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Japanese Music Industry Executives

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Last Updated: 01 December 2020

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TOKYO-On chilly evening last month, tens of thousands of people gathered at Saitama Super Arena near TOKYO, one of Japan's biggest Live MUSIC venues. People of all ages were thrilled to witness rock legends in action: Ireland's U2. The band was in the midst of a world tour taking in Seoul, Manila, Mumbai and other major cities in the Asia-Pacific region. For Japanese U2 fans, visit was special, as it was their first time performing in the country in 13 years. Among the crowd was 32-year-old Yuki Hayashi, who goes to at least 10 live shows a year. I feel happy to be in the same place where my favorite artists are, he add, saying that he has already booked ticket for another concert in a few months' time. Hayashi is not alone. Despite plummeting CD sales, Japan's MUSIC Industry is turning the Live MUSIC experience into a major new pillar of growth. According to the All Japan Concert and Live Entertainment Promoters Conference organization, total audience attendance for all concerts reached 48 million in 2018, up 25% from 2013, and generating 345 billion yen in sales, 49% increase from five years earlier. The number of performances has also increased 43% over the same time period. Hiromichi Hayashi, CEO of Hayashi International Promotion, Japan's leading concert promoter, says that concerts and merchandise are becoming increasingly important as revenue stream for artists. Many artists know that show business is not forever. When you can't make money from CDs, you have to sell tickets and merchandise to instantly cash in, says Hayashi. Ticket prices for live shows are also increasing. According to ACPC Data, average ticket price was 4 771 yen in 2008. It increased to 7 092 yen in 2018-up 49% in decade. It is simply a matter of supply and demand, say John Boyle, President of Live Nation Japan, Japanese subsidiary of American Concert promoter Live Nation, which put on U2 Concert in Saitama. Every venue is full every single night. Confident that there is much more room for Japan's Live MUSIC market to grow, Boyle says the real problem facing tour promoters in Japan is the shortage of venues. We will see significant growth after the 2020 Olympics, said Boyle. Live Nation Japan is part of the consortium managing the newly built Ariake Arena, which will be the volleyball venue for TOKYO 2020 Olympic Games and then convert to an entertainment venue later. In five years, the market could grow another 25%, he say. On top of succeeding in concert business, there are other signs that Japan's MUSIC market-world's second-largest-is growing again after years of contraction. According to the Recording Industry Association of Japan, domestic MUSIC market expanded for first time in three years to 304. 8 billion yen in 2018, up 5% from the previous year. An important growth driver is streaming.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

4. Retail

Idols are a big reason for Japans enduring attachment to CDs and stores that sell them. But perhaps the biggest cause is its aging population. Among the most popular artists of 2016 are Arashi, boy band in its 17 years of existence, and 47-year-old artist Masaharu Fukuyama. Fans of these bands tend to be older and have more money to spend, and they buy music by artists they grew up with. That trend in many countries, Mulligan say, but the Japans population is exceptionally old, and so that where its spending power and consumer demand are concentratednot, among teenagers or young adults who are more comfortable with digital downloads and streaming services. Still, over the last few years, even Japan's Music Industry has been moving towards digital. Japan's consumer behavior is finally changing, with a surge of interest in online shopping; online retailers made sales worth nearly $90 billion in 2015, compared to $33 billion in 2009. Just like Darwins finches in Galapagos, when introduced to a new ecosystem, Japan consumers will start adapting to it. Convenience of digital music will sooner or later trump love of physical objects. And, yet, whenever that happen, Japan's history shows that it will probably happen in its own unique way.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

8. Media, print and online

Blockbuster Video may be a thing of the past in the West, but rental services are still hugely popular in Japan, and alongside DVDs, they also lend music. Rental services are, of course, gateway to piracy, since it is easy to rent a CD and copy it onto blank discs. And, yet, after initial legal skirmishes with rental companies, Japanese Music Industry reached compromise in the early 1980s. It introduce license fee, paid by rental companies each year, which claw back some of the revenue lost to piracy. That revenue has dropped over the last two decades, as the popularity of rentals has decline. In 2014, rentals brought in 2. 9 billion to the Music Industry, barely more than 1% of total revenue. That say, there are still more than 2 400 rental stores in Japan. Industry, however, doesnt mind rentals and associate piracy risk, because renting trains consumers want physical copies. It also offers more opportunities for retail sales; whole floors of rental stores are often dedicated to selling new CDs. Even in small towns, theres still a convenient place to browse physical media and be exposed to music industry advertising. And according to Mark Mulligan, global Music analyst, people who rent could be ready-make customer base for streaming services in future.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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