to be life - threatening for now. It helps people live with symptoms of long - running things such as cancer, kidney disease or AIDS, or with side effects of treatments. Palliative medicine does replace other treatments. In addition, that helps you and your family deal with things such as nausea, nerve pain, or shortness of breath. If illness makes it harder to work, play, get around, or causes depression, Palliative Care can address that, too. People have said they feel more in control of their lives as a result. Even in cases where illness is expected to be fatal, this type of care can help you live an active life as possible.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Signs That Death Is Near

This information has been written for caregiver,s but many patients want this same information for themselves. It gives some signs that death may be close and gives caregivers some ideas about ways they may be able to help. Signs of death being near can be different for each person. No one can really predict what may happen at the end of life, how long the final stage of life will last, or when death will actually happen. Sometimes death comes quickly due to unexpected event or problem. Other times, dying process moves slowly and patients seem to linger. If possible, it is important to have a plan for what to do just following death, so that caregivers and other people who are with patients know what to do during this very emotional time. If a patient is in hospice, hospice nurse and social worker will help you. If patient is not in hospice, talk with doctor so that you will know exactly what to do at the time of death. Just like the timing of the dying process cannot be predict, it's also hard to predict what exactly will happen in the final stage of life and especially near death. The following symptoms are examples of what may happen in some people with cancer who are dying. While not all may happen, it may help you to know about them.


3. Labored Breathing

Understand that this is a natural part of the dying process and at this point your loved one is unaware of change breathing. Talk with your hospice nurse about options for medical patches to help dry up some secretions. Position your loved one in ways that reduce the work it takes to breathe. Such as, elevating head or sitting up slightly with pillows and adequate support. Keep lips and mouth moisten with wet cloth, moisturizer or lip balm. Your hospice nurse may educate you that suctioning secretions is not advise as this will trigger physiological response for the body to produce more secretions. Morphine may be used to treat air hunger as it decreases the heart's urge to have more oxygen. Introducing morphine can be scary for families. Talk openly and honestly with your hospice team about your feelings and and listen to their expert advice.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

When to Say Good-bye

These days, everyone from poets to professors, priests, and everyday folks all opine about what makes a good death. In truth, deaths are nearly as unique as lives that come before them, shaped by a combination of attitudes, physical conditions, medical treatments and people involve. A Good Death can, and should, mean different things to different people, says Haider Warraich, MD, author of Modern Death - How Medicine changes the End of Life. To me, it means achieving the end that one would Have want, and that can really mean everything from being in an intensive care unit, getting all sorts of life - sustaining therapies, to being at home, surrounded by family, getting hospice care. Still, many have pointed to a few common factors that can help death seem good and even inspiring as opposed to frightening, sad or tortuous. By most standards, good death is one in which a person dies on his own terms, relatively free from pain, in a support and dignified setting. I think what makes a good Death is really different for every individual, but there are some common threads that occur with each person Ive see, say Michelle Wulfestieg, executive director of Southern California Hospice Foundation and author of All We Have is Today: Story of Discovering Purpose. Some of patients ' most common End - of - Life priorities include being at peace spiritually, knowing that they have support of loved ones, having their affairs in order and being reassured that they wo have a painful death, says Wulfestieg, who has worked in Hospice care for 14 years. Most Americans say they would prefer to die at home, according to recent polls. Yet the reality is that some three - quarters of the population dies in some sort of medical institution, many of them after spending time in intensive care unit. Part of that may be due to misunderstandings about different options for treating patients ' pain in their final days. There are still people who are uncomfortable with the use of pain medications at the end of life, even as their use is essential for patients who are in pain, says Warraich. As life expectancies increase, more people are becoming proactive. A growing number of aging patients are choosing not to have life - prolonging treatments that might ultimately increase pain and suffering such as invasive surgery or dialysis and deciding instead to have comfort or palliative care through hospice in their final days. Along with practical matters of having one affairs in order, it is equally important to prepare for Death emotionally, to spend time with loving people toward the end of Life, and to have spiritual sustenance. Patients really want to know that their life has purpose, that they make a difference and that their lives matter, says Wulfestieg. It has to do with family lot of times, saying those I love you ` and goodbyes. Schf often works to reunite dying patients with family members, including those who have long been estrange.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Providing Care and Comfort

Table

ProblemsComforting care
Not eatingFeed small spoonfuls of food. Use ice chips or a damp sponge to keep the mouth moist.
Dryness around the faceUse a damp cloth to relieve dryness around the eyes. Apply lip balm or petroleum jelly to the lips.
Labored breathingGently turn the person's head, adjust pillows or raise the head of the bed. Use a cool-mist humidifier. Ask the medical team about medication or the use of oxygen.
Skin irritationGently apply lotion to dry skin. Learn how to move and adjust the person safely in bed to avoid the development of sores.
IncontinenceLearn how to change incontinence pads or ask about the use of a catheter.
Agitation, confusionSpeak calmly and be reassuring. Hold hands or use a gentle touch if it's comforting. Remind the person where he or she is and who is there. Ask the medical team for help if significant agitation occurs.
PainGive pain medication as directed. Ask the medical team to adjust medication if needed.
Sensitivity to temperaturePay attention to clues to whether the person feels hot or cold. Adjust the room temperature and bedding as needed.

Family members should remember that dying is a natural process that will occur on its own timeline. However, there are some steps that caregivers and families can take to make dying patients ' surroundings more peaceful. Because patient needs will vary, your Hospice Care team will help advise you as to what specific actions should be taken to enhance the level of comfort of patient. Below is an overview of potential steps caregivers and families can take to make patients more comfortable: utilize soft padding such as foam in order to make beds and chairs more comfortable for patient. Base upon recommendations of the medical team, assist patients in changing positions. Frequently change bed sheets. To assist with breathing, elevate the patient's head or; help the patient lay on his / her side. Help keep patients warm by using blankets, by gently rubbing their hands and feet, or by soaking hands and feet in warm water. Avoid using electric heating devices such as electric blankets as they may cause irritation and / or burns to patients ' skin. When communicating with patient, use a clear and calm voice. Providing patients with reminders of date, time, place, and people who are present may ease their confusion. It should be noted that these reminders may not benefit all patients. If a patient becomes completely withdrawn, voice supportive reinforcements that do not require any response. Calming phrases such as, everything is OK or, other positive statements recommended by your Hospice team will help to create a calm and peaceful ambience. If patient can swallow, help to keep lips and mouth moist by offering small sips of liquid using a straw or spoon. There are certain swabs and lip balms that can also be used to combat dryness in the mouth and lips. Be present. Helping to ease loneliness is priceless comfort to dying patient. Simply sitting and gently touching patient can help to put them more at ease.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

When To Call For Help

There are ways to make a person who is dying more comfortable. Discomfort can come from a variety of problems. For each, there are things you or healthcare provider can do, depending on the cause. For example, dying person can be uncomfortable because of: pain, breathing problems, skin irritation, digestive problems, temperature sensitivity, fatigue pain. Watching someone you love die is hard enough, but thinking that person is also in pain makes it worse. Not everyone who is dying experiences pain, but there are things you can do to help someone who does. Experts believe that care for someone who is dying should focus on relieving pain without worrying about possible long - term problems of drug dependence or abuse. Don't be afraid of giving as much pain medicine as is prescribed by your doctor. Pain is easier to prevent than to relieve, and severe pain is hard to manage. Try to make sure that level of pain does not get ahead of pain - relieving medicines. Tell doctor or nurse if pain is not being control. Medicines can increase or change. If this doesn't help, then ask for consultation with a palliative medical specialist who has experience in pain management for seriously ill patients. Struggling with severe pain can be draining. It can make it hard for families to be together in a meaningful way. Pain can affect moodbeing, in pain can make someone seem angry or short - temper. Although understandable, irritability resulting from pain might make it hard to talk, hard to share thoughts and feelings. Breathing problems. Shortness of breath or feeling that breathing is difficult is a common experience at the end of life. A doctor might call this dyspnea. Worrying about next breath can make it hard for important conversations or connections. Try raising the head of bed, opening window, using a humidifier, or having a fan circulating air in the room. Sometimes, morphine or other pain medications can help relieve the sense of breathlessness. People very near death might have noisy breathing, sometimes called death rattle. This is caused by fluids collecting in the throat or by throat muscles relaxing. It might help to try turning person to rest on one side. There is also medicine that can be prescribed that may help clear this up. Not all noise breathing is death rattle. It may help to know that this noisy breathing is usually not upsetting to dying person, even if it is to family and friends. Skin irritation. Skin problems can be very uncomfortable. With age, skin naturally becomes drier and more fragile, so it is important to take extra care with older person's skin. Gently applying alcohol - free lotion can relieve dry skin and be soothing. Dryness on parts of the face, such as lips and eyes, can be a common cause of discomfort near death. Lip balm could keep this from getting worse. Damp cloth placed over closed eyes might relieve dryness.


Should I contact hospice?

A person of any age is eligible for Hospice Care after being certified by a physician as having a life expectancy that may be six months or less, depending on the course of their disease. Another requirement is that patients who elect hospice must forgo curative treatment, either because they no longer wish to receive it or because it is no longer effective. For example, if a patient is diagnosed with advanced cancer and given four months to live, in order to receive services, they must only receive care for symptom management and enhancement of their quality of life. This comfort care is provided in lieu of aggressive interventions such as chemotherapy and / or radiation therapy. Of course, even terminal health conditions do not progress in a predictable manner. If a patient lives beyond six months after admission into the hospice program, they can continue receiving services as long as physicians continue to document their eligibility. In some rare cases, individuals remain eligible for and receive Hospice Care for a year or longer. Hospice services are covered by Medicare, Medicaid and most private health insurance plans, although many non - profit Palliative Care providers generally offer services regardless of persons ability to pay.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

AT THE TIME OF DEATH

Table

ProblemsComforting care
Not eatingFeed small spoonfuls of food. Use ice chips or a damp sponge to keep the mouth moist.
Dryness around the faceUse a damp cloth to relieve dryness around the eyes. Apply lip balm or petroleum jelly to the lips.
Labored breathingGently turn the person's head, adjust pillows or raise the head of the bed. Use a cool-mist humidifier. Ask the medical team about medication or the use of oxygen.
Skin irritationGently apply lotion to dry skin. Learn how to move and adjust the person safely in bed to avoid the development of sores.
IncontinenceLearn how to change incontinence pads or ask about the use of a catheter.
Agitation, confusionSpeak calmly and be reassuring. Hold hands or use a gentle touch if it's comforting. Remind the person where he or she is and who is there. Ask the medical team for help if significant agitation occurs.
PainGive pain medication as directed. Ask the medical team to adjust medication if needed.
Sensitivity to temperaturePay attention to clues to whether the person feels hot or cold. Adjust the room temperature and bedding as needed.

Comfort care is an essential part of medical care at the end of life. It is care that helps or soothes person who is dying. Goals are to prevent or relieve suffering as much as possible and to improve the quality of life while respecting dying person's wishes. You are probably reading this because someone close to you is dying. You wonder what will happen. You want to know how to give comfort, what to say, what to do. You might like to know how to make dying easier to help ensure peaceful death, with treatment consistent with dying person's wishes. A peaceful death might mean something different to you than to someone else. Your sister might want to know when death is near so she can have a few last words with people she loves and take care of personal matters. Your husband might want to die quickly and not linger. Perhaps your mother has said she would like to be at home when she die, while your father wants to be in hospital where he can receive treatment for his illness until the very end. Some people want to be surrounded by family and friends; others want to be alone. Of course, often one doesn't get to choose. But, avoiding suffering, having your end - of - life wishes follow, and being treated with respect while dying are common hopes. Generally speaking, people who are dying need care in four areas: physical comfort, mental and emotional needs, spiritual issues, and practical tasks. Their families need support as well. In this section, you will find a number of ways you can help someone who is dying. Always remember to check with your healthcare team to make sure these suggestions are appropriate for your situation.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

SAFE MEDICATION DISPOSAL

Table

ProblemsComforting care
Not eatingFeed small spoonfuls of food. Use ice chips or a damp sponge to keep the mouth moist.
Dryness around the faceUse a damp cloth to relieve dryness around the eyes. Apply lip balm or petroleum jelly to the lips.
Labored breathingGently turn the person's head, adjust pillows or raise the head of the bed. Use a cool-mist humidifier. Ask the medical team about medication or the use of oxygen.
Skin irritationGently apply lotion to dry skin. Learn how to move and adjust the person safely in bed to avoid the development of sores.
IncontinenceLearn how to change incontinence pads or ask about the use of a catheter.
Agitation, confusionSpeak calmly and be reassuring. Hold hands or use a gentle touch if it's comforting. Remind the person where he or she is and who is there. Ask the medical team for help if significant agitation occurs.
PainGive pain medication as directed. Ask the medical team to adjust medication if needed.
Sensitivity to temperaturePay attention to clues to whether the person feels hot or cold. Adjust the room temperature and bedding as needed.

A number of hospices nationwide are hitting barriers to effectively disposing of medications following patients ' death while remaining in compliance with current law and regulation, according to a report released today by the US Government Accountability Office. Proper Disposal of Medications is a critical factor in preventing drug diversion. Drug diversion transfer of Prescription Medication from lawful to unlawful channels of distribution or use is a prevalent issue throughout the health Care continuum. Hospice Providers and other organizations that provide care at home face unique challenges due to potential easy access to Patient Medications. Hospice Care helps patients who are terminally ill maintain their quality of life. Most Patients get Hospice Care at home, which typically includes use of Controlled Substances, including opioids such as oxycodone, to provide pain relief, GAO said in report. When hospice patients die at home, they often leave behind unused control substances, which can be diverted and misused by anyone with access to them. Congress in 2018 approved the Substance Use - Disorder Prevention that promotes Opioid Recovery and Treatment for Patients and Communities Act, which for the first time permits employees of qualified Hospice programs to Dispose of Unused control Substances by collecting and destroying Drugs in Patients ' homes. This was in addition to laws on books in a number of states. The SUPPORT Act requires GAO to report to Congress information on law impact each year. For the 2020 report, GAO interviewed representatives from seven Hospice Providers as well as 11 selected state Hospice associations in addition to staff from Federal agencies and National industry organizations. Since the law enactment, hospices have struggled with the cost of certain disposal methods, unavailability of witness To Disposal process, and inconsistencies between state laws and Federal law concerning which hospice employees may dispose of Controlled Substances, GAO find. Disposal can sometimes be a time - consuming and resource - intensive activity. According to two state Hospice Association officials, sometimes Patients families will ask Disposing Hospice employees to dispose of all of Patients ' Unused Prescription Drugs that remain in home, not only Controlled Substances or Drugs prescribed under Hospice Care, GAO report. Officials from two of our select hospices and two state hospice associations tell the US that it is not atypical for hospice patients to have bags or boxes full of unused medications, though officials do not describe this as a disposal challenge for hospices. The report contains some best practices for Drug Disposal in Compliance with the SUPPORT Act. These included staff education on Controlled Substances and Disposal, use of lockboxes for Medications, Prescription Drug counts, coordination with pharmacies and use of in - home Disposal products, among others. Despite the seriousness of the issue, identifying instances among hospices may be rare. A study published earlier this month in the Journal of American Medical Association found that among 371 hospices that participated in the phone survey, nearly two - thirds had not found incident of diversion in the previous 90 days.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

logo

Plex.page is an Online Knowledge, where all the summaries are written by a machine. We aim to collect all the knowledge the World Wide Web has to offer.

Partners:
Nvidia inception logo

© All rights reserved
2021 made by Algoritmi Vision Inc.

If you believe that any of the summaries on our website lead to misinformation, don't hesitate to contact us. We will immediately review it and remove the summaries if necessary.

If your domain is listed as one of the sources on any summary, you can consider participating in the "Online Knowledge" program, if you want to proceed, please follow these instructions to apply.
However, if you still want us to remove all links leading to your domain from Plex.page and never use your website as a source, please follow these instructions.