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Kids Sight Words

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Last Updated: 02 July 2021

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Sight Words app series is the 2012 nominee for the Distinguished Achievement Award presented by the Association of Educational Publishers. Give your child building blocks he needs to learn to read. Combine fun, easy - to - follow activities with hands - on and audio features to jumpstart learning process. Create by reading experts such as Dr. Fry, Kids Learn Sight Words Use developmentally appropriate approaches to let children hear words, practice writing words, recognize letters, record words with playback use words in activities. It combines fluency, vocabulary, spelling, and comprehension practice with entertaining, engaging graphics in disguised - Learning format. Children will want to play again and again and, by doing so, will be learning up to 300 all - important Sight Words. Great for young learners and older children struggling with reading. This app includes Words 1 - 25 for free with an option to purchase additional Word packs. Each set of words comes with planned related activities. Activities change and progress as the child moves along: Word Jigsaw Puzzle Touch Puzzle piece To hear Word. Look For Word in the Puzzle outline. Then move the Puzzle piece onto the correct place on the Puzzle outline. Repeat this process until the entire puzzle is put together. Word Jigsaw Puzzles are random and different each time; Play as much as you like. Word Tic Tac Toe Tap on picture of ear to hear Word. Click on that word on the Tic Tac Toe grid. Next, computers take turn. Keep playing on the computer until one of you has three in a row. The computer will also automatically say the next word to you. Tic Tac Toe games are random and different each time; Play as much as you like. Word Matching Game Touch one card to turn it over. Touch another card to find one that matches the first card. Keep turning over cards until you have match all pairs. Matching games are random and different each time; Play as much as you like. Hangman Look at blank lines at the bottom of the screen. Tap letter in alphabet. If you have correctly guess letter in word, letter will appear blank. If not, body part will be added to the person. You have ten tries to correctly spell word. Hang man Uses Words You just Learn, as you learn five words at a time. Word Chain uses Word tile to make your own sentences. Be sure to use at least one word on top of the screen in each sentence you make. Then Touch Star to have your sentence read to you. Shake to erase and reset words. Star Speller Touch Star To hear Word. Touch the letter in Word that you heard, and drag the letter into one of the blank boxes. Keep dragging letters into blank boxes until you have spelt word.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Why Phonics?

(Numbers in parentheses are the Dolch Frequency Ranking)

CVC"A" Spells Schwa in First SyllableShort Vowels and r-Controlled VowelsShort Vowel and Long VowelAll Other Two-Syllable WordsThree-Syllable Word
seven (134)about (84)after (108)myself (139)little (39)every (96)
upon (211)around (85)never (133)open (165)over (73)
away (101)better (172)funny (175)going (115)
under (196)yellow 118)
before (124)

In order to implement the new phonics - base model for teaching high - frequency words, teachers will need to fit high - frequency words into phonics instruction. To do this, generally committee of three or four kindergarten and first grade teachers organizes their lists of high - frequency words according to Heart Words and Flash Words by spelling patterns. Next, they determine when and how high - frequency words fit into phonics scope and sequence. These same teachers provide professional development to show other teachers how to implement new model. Sometimes, coordinated effort to change the way high - frequency words are taught is not an option, and teachers are able to only partially implement suggestions in this article. These teachers continue to introduce words as determined by their curriculum. However, they tell students whether sight Word is Flash Word or heart Word, and they introduce words by teaching letter - sound relationships as outlined in this article. Further, teachers introduce words with similar spelling patterns whenever possible. For example, if only a word is scheduled to be introduce, they also teach could and should, which fit the spelling pattern. Finally, these teachers do not hold students accountable for high frequency words that are beyond spelling patterns that have been taught in phonics lessons. The new model allows a different approach for working with students who have difficulty learning high - frequency words. For example, students working on short vowel patterns may confuse her and here, which are often introduced early as part of sight Word List. A teacher who recognizes the source of this confusion would not expect students to continue trying to memorize two words. Instead, teacher would include her as part of instruction on r - control vowels and include here when silent e is teach. Students will be less likely to misread or misspell these words when they understand the relation between spelling er to sound / er / and spelling ere to sound / er /. Traditionally, students would continue struggling with and failing to memorize these easily confused words. With the new model, those students are not held accountable for accurately reading and spelling words until they can understand and use sound - spelling correspondences All teachers using this approach say that students learn to spell and read words much more easily than with the traditional approach.


Flash Words and Heart Words defined

For instructional purposes, High - Frequency Words can be divided into two categories: those that are phonetically decodable and those with irregular spellings. We call High - Frequency Words that are regularly spelt and thus decodable Flash Words. Although their spelling patterns are easily decode, Flash words are used so frequently in reading and writing that students need to be able to read and spell them in Flash. Examples of Flash Words at cvc level are can, not, and do. Irregularly spelled words are called Heart Words because some part of word will have to be learnt by heart. Heart Words are also used so frequently that they need to be read and spelt automatically. Examples of Heart Words are: say, are, and where. Words on any High - Frequency Word List can easily be categorized into Flash Words and Heart Words. However, be caution that words may change categories. For example, early in phonics scope and sequence, see may be Heart Word because long E spelling patterns have been teach. When students learn that ee spells long E, see becomes Flash Word. Further, many of Heart Words can be categorized into words with similar spellings. This article categorizes Words on the Dolch List of 220 High Frequency Words 1. The method we use to categorize words on the Dolch 220 List works with any High - Frequency Word List.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

Table 1: 10 Sight Words for Pre-Readers to Learn

WordDolch Frequency RankFry Frequency Rank
the11
a54
I620
to25
and33
was1112
for1613
you78
is227
of92

(Numbers in parentheses are the Dolch frequency ranking)

VCCVCDigraphsBlendsWords Ending in NG and N
(Sorted by vowel spelling)(Sorted by vowel spelling)(Sorted by digraph)(Sorted by ending blends, then beginning blends)(Sorted by ending letters)
at (21)had (20) hot (203)that (14)and (3)sing (213)
am (37)can (42) but (19)with (23)just (78)bring (155)
an (72)ran (111) run (163)then (38)must (149)long (167)
it (8)him (22) cut (188)them (52)fast (182)thank (216)
in (10)did (45) get (51)this (55)best (210)think (110)
if (65)will (59) yes (60)much (142)went (62)drink (159)
on (17)big (61) red (80)pick (185)ask (70)
off (132)six (120) well (109)wish (217)its (75)
up (24)sit (191) let (112)when (44)jump (98)
us (169)not (49) tell (141)which (192)help (113)
got (93) ten (153)stop (131)
black (151)

Table

Unusual Spelling PatternHigh-Frequency Words
s at the end of the word spells /z/his (13), is (27), as (32), has (166)
v is followed by e because no English word ends in vhave (34), give (144), live (206)
o-e spells short u /u/some (30), come (64), done (180)
o spells /oo/ (as in boot)to (2), do (41), into (77)
rhyming words spelled with the same last four lettersthere (29), where (95)
s spells /z/ in a vce wordthose (179), these (212)
all spells /oll/all (25), call (167), fall (193), small (195), ball
oul spells /oo/ (as in cook)could (43), would (57), should
e at the end is after a phonetic r-controlled spellingwere (50), are (63)
vcc and cvcc words with o spelling long o /o/old (102), cold (136), hold (173), both (190)
cvcc words with i spelling long i /i/find (167), kind (189), mind
words similar in meaning and spellingone (54), once (160)
a after w sometimes spells short o /o/want (86), wash (201), watch
ue spells /oo/ as in bootblue (79), glue , clue , true
u spells /oo/ (as in cook)put (91), full (178), pull (187), push
rhyming words with silent lwalk (121), talk
rhyming words - the letter a spells short i or short e (depending on dialect)any (83), many (218)
oo at the end of a word spells /oo/ (as in boot)too (92), boo , moo
or spells /er/work (145), word , world
uy spells long i /i/buy (174), guy
* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Why Sight Words?

(Numbers in parentheses are the Dolch frequency ranking)

VCCVCDigraphsBlendsWords Ending in NG and N
(Sorted by vowel spelling)(Sorted by vowel spelling)(Sorted by digraph)(Sorted by ending blends, then beginning blends)(Sorted by ending letters)
at (21)had (20) hot (203)that (14)and (3)sing (213)
am (37)can (42) but (19)with (23)just (78)bring (155)
an (72)ran (111) run (163)then (38)must (149)long (167)
it (8)him (22) cut (188)them (52)fast (182)thank (216)
in (10)did (45) get (51)this (55)best (210)think (110)
if (65)will (59) yes (60)much (142)went (62)drink (159)
on (17)big (61) red (80)pick (185)ask (70)
off (132)six (120) well (109)wish (217)its (75)
up (24)sit (191) let (112)when (44)jump (98)
us (169)not (49) tell (141)which (192)help (113)
got (93) ten (153)stop (131)
black (151)

First, let's define what sight words are. Sight Words are defined by your child. His sight words are words that he can already recognize by sight without using any specific strategies. That's not usually how the term is used though. Just to confuse you, when you see lists of sight words, what you are usually seeing are lists of high frequency words or Dolch words. Edward William Dolch first compiled a full list and broke it down into five levels for children to learn by sight. They are list of 220 words that are used so often in print that together they make up an estimated 75% of all words used in books. Some words cannot be decoded using conventional strategies, so memorizing them until they are known by sight is beneficial. You might think that these words are so common that kids would just learn them organically through reading and other everyday print. But many words also defy standard phonetic conventions, meaning they are impossible to sound out. They are also often difficult to illustrate, so children can't use illustrations in picture books to make deeper connection to these words. Can you illustrate is or it? Me neither. On the flip side, wonderful thing about these words being so common is that children learn them easily with repetition because they are usually words that they already have in their everyday vocabulary. Working hard to learn these words by sight pays off. It allows kids to free up cognitive resources so they can focus on tougher words that require strong decoding skills. They are also able to understand the majority of text if those decoding skills fail. There is more to why sight words are important than just simply mechanics of reading; they are also fantastic confidence boosters. One of my educational philosophies is to build children's confidence and then present attainable challenge. Sight - word knowledge provides a scaffold of understanding and confidence for new readers who need to use all the other tools in their tool box to complete the job AT hand: reading with understanding. So now that we know what they are, why they are important, and what they can do, we need to figure out how parents can help. Of all the various reading strategies, I find working on sight words to be the easiest for parents to get involved in. If you aren't sure which words to work on with your children, you can check with their classroom teacher or find Dolch word list here. Using these lists, try out some of these simple sight - word activities AT home. You can find many different commercial sight - word bingo games, or you can make your own. Here is a simple post from teachmama. Com that shows you how. Write sight words on index cards, and hide them around the house. Set the timer and give your child two minutes to find as many sight words as he can.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

Table

Unusual Spelling PatternHigh-Frequency Words
s at the end of the word spells /z/his (13), is (27), as (32), has (166)
v is followed by e because no English word ends in vhave (34), give (144), live (206)
o-e spells short u /u/some (30), come (64), done (180)
o spells /oo/ (as in boot)to (2), do (41), into (77)
rhyming words spelled with the same last four lettersthere (29), where (95)
s spells /z/ in a vce wordthose (179), these (212)
all spells /oll/all (25), call (167), fall (193), small (195), ball
oul spells /oo/ (as in cook)could (43), would (57), should
e at the end is after a phonetic r-controlled spellingwere (50), are (63)
vcc and cvcc words with o spelling long o /o/old (102), cold (136), hold (173), both (190)
cvcc words with i spelling long i /i/find (167), kind (189), mind
words similar in meaning and spellingone (54), once (160)
a after w sometimes spells short o /o/want (86), wash (201), watch
ue spells /oo/ as in bootblue (79), glue , clue , true
u spells /oo/ (as in cook)put (91), full (178), pull (187), push
rhyming words with silent lwalk (121), talk
rhyming words - the letter a spells short i or short e (depending on dialect)any (83), many (218)
oo at the end of a word spells /oo/ (as in boot)too (92), boo , moo
or spells /er/work (145), word , world
uy spells long i /i/buy (174), guy

(Numbers in parentheses are the Dolch Frequency Ranking)

the (1)very (71)here (105)does (154)use (181)
a (5)yours (74)two (122)goes (156)carry (194)
of (9)from (81)again (126)write (157)because (204)
you (7)dont (87)who (128)always (158)together (214)
was (11)know (89)been (129)only (168)please (215)
said (12)pretty (97)eight (135)our (171)shall (219)
they (18)four (100)today (137)warm (176)laugh (220)
what (46)their (104)
* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sight word reading practice activities

(Numbers in parentheses are the Dolch frequency ranking)

VCCVCDigraphsBlendsWords Ending in NG and N
(Sorted by vowel spelling)(Sorted by vowel spelling)(Sorted by digraph)(Sorted by ending blends, then beginning blends)(Sorted by ending letters)
at (21)had (20) hot (203)that (14)and (3)sing (213)
am (37)can (42) but (19)with (23)just (78)bring (155)
an (72)ran (111) run (163)then (38)must (149)long (167)
it (8)him (22) cut (188)them (52)fast (182)thank (216)
in (10)did (45) get (51)this (55)best (210)think (110)
if (65)will (59) yes (60)much (142)went (62)drink (159)
on (17)big (61) red (80)pick (185)ask (70)
off (132)six (120) well (109)wish (217)its (75)
up (24)sit (191) let (112)when (44)jump (98)
us (169)not (49) tell (141)which (192)help (113)
got (93) ten (153)stop (131)
black (151)

Learning letter sounds, how to blend and segment words, and various Phonics skills are foundational for Early Reading. However, there are just some words that can't be sounded out. Sight Words are commonly used words that young readers are taught to memorize. Since these words are used at high frequency, students are encouraged to recognize them by sight. Hand - on Sight Word Activities Merge students ' kinesthetic Learning With visual Learning. Background about Learning Sight Words Learning to Read is complicated and intricate. While learning to read Sight Words is only one component of reading development, it is a necessary and important component. What Are Sight Words? Words like, of, you, was are all words that need to be memorized and recognized by sight. They cannot be decoded using general Phonics patterns. Some words that we consider Sight Words are Decodable Words, but occur frequently. These are often called high frequency words, although I have found that sight words and high frequency words are terms that are used interchangeably. Words like, and, that, as, on, in are all Decodable Words, but are also often taught as Sight Words. Which words should you consider Sight Words? Well, there's couple of different answers. If your school district is assessing a list of words, consider that your list. If your school or district is not providing List Words, you can find various lists online, including Dolch Lists and Fry's Lists. While Dolch and Fry's are some of the more common lists, each reading program seems to develop its own list. Most lists are very similar. Since it takes students so long to learn Sight Words, you might consider limiting Sight Word instruction to words that are common and irregular or not Decodable. If you are teaching Phonics - base Reading program alongside teaching students to memorize Sight Words, then they will learn how to decode and, had, last, then, With, not, much, etc. As they progress through reading program. Don't waste valuable time on teaching students to memorize Decodable Words if you don't have to. How Do Students Learn Sight Words? There are a variety of ways for students to learn Sight Words. Frequent exposure is key. You can do a Read - spell - Read routine whole class and in small groups. Parents can also easily learn to do this routine at home with flash cards. All Students will also benefit from Using More Hands - on Sight Word Activities during your Word Work stations. 5 Hands - on Sight Word Activities For Kindergarten Here Are 5 Sight Word Activities For kindergarteners that help young learners remember high - frequency words while having fun! 1. Block Building Game Turn classic block building games like Jenga, into a way for students to learn their Sight Words. Start by writing a high - frequency word on each block. Playing normal Jenga rules, where player removes a block from tower and places it on top, have student who remove block successfully use Sight Word in sentence before the next player takes their turn.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

Table

Unusual Spelling PatternHigh-Frequency Words
s at the end of the word spells /z/his (13), is (27), as (32), has (166)
v is followed by e because no English word ends in vhave (34), give (144), live (206)
o-e spells short u /u/some (30), come (64), done (180)
o spells /oo/ (as in boot)to (2), do (41), into (77)
rhyming words spelled with the same last four lettersthere (29), where (95)
s spells /z/ in a vce wordthose (179), these (212)
all spells /oll/all (25), call (167), fall (193), small (195), ball
oul spells /oo/ (as in cook)could (43), would (57), should
e at the end is after a phonetic r-controlled spellingwere (50), are (63)
vcc and cvcc words with o spelling long o /o/old (102), cold (136), hold (173), both (190)
cvcc words with i spelling long i /i/find (167), kind (189), mind
words similar in meaning and spellingone (54), once (160)
a after w sometimes spells short o /o/want (86), wash (201), watch
ue spells /oo/ as in bootblue (79), glue , clue , true
u spells /oo/ (as in cook)put (91), full (178), pull (187), push
rhyming words with silent lwalk (121), talk
rhyming words - the letter a spells short i or short e (depending on dialect)any (83), many (218)
oo at the end of a word spells /oo/ (as in boot)too (92), boo , moo
or spells /er/work (145), word , world
uy spells long i /i/buy (174), guy

(Numbers in parentheses are the Dolch Frequency Ranking)

the (1)very (71)here (105)does (154)use (181)
a (5)yours (74)two (122)goes (156)carry (194)
of (9)from (81)again (126)write (157)because (204)
you (7)dont (87)who (128)always (158)together (214)
was (11)know (89)been (129)only (168)please (215)
said (12)pretty (97)eight (135)our (171)shall (219)
they (18)four (100)today (137)warm (176)laugh (220)
what (46)their (104)
* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

SIGHT WORDS TO TRACE

Tracing kindergarten sight words gives children the chance to engage with words in new and different way. By combining multiple learning styles in one lesson, kids are more likely to learn and recall their sight words. Here are a couple of methods for creating kindergarten sight words to trace. Rainbow Writing: At the beginning of the school year, students trace sight words in three different colors. This repetition helps them develop motor memory while also solidifying the spelling of word. As the school year progresses, students write words on their own in three colors. They can overlap colors or write them three separate times. Dry Erase Words: Kids love writing with different writing tools, so dry erase markers always make things more fun! - Print out kindergarten sight words that youd like students to practice on a sheet of heavy cardstock. - Slip cardstock into a transparent page protector and clip it to clipboard. - Then, with a dry Erase marker, students can trace sight words on page protector. If they make a mistake, it can be Erase with tissue or old sock!

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

KINDERGARTEN SIGHT WORDS WITH PICTURES

Kindergarten sight words are basic words that are seen most frequently in grade - level books. Many of words are hard to illustrate, because of their simplicity. One way to create flashcards of kindergarten sight words with pictures is to have students decorate them or come up with illustrations that help them remember word. For example, they may draw someone crawling UNDER table, or they might draw a picture of a toy that has fallen UNDER bed to illustrate the word UNDER. Whatever image helps them remember word is fine to use. The goal is to help them learn words, so there is no right or wrong.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

KINDERGARTEN SIGHT WORD FLASHCARDS

Sight words are words that are short and easy enough for your child to recognize and read without having to sound them out. Sight words also make up 50 - 70% of sentences we use all the time. So, learning how to read sight words can immediately build confidence when your child starts reading emergent readers. Sight words help build the foundation for more challenging, complex words. To use these flashcards, print them out on white card stock on your home computer. Make sure that your printer is set to full bleed and that it doesnt shrink down pages or alignment may be off. Trim down following trim guides. If you prefer, you can laminate them for extra sturdiness. Sit in a distraction - free area and show your child flashcards. Model word. Have your child repeat words back to you. If your child loses focus, redirect them to looking at card. Also, if your child is struggles with enunciation of words, hold card up to your mouth so they can see how you are making sounds with your lips. If your child begins to become frustrated or very disinterested, stop and resume another day. Young children have short attention spans and you do want this to be an awful experience. For best results, do this daily. When you feel your child is ready, challenge your child to read words by himself or herself. If he or she is incorrect, I suggest not telling them they are wrong as this can crush budding confidence. Instead, keep it positive. Simply model word correctly by saying, word is then tell them they do well for trying. Always boost your childs confidence whenever you can.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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