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Inukjuak (Inuit reserved land)

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Last Updated: 12 November 2020

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Inukjuak (Inuit reserved land)

Area
Land428.39 km 2 (165.40 sq mi)
Total479.40 km 2 (185.10 sq mi)
ConstitutedMay 2, 1995
CountryCanada
Government
Federal ridingAbitibiBaie-JamesNunavikEeyou
Prov. ridingUngava
Population (2011)
Change (2006-11)N/A
Density0.0/km 2 (0/sq mi)
Dwellings0
Summer ( DST )UTC4 ( EDT )
Time zoneUTC5 ( EST )
Total0
ProvinceQuebec
RegionNord-du-Quebec
TEKativik

INUKJUAK, Quebec, womans moans of pain mingle with the intermittent beeping of fetal heartbeat monitor. Her midwife gently coached her in their mother tongue, Inuktitut, as the morning sun cast cool light across the floor. Finally, babys wail break through. His shrill cry was a reminder of why Inuit midwives have reclaimed the right of pregnant women to choose to give birth in their hometown after years of being pressured to travel south to have their babies. As Canada tries to make amends for its brutal history of relations with its Indigenous population, midwives and other members of the community in INUKJUAK, town of around 1 800 people in a remote region of Quebec, point to the clinic as an example of a way forward. Today, around three out of four pregnant women in town give birth in its clinic, attended to by Inuit midwives. Reconciling with Indigenous populations is one of the most pressing issues facing Canada these days. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has called it a priority of his government. History curriculums have been revamped in schools; public meetings routinely begin with recognition of Indigenous lands they are held on; and buildings have been rename. To many here, INUKJUAK clinic is a tangible example of what is possible. FOR countless generations, Inuit of Nunavik region in Northern Quebec lived as nomads, traveling across wind-battered landscape to follow herds they hunt seasonally. But in the 1950s, Canadian government pressured families to settle in permanent communities. Move fits squarely into the pattern of how Canada treats its Indigenous people, including forcibly separating Indigenous children from their families and sending them often great distances to residential schools that strip them of their language and cultural identity. The stated reason FOR practice, which began in the early 1970s, was to improve birth survival rates and reduce complications in far-flung communities with no hospitals and limited prenatal care. But for many Indigenous women, policy turns pregnancy into an illness, and deprives them of care through traditional methods. Many also find the experience of being sent from home isolating, and sometimes traumatizing. Because they leave their communities well before their due dates, they spend weeks away from their families to give birth in unfamiliar surroundings, tended by doctors and nurses who do speak their first language. In 1986, local elders who wanted to bring birth back to Nunavik persuaded hospital in the region to begin a training program to certify Inuit women as midwives. Eventually, three maternity clinics lead by Inuit women were set up in villages on the Hudson Bay coast. In winter, rocky rolling hills are buried by snow. They come alive in summer, covered by green FOR a few precious weeks as daylight stretches well into night. It keeps coming back, mayor of INUKJUAK, Simeonie Nalukturuk, say of grass, wildflowers and berries that seem to disappear FOR good in winter.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

INAC's role

Britain granted the vast Canadian Arctic to Hudson's Bay Company in 1670, but the first recorded contact between modern European explorers and Inuit did not occur until the nineteenth century. Explorers bring back reports of seemingly primitive and inferior people with none of the advantages of European civilization. Some explorers pay dearly for their mistaken perception when they were shipwreck and refuse to accept the idea that Inuits could help them. At the time of first contacts, Inuit people had developed sophisticated technology for surviving in a harsh environment that provided them with a rich and secure economy. Inhabiting the entire North from the coast of Alaska to Labrador, they live in groups of families in temporary camps, moving according to seasons and availability of game. Travel was by skin boat, dog team or on foot. They were mostly maritime people, depending for food and clothing on Marine mammals-bowhead whale, beluga, narwhal, walrus and seal-although Caribou and fish were also important. A small group of people known as Caribou Inuit live in the Keewatin Region in central Canadian Arctic, dependent on food, clothing and summer shelter on Caribou and have no sea animals. Inuit were hard-hit by initial contact with Europeans, particularly American and Scottish whalers, who decimated this vital element of Inuit survival in a few short decades starting in the 1850s. Ironically, Europeans make extensive use of Inuit knowledge of water and of whales in order to make their catches, pressing local Inuit into service on their ships. The whaling industry also brings with it diseases and alcohol, which have enormous impacts on Inuit. By 1910, number of Inuit in the Mackenzie River Delta in western Canadian Arctic had fallen from 2 000 to about 130. In 1870, Hudson's Bay Company sold land of Inuit to the Canadian government, which renamed it the Northwest Territories and parcelled it out to existing provinces. All this was done without any consultation with Inuit people, much less their consent. In 1912, again without consulting local Inuit, federal government extended the boundary of the province of Quebec northward to include Ungava' district. At this time, Arctic holds no intrinsic value for the Canadian government. But as other countries, especially the United States, became interested in the area in the late 1800s, Canada was forced to establish its sovereignty. Between 1953 and 1955, Canada forcibly relocated 92 Inuit from the Northern Quebec village of Inukjuak to the High Arctic in a bid to assert its sovereignty over the area. They endure hunger and cold, and were not warned about long months of darkness that await them. They were also not provided with warm clothing. In 1994, federally appointed Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples called the move paternalistic' and illegal' because it was financed with money intended for Inuit economic development.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Awareness and healing

PUVIRNITUQ, QC, July 13 2020 / CNW /-In recent months, daily lives of not-for-profit and non-governmental organizations, including organizations in northern communities, have been particularly shaken by the COVID-19 pandemic, which adds further pressure on their already limited and valuable resources. The government of Canada is committed to continuing to support them in their mission and initiatives, including Commemoration, to the best of its ability. Commemoration is a powerful way to honour truths, support healing, create awareness, and advance reconciliation. We cannot fully address systemic causes of violence against Indigenous women, girls and LGBTQ and Two-Spirit people without acknowledging the past. That's why the government of Canada created a Commemoration Fund which invests over 13 million in over 100 Commemoration initiatives from coast to coast to coast to help honour the lives and legacies of missing and murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, including LGTBQ and Two-Spirit people. As part of this investment, Honourable Pablo Rodriguez, Quebec Lieutenant and Leader of Government in the House of Commons, on behalf of Honourable Maryam Monsef, Canada's Minister for Women and Gender Equality and Rural Economic Development, announced today that the Government of Canada is providing 100 000 in support of Inuulitsivik Health Centre's on Land Workshops-Commemoration events in communities of PUVIRNITUQ and Inukjuak, Quebec, and for Commission of Commemoration Sculpture. This project will help honour the lives and legacies of missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls and LGBTQ and Two-Spirit people, and increase awareness about this ongoing National tragedy. This responds to the National Inquiry into Missing and murder Indigenous Women and Girls' Interim Report, issued in November 2017, and stems from the Call for Proposals launched by Minister Monsef under the Commemoration Fund in February 2019. The National Inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous Women and Girls will submit its Final Report on June 3rd 2019. The government of Canada is working to end this National tragedy with Indigenous, provincial and territorial partners. We are continuing to co-develop National Action Plan and to recognize and honour missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, and LGBTQ and Two-Spirit people, and support healing of families, survivors and First Nations, Inuit and Metis communities. The National Inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous Women and Girls was a step forward and not the end. We cannot move forward and eliminate Gender-base Violence without first acknowledging the past. That is why supporting commemorative projects across Canada, such as Inuulitsivik Health Centre's on Land Workshops-Commemoration events and sculptures, is so important to help honour those who are missing and those whose lives have been tragically lose. Honourable Maryam Monsef, PC, MP Minister for Women and Gender Equality and Rural Economic Development Inuulitsivik Health Centre's Commemoration initiatives are making a concrete contribution to the Government of Canada's efforts to raise awareness of this national tragedy and to put an end to it. Funding for this project is making a real difference in the lives of people of Nunavik, but also of the entire province.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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