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Increase Blood Count

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Last Updated: 02 July 2021

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General | Latest Info

When you do have enough healthy Red blood cells, you have a condition called Anemia. This means your blood has lower than normal hemoglobin levels. Hemoglobin is part of Red Blood cells that carry oxygen to all cells in your body. Anemia is a common side effect in patients with cancer. What causes anemia? There are many different reasons person with cancer might have Anemia. Some common causes are: Cancer itself Cancer treatment, such as radiation or chemotherapy Blood loss missing certain vitamins or minerals in diet because of not eating enough. Low Iron levels in Blood Major organ problems Red Blood cells being destroyed by the body before they replace the body making fewer RBCs Having chronic kidney disease Having conditions like sickle cell disease or thalassemia combination Of any of these factors Some risk factors may make people with Cancer more likely To have Anemia. These include: certain chemotherapy drugs such as platinum - base chemotherapy. Certain tumor types have low hemoglobin level before you have Cancer Symptoms Of Anemia. Anemia often starts slowly, so you may not notice symptoms at first. As your hemoglobin level gets lower, you may have one or more of these symptoms: Fast heartbeat Fast breathing rate Shortness of breath trouble breathing when doing things like walking, climbing stairs, or even talking Dizziness or lightheadedness Chest pain Swelling in hands and / or feet Color of skin, nail beds, mouth, and gums looking more pale than usual Extreme tiredness Anemia can range from mild To life - threatening, Depending on Your hemoglobin level and Symptoms you are experiencing. Some of these symptoms are more serious than others. Your doctor will explain your hemoglobin level and severity of your anemia. If you have any of these symptoms, tell your doctor or nurse right away. If you ca reach your cancer care team right away, you may need to get immediate care in the emergency room. Let your cancer care team know if you have any other medical problems such as heart or lung disease, as this may make your symptoms of anemia worse. It is important to watch for anemia and its symptoms throughout your treatment. Tell your cancer care team if you have any of the symptoms described here. Be sure to mention how symptoms affect your day - to - day life. Doing so will help you get treatment you need when you need it. Tests for causes of Anemia Complete Blood count is a blood test that measures your hemoglobin level and other characteristics of your Red Blood cells. This test not only shows if you have Anemia, but it can also help your doctor figure out what might be causing it. You might also need other tests to help to find what is causing it.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Other lifestyle changes

If you feel constantly exhausted and sluggish, you might have a condition called anemia. Anemia is a common blood disorder that many people develop at some point in their lives. Many types of anemia are mild and short term. But condition can become serious if left untreated for a long time. The good news is that anemia can often be prevented and easily corrected by getting enough iron. Anemia arises when your body doesnt have enough healthy red blood cells. You may either have too few red blood cells, or they may be lacking iron - rich protein called hemoglobin. Red blood cells are responsible for delivering oxygen throughout your body, and hemoglobin is a protein that carries oxygen. When the number of red blood cells or your hemoglobin level is too low, your body doesnt get all of the oxygen it need,sss and that can make you feel very tired. You may also have other symptoms, such as shortness of breath, dizziness, headaches, pale skin, or cold hands and feet. The most common type of anemia occurs when your body lacks iron. This condition is called iron - deficiency anemia, and it often arises if you dont have enough iron in your diet. Your body needs iron and other nutrients to make hemoglobin and healthy red blood cells. So it is important to get a regular supply of iron as well as vitamin B12, folate, and protein. You can get these nutrients by eating a balanced diet or taking dietary supplements. Another common cause of iron - deficiency anemia is blood loss, which might arise from injury, childbirth, or surgery. Women of child - bearing age are at risk for iron - deficiency anemia due to blood loss from menstrual periods. Women also need extra iron during pregnancy. Dr. Harvey Luksenburg, specialist in Blood diseases at NIH, says that if anemia isnt treated during pregnancy, women can give birth to iron - deficient children. This lack of iron can affect children's growth rate and brain development. Women who feel symptoms of sluggishness and fatigue may be iron deficient, Luksenburg say. Even if youve lived with it for a long time, get it checked. 've 've seen startling changes when women are put on iron supplements. Some say theyve never felt better. Many people living with anemia may not realize they have it. They might have mild symptoms or none at all. A doctor can determine whether you have anemia by simple blood test. Common types of anemia can be prevented and treated by eating iron - rich foods. The best sources are red meat, poultry, fish, and shellfish. Other foods high in iron include peas, lentils, beans, tofu, dark green leafy vegetables such as spinach, dry fruits such as prunes and raisins, and iron - fortified cereals and breads. Nih researchers are studying how to treat rarer, more severe forms of anemia. Some types can be treated with medicines. Severe cases may require blood transfusions or surgery. If you dont get enough iron from your food, ask your doctor about taking iron dietary supplements.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

How your doctor can help

Table

Red blood cell countMale: 4.35-5.65 trillion cells/L (4.32-5.72 million cells/mcL) Female: 3.92-5.13 trillion cells/L (3.90-5.03 million cells/mcL)
HemoglobinMale: 13.2-16.6 grams/dL (132-166 grams/L) Female: 11.6-15 grams/dL (116-150 grams/L)
HematocritMale: 38.3-48.6 percent Female: 35.5-44.9 percent
White blood cell count3.4-9.6 billion cells/L (3,400 to 9,600 cells/mcL)
Platelet countMale: 135-317 billion/L (135,000 to 317,000/mcL) Female: 157-371 billion/L (157,000-371,000/mcL)

A Complete blood count is a common blood test that's done for a variety of reasons: to review your overall health. Your doctor may recommend a complete blood count as part of a routine medical examination to monitor your general health and to screen for a variety of disorders, such as anemia or leukemia. To diagnose medical condition. Your doctor may suggest complete blood count if you re experiencing weakness, fatigue, fever, inflammation, bruising or bleeding. A Complete blood count may help diagnose the cause of these signs and symptoms. If your doctor suspects you have an infection, test can also help confirm that diagnosis. To monitor medical condition. If you 've been diagnosed with a blood disorder that affects blood cell counts, your doctor may use complete blood counts to monitor your condition. To monitor medical treatment. A Complete blood count may be used to monitor your health if you re taking medications that may affect blood cell counts.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Take iron supplements

If you need TO raise YOUR hemoglobin level by a lot, you may need TO take oral iron supplements. However, too much iron can cause a condition called hemochromatosis. This can lead to liver diseases such as cirrhosis, and other side effects, such as constipation, nausea, and vomiting. Work with YOUR doctor TO figure out safe dose, and avoid taking more than 25 milligrams at one time. The National Institutes Of Healths Office Of Dietary Supplements recommends that men get up to 8 mg of iron per day, while women should get up to 18 mg per day. If youre pregnant, you should aim for up to 27 mg a day. You should start noticing difference in YOUR Iron level after about week TO month, depending on YOUR underlying condition that causing low hemoglobin. Iron supplements should always be kept carefully out of reach of children. If YOUR child needs an iron supplement, make sure you choose one that is safe for children. Children have lower BLOOD volume, which makes them much more vulnerable TO iron poisoning. If YOUR child accidentally takes iron supplement, call YOUR doctor immediately.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Nutrition and Blood

Are you feeling weak or fatigue? You may be experiencing symptoms of anemia. Anemia occurs when your red blood cell count is low. If your RBC count is low, your body has to work harder to deliver oxygen throughout your body. Rbcs are the most common cells in human blood. The body produces millions each day. Rbcs are produced in bone marrow and circulate around the body for 120 days. Then, they go to liver, which destroys them and recycles their cellular components. Anemia can put you at risk for a number of complications, so it is important to get your RBC levels back on track as soon as possible. Hemoglobin is a protein found in red blood cells. As above, these cells are responsible for carrying oxygen around the body. In addition to transporting oxygen, hemoglobin carries carbon dioxide out of cells and into lungs. Carbon dioxide is then released as person exhales. Having low hemoglobin can make it difficult for the body to perform these functions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Causes of anemia

Table

For men8 mg
For women18 mg
During pregnancy27 mg
While breastfeeding9 mg

Anemia is a medical condition in which the Red Blood Cell count or hemoglobin is less than normal. The normal level of hemoglobin is generally different in males and females. For men, normal hemoglobin level is typically defined as a level of more than 13. 5 grams / 100 ml, and in women as hemoglobin of more than 12. 0 gram / 100 ml. These definitions may vary slightly depending on source and laboratory reference used Any process that can disrupt the normal life span of Red Blood Cells may cause anemia. The normal life span of Red Blood Cells is typically around 120 days. Red blood cells are made in bone marrow. Anemia is caused essentially through two basic pathways. Anemia is caused by either: decrease in production of Red Blood cells or Hemoglobin, or an increase in loss or destruction of Red Blood cells. The more common classification of anemia is based on mean corpuscular volume, which signifies the average volume of individual Red Blood cells. If MCV is low, anemia is categorized as microcytic anemia. If MCV is in the normal range, it is called normocytic anemia. If MCV is high, then it is called macrocytic anemia. Looking at each of the components of complete blood count, especially MCV, physicians can gather clues as to what could be the most common reason for anemia in each patient. Iron deficiency is a very common cause of anemia. This is because iron is a major component of hemoglobin and essential for its proper function. Chronic blood loss due to any reason is the main cause of low Iron level in the body as it depletes the body's iron stores to compensate for ongoing loss of Iron. Anemia that is due to low Iron levels is called Iron deficiency anemia. Young women are likely to have low - grade Iron deficiency anemia because of loss of blood each month through normal menstruation. This is generally without any major symptoms as blood loss is relatively small and temporary. Another common reason for Iron deficiency anemia can be recurring or small ongoing bleeding, for instance from colon cancer or from stomach ulcers. Stomach ulcer bleeding may be induced by medications, even very common over - counter drugs such as aspirin and ibuprofen. Slow and chronic oozing from these ulcers can lead to loss of iron. Crohns disease can lead to Iron deficiency anemia. In infants and young children, Iron deficiency anemia is most often due to a diet lacking Iron. Interpretation of complete blood count test may lead to clues to suggest this type of anemia. For instance, Iron deficiency anemia usually presents with low mean corpuscular volume in addition to low hemoglobin. Aplastic anemia is a life - threatening form of complete bone marrow failure. As a result, blood contains inadequate numbers of red blood cells as well as insufficient white blood cells and platelets.


Symptoms

People with anemia appear pale and may often complain of being cold. Lightheadedness or dizziness, especially when active or standing up, unusual cravings, such as wanting to eat ice, clay, or dirt, trouble concentrating or tiredness, constipation, some types of anemia can cause inflammation of the tongue, resulting in a smooth, glossy, red, and often painful tongue. If anemia is severe, fainting may occur. Other symptoms include: brittle nails, shortness of breath, chest pain. Blood oxygen levels can be so low that person with severe anemia can have a heart attack. If you get physical exam and you have anemia, your results may show: high or low blood pressure, pale skin jaundice, increased heart rate, heart murmur, enlarged lymph nodes, enlarged spleen or liver atrophic glossitis of tongue. People with signs or symptoms of anemia should seek medical attention, especially if fainting or chest pains occur.


Prevention

Many types of anemia can't be prevent. But you can avoid iron deficiency anemia and vitamin deficiency anemia by eating a diet that includes a variety of vitamins and minerals, including: iron. Iron - rich foods include beef and other meats, beans, lentils, iron - fortified cereals, dark green leafy vegetables, and dry fruit. Folate. This nutrient, and its synthetic form folic acid, can be found in fruits and fruit juices, dark green leafy vegetables, green peas, kidney beans, peanuts, and enriched grain products, such as bread, cereal, pasta and rice. Vitamin B - 12. Foods rich in vitamin B - 12 include meat, dairy products, and fortified cereal and soy products. Vitamin C. Foods rich in vitamin C include citrus fruits and juices, peppers, broccoli, tomatoes, melons and strawberries. These also help increase iron absorption. If you are concerned about getting enough vitamins and minerals from food, ask your doctor whether multivitamins might help.


What red blood cells do

Your body makes three types of blood cells white blood cells to fight infection, platelets to help your blood clot and red blood cells to carry oxygen throughout your body. Red blood cells contain hemoglobin, an iron - rich protein that gives blood its red color. Hemoglobin enables red blood cells to carry oxygen from your lungs to all parts of your body and to carry carbon dioxide from other parts of the body to your lungs to exhale. Most blood cells, including red blood cells, are produced regularly in your bone marrow, spongy material found within the cavities of many of your large bones. To produce hemoglobin and red blood cells, your body needs iron, vitamin B - 12, folate and other nutrients from foods you eat.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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