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Levaquin Pneumonia

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Last Updated: 24 September 2020

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General | Latest Info

The emergence of Streptococcus pneumoniae that is resistant to - lactam and macrolide antimicrobial drugs has aroused concern about use of these agents for empirical treatment of community - acquired pneumonia. 1 Fluoroquinolones with increased activity against S. Pneumoniae, such as levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, and gatifloxacin, are now being recommended for treatment of patients with community - acquire pneumonia whose infection is likely to have been caused by multidrug - resistant strains. 1 - 6 However, there has been relatively little experience with use of these agents, as compared with - lactam and macrolide antimicrobial agents, as monotherapy for community - acquire pneumonia. We describe four patients with pneumococcal pneumonia in whom empirical treatment with oral levofloxacin fail. In all four cases, organism that either was resistant to levofloxacin before therapy or acquired resistance during therapy was isolate. In light of these failures, we investigated use of antimicrobial agents according to prescription records and determined the frequency of routine testing for pneumococcal susceptibility to levofloxacin in clinical laboratories in Ontario. Each of two isolates from Patients 1, 2, and 3 had the same pattern on pulsed - field gel electrophoresis and the same serotype, but the pattern and serotype of isolates differed among patients. Results of DNA sequencing of fluoroquinolone - resistance - determining region of parC and gyrA genes are shown in Table 1. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin and erythromycin. Active efflux does not contribute to reducing fluoroquinolone susceptibility observed in any of the isolates. According to results of the Quality Management Program - Laboratory Services survey, all 109 laboratories correctly identified the challenge organism as S. Pneumoniae. However, only 15 of these laboratories perform level - susceptibility testing. Levofloxacin was approved for use in Canada in the fall of 1997. In 1998, 51 908 prescriptions for oral levofloxacin were written for adults; in 1999, this number increased to 161 277, and in 2000 it increased to 316 467. In 2000 1. 3 levofloxacin prescriptions per 100 persons were write, as compared with 14. 7 prescriptions for macrolides per 100 persons and 6. 2 prescriptions for amoxicillin - clavulanate or second - generation cephalosporins per 100 persons. In treatment of pneumococcal pneumonia with with - lactam, tetracycline, and macrolide antimicrobial drugs, pneumococcal resistance usually results from acquisition of resistance gene before therapy. However, reduced susceptibility or resistance to Fluoroquinolones may develop during therapy. Such change could adversely affect the pharmacodynamics of Drug.S As the prevalence of resistant pneumococci increases, so does the likelihood that treatment will fail if susceptibility testing is not perform. In our opinion, current data indicate that recent exposure to fluoroquinolone should be contraindication to use of another fluoroquinolone for empirical treatment of community - acquired pneumonia. Finally, other risk factors for infection with resistant strain may need to be taken into consideration before one of these agents is prescribe. 10 decreased susceptibility to Fluoroquinolones develops primarily as result of mutations in parC and gyrA genes, which encode targets of Fluoroquinolones, topoisomerase enzymes.

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Reviews for Levaquin

Levaquin is the second most popular drug in the class. From 2004 to 2010, Americans received about 88. 1 million prescriptions for levofloxacin, according to the FDA Office of Surveillance and Epidemiology. It is a third - generation fluoroquinolone. Fda originally approved the drug in 1996. In 2010, it was the best - selling antibiotic in the United States, according to the New York Times. Like Cipro, it treats respiratory and urinary tract infections. It also treats other conditions, including plague, anthrax, bronchitis and pneumonia. Janssen Pharmaceuticals stopped making Levaquin, according to FDA, though the agency does not specify why the drugmaker discontinued it. Although company discontinue all versions of brand - name drug in December 2017, it may still be available in pharmacies until 2020, according to news outlet RTV6 in Indianapolis. The decision to discontinue Levaquin was made due to the wide availability of alternative treatment options, and our focus on developing innovative medicines designed to address unmet medical patient needs, Kelsey Buckholtz, spokeswoman for Janssen, told RTV6.

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Methodology of Systematic Review

In Double blind randomized controlled trials, does levofloxacin provide significant therapeutic advantage in terms of mortality or morbidity when compared to other fluoroquinolones or other classes of antibacterial agents in treatment of adult patients with community acquired pneumonia? Assessment principles: Double blind randomized controlled trials comparing levofloxacin to other fluoroquinolones or other classes of antibacterial agents in adult patients with community - acquired pneumonia were critically appraise. Therapeutic impact was assessed according to the following hierarchy of health outcomes - mortality, non fatal serious adverse events, quality of life, withdrawals due to adverse events, clinical response, microbiological response, and other adverse events. Search strategy: Database search: Medline, EMBASE and Cochrane Library; manufacturers ' submission, and references of review articles. Key search words include: levofloxacin, or Levaquin, randomized control trial, and pneumonia. Search Findings: Four DB RCTs meet inclusion criteria, comparing levofloxacin to moxifloxacin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, or amoxicillin / clavulanic acid. 5 - 8 in One DBRCT in 401 patients with community - acquired pneumonia 5, IV levofloxacin 500mg daily for 2 days then oral levofloxacin 250 - 500mg daily after improvement for 7 - 14 days was not significantly different from IV moxifloxacin 400mg, daily for 2 days then oral moxifloxacin 400mg daily, after improvement For 7 - 14 days in terms of mortality, non - fatal serious adverse events, clinical or bacteriological response, total withdrawals and withdrawals due to adverse events. There was significant improvement in the rate of clinical recovery in patients receiving moxifloxacin 3 to 5 days into therapy, but not at test of cure. Total adverse events, reported as treatment - emergent adverse events, were significantly higher with moxifloxacin. 5 based on three DBRCTs in 1067 randomized adult patients with mild to moderate community - acquire pneumonia in which oral levofloxacin 500mg daily for 7 - 10 days was compared to either single 2000mg dose of oral azithromycin microspheres 6, oral clarithromycin, extend release 1000mg daily for 7 days 7, or oral amoxicillin / clavulanic acid 625mg tid daily For 7 - 10 days 8, there were no significant differences between treatment groups in terms of clinical or bacteriological response, and total number of people withdrawing from studies. In addition, DIgnazio et al and Carbon et al do not show significant differences in terms of mortality, non - fatal serious adverse events, and total adverse events, whereas Carbon et al and Gotfried et al do not show significant differences in withdrawals due to adverse events. Dignazio et al does not report withdrawals due to adverse events, while the Gotfried et al trial does not report mortality, non - fatal serious adverse events or total adverse events.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

How is walking pneumonia treated?

Walking Pneumonia is usually mild, does not require hospitalization and is treated with antibiotics. Several types of antibiotics are effective. Antibiotics that are used to treat walking pneumonia caused by M ycoplasma pneumoniae include: Macrolide antibiotics: Macrolide drugs are preferred treatment for children and adults. Macrolides include azithromycin and clarithromycin. Over the past decade, some strains of Mycoplasma pneumoniae have become resistant to Macrolide antibiotics, possibly due to widespread use of azithromycin to treat various illnesses. Fluoroquinolones: These drugs include ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin. Fluoroquinolones are not recommended for young children. Tetracyclines: This group includes doxycycline and tetracycline. They are suitable for adults and older children. Often, over - counter medications can also be taken to help relieve symptoms of nasal congestion, cough and loosen mucus buildup in the chest. If you have a fever: drink more fluids rest Take medicine.


Mycoplasma Infection (walking pneumonia, atypical pneumonia)

Walking pneumonia is a mild form of pneumonia. This non - medical term has become a popular description because you may feel well enough to be walking around, carrying out your daily tasks and not even realize you have pneumonia. Most of the time, walking pneumonia is caused by atypical bacteria called Mycoplasma pneumoniae, which can live and grow in the nose, throat, windpipe and lungs. It can be treated with antibiotics. Scientists call walking pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma atypical because of the unique features of the bacteria itself. Several factors that make it atypical include: milder symptoms Natural resistance to medicines that would normally treat bacterial infections Often mistaken for viruses because they lack the typical cell structure of other bacteria.


What are the symptoms of walking pneumonia?

Symptoms of pneumonia in otherwise healthy people often start during or after upper respiratory infection, such as flu or cold. Symptoms may include: cough, often produces mucus, also called sputum, from lungs. Mucus may be rusty or green or ting with blood. Fever, chills and sweating, which may be less common in older adults. Fast, often shallow, breathing and feeling of being short of breath. Chest wall pain that is often made worse by coughing or breathing in. Fast heartbeat. Feeling very tired or weak. When symptoms are mild, your doctor may call your condition walking pneumonia.

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* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Side Effects

Headache, hunger, sweating, irritability, dizziness, nausea, fast heart rate, feeling anxious or shaky, numbness or tingling in your hands, arms, legs or feet, weakness in your arms, hands, legs or feet, burning pain in your arms, hands, legs or feet, serious mood or behavioral changes, nervousness, confusion, agitation, paranoia, hallucinations, memory problems, trouble concentrating, thoughts Of suicide, Tendon Rupture, sudden pain, swelling, bruising, tenderness, stiffness, movement problems, snapping or popping sound in any Of your joints, severe stomach pain, Diarrhea that is watery or bloody, fluttering in your chest, shortness Of breath, skin Rash, breathing problems, seizures, severe headaches, vision problems, pain behind your eyes, upper stomach pain, loss Of appetite, dark urine, clay - colored stools, and yellowing Of skin or eyes get medical help right away, if you have any Of symptoms list above. Nausea, Constipation, Diarrhea, Headache, Dizziness, and trouble sleeping tell doctor if you have any side effects that bother you or that do not go away. These are not all possible side effects of LEVAQUIN. For more information, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1 - 800 - FDA - 1088.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Interactions

Levofloxacin is a broad - spectrum, third - generation fluoroquinolone antibiotic used to treat bacterial infections. Levofloxacin is a safe and effective medicine on the World Health Organization's essential medicines list. It was patented in 1987 and subsequently received FDA - approval in 1996 for medical use in the United States. Levofloxacin is FDA - approved for Treatment of nosocomial Pneumonia, Community - acquire Pneumonia, acute Bacterial rhinosinusitis, acute Bacterial Exacerbation Of chronic bronchitis, prostatitis, acute pyelonephritis, urinary tract infection, skin or skin structure infections, prophylaxis and Treatment Of Plague due to Yersinia pestis, and to reduce incidence of disease progression Of Inhalational Anthrax. Due to the increased risk of severe side effects, Levofloxacin is used only in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis, acute Bacterial Sinusitis, and uncomplicated urinary tract infections, who do not have alternative treatment options. Ophthalmic Levofloxacin is also used in the treatment of Bacterial conjunctivitis. To decrease development of Drug - Resistant Bacteria, FDA has recommended using Levofloxacin only for strongly suspected bacterial infections. Also, Levofloxacin should not be used empirically in patients at risk of multidrug - Resistant Escherichia coli. Levaquin is indicated in Adult Patients for Treatment Of nosocomial Pneumonia due to methicillin - susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, or Streptococcus pneumoniae. Adjunctive therapy should be used as clinically indicate. Where Pseudomonas aeruginosa is document or presumptive pathogen, combination therapy with anti - pseudomonal - lactam is recommend. Levaquin is indicated in Adult Patients for Treatment Of Community - acquire Pneumonia due to methicillin - susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Moraxella catarrhalis, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, or Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Mdrsp isolates are isolate resistant to two or more of the following antibacterials: penicillin, 2 generation cephalosporins, eg, cefuroxime, macrolides, tetracyclines and trimethoprim / sulfamethoxazole. Levaquin is indicated in Adult Patients for treatment of complicated urinary tract infections due to Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, or Proteus mirabilis. Levaquin is indicated in Adult Patients for treatment of complicated skin and skin structure infections due to methicillin - susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes, or Proteus mirabilis. Levaquin is indicated in Adult Patients for treatment of uncomplicated skin and skin structure infections including abscesses, cellulitis, furuncles, impetigo, pyoderma, wound infections, due to methicillin - susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, or Streptococcus pyogenes. Levaquin is indicated in Adult Patients for Treatment of chronic Bacterial prostatitis due to Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, or methicillin - susceptible Staphylococcus epidermidis. Levaquin is indicated for Inhalational Anthrax to reduce incidence or progression of disease following exposure to aerosolized Bacillus anthracis in adults and pediatric patients, 6 months of age and older. Effectiveness of LEVAQUIN is based on plasma concentrations achieved in humans, surrogate endpoint reasonably likely to predict clinical benefit. Levaquin has not been Test in humans for post - Exposure prevention of inhalation of Anthrax. The Safety of LEVAQUIN in adults for durations of therapy beyond 28 Days or in Pediatric Patients for durations of therapy beyond 14 Days has not been study. Prolonged LEVAQUIN therapy should only be used when benefits outweigh risk.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Patient 1

Patient 2 was a 37 - year - old woman from Nova Scotia who went to the emergency department in the spring of 2000 with a cough and fever. She had no history of treatment with fluoroquinolones. A radiograph of the chest reveals consolidation in the right middle lobe. Sputum specimen show Gram - positive diplococci and growing S. Pneumoniae with susceptibility to Levofloxacin according to the disk - diffusion method. She was treated for Community - acquired Pneumonia with 500 Mg of oral Levofloxacin daily. On third day of treatment, her clinical condition had not improve, and repeated radiography of her chest showed progression of infiltrates. Another sputum specimen contains Gram - positive diplococci and grow S. Pneumoniae, which is now resistant to Levofloxacin.

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* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Adult:

This randomized, double - blind, multicenter study compared the safety and efficacy of nemonoxacin with those of Levofloxacin in Adult Patients with CAP. Eligible Subjects were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups at 1: 11 Ratio to receive once - daily oral nemonoxacin at 750 Mg, nemonoxacin at 500 Mg, or Levofloxacin at 500 Mg for 7 Days. The first dose of study drug was taken under supervision in a clinic. For all subsequent doses, patients took their study drug with water in the morning after an overnight fast of at least 10 H. Subjects were not allowed to eat for 2 H after study drug ADMINISTRATION, but water intake was permit. The primary objective was to demonstrate noninferiority of nemonoxacin versus Levofloxacin with regard to safety and Clinical Efficacy. The study was conducted in compliance with good clinical practice and the Declaration Of Helsinki. The study protocol was approved by institutional review boards of all participating institutions, and all subjects provided write informed consent before enrollment in study. Eligibility criteria. Subjects 18 years of age were eligible for enrollment if they had clinical diagnosis of mild to moderate CAP characterized by fever within previous 24 H and at least one of the following signs and symptoms: chills, shortness of breath, tachypnea, cough, pleuritic chest pain, purulent sputum, crackles in auscultation, rales, rhonchi, egophony, pulmonary consolidation, or dullness to percussion. If fever was absent, subject needs to have presented with two or more of the above - mention clinical signs and symptoms to be eligible. Subjects were also required to have chest radiograph demonstrating new or persistent / progressive infiltrates; radiographs were confirmed by radiologist. Pregnant or lactating subjects were excluded from study. Other exclusion criteria were as follow: history of Hypersensitivity or allergic Reactions to any Quinolone; fluoroquinolone tendinopathy; history of chronic Renal failure or calculated Creatinine Clearance Of Less than 50 mL / min; clinically significant hepatic disease, hematological malignancy, or immunodeficiency, such as neutropenia; history of prolonged electrocardiogram QT correct Interval or requirement for concomitant medication associate with increased QTc Interval; clinically significant conduction or Other abnormality on 12 - lead electrocardiogram at screening or QTc Interval greater than 430 ms in males and greater than 450 ms in females at screening; know or suspect severe bronchiectasis, cystic fibrosis, Active tuberculosis, bronchial obstruction, postobstructive Pneumonia, pulmonary malignancies, lung abscess, or empyema; alcohol or Drug abuse; Treatment with chemotherapeutic Agents or oncolytics during 6 months before randomization or anticipated requirement for such Agents during course Of study; inability to take Drug orally; Treatment with any antibiotic within 7 Days before enrollment in study; and ADMINISTRATION Of any Other investigational Drug within 1 month before randomization. Subjects could be withdrawn from study at any time or if their symptoms worsen or fail to improve after at least 3 Days of Treatment. The Investigator could then switch subject to nonquinolone antibacterial agent if continued CAP therapy was require.

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Warnings/Precautions:

Levaquin is indicated in Adult Patients for Treatment Of Nosocomial Pneumonia due to methicillin - susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, or Streptococcus pneumoniae. Adjunctive therapy should be used as clinically indicate. Where Pseudomonas aeruginosa is document or presumptive pathogen, combination therapy with anti - pseudomonal - lactam is recommend. Levaquin is indicated in Adult Patients for Treatment Of Community - acquire Pneumonia due to methicillin - susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Moraxella catarrhalis, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, or Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Mdrsp isolates are isolate resistant to two or more of the following antibacterials: penicillin, 2 generation cephalosporins, eg, cefuroxime, macrolides, tetracyclines and trimethoprim / sulfamethoxazole. Levaquin is indicated in Adult Patients for Treatment Of Community - acquire Pneumonia due to Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, or Chlamydophila pneumoniae. Levaquin is indicated in Adult Patients for Treatment of complicated Skin and Skin Structure Infections due to methicillin - susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes, or Proteus mirabilis. Levaquin is indicated in Adult Patients for Treatment Of Uncomplicated Skin and Skin Structure Infections including abscesses, cellulitis, furuncles, impetigo, pyoderma, wound Infections, due to methicillin - susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, or Streptococcus pyogenes. Levaquin is indicated in Adult Patients for Treatment Of Chronic Bacterial prostatitis due to Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, or methicillin - susceptible Staphylococcus epidermidis. Levaquin is indicated for Inhalational Anthrax to reduce incidence or progression of disease following exposure to aerosolized Bacillus anthracis in adults and pediatric patients, 6 months of age and older. Effectiveness of LEVAQUIN is based on plasma concentrations achieved in humans, surrogate endpoint reasonably likely to predict clinical benefit. Levaquin has not been Test in humans for Post - Exposure prevention of inhalation Anthrax. The Safety of LEVAQUIN in adults for durations of therapy beyond 28 Days or in Pediatric Patients for durations of therapy beyond 14 Days has not been study. Prolonged LEVAQUIN therapy should only be used when benefits outweigh risk. Levaquin is indicated for treatment of Plague, including pneumonic and septicemic Plague, due to Yersinia pestis and prophylaxis for Plague in adults and pediatric patients, 6 months of age and older. Efficacy Studies of LEVAQUIN could not be conducted in humans with Plague for ethical and feasibility reasons. Therefore, approval of this indication was based on an Efficacy study conducted in animals. Levaquin is indicated in Adult Patients for Treatment of complicated urinary Tract Infections due to Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, or Proteus mirabilis. Levaquin is indicated in Adult Patients for Treatment of complicated urinary Tract Infections due to Enterococcus faecalis, Enterobacter cloacae, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Levaquin is indicated in Adult Patients for Treatment of acute Pyelonephritis caused by Escherichia coli, including cases with concurrent bacteremia. Levaquin is indicated in Adult Patients for Treatment Of Uncomplicated urinary Tract Infections due to Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, or Staphylococcus saprophyticus.


DRUG INTERACTIONS

While chelation by divalent cations is less marked than with other fluoroquinolones, concurrent administration of LEVAQUIN Tablets with antacids containing magnesium, or aluminum, as well as sucralfate, metal cations such as iron, and multivitamin preparations with zinc may interfere with gastrointestinal absorption of levofloxacin, resulting in systemic levels considerably lower than desire. Tablets with antacids containing magnesium, aluminum, as well as sucralfate, metal cations such as iron, and multivitamin preparations with zinc or didanosine may substantially interfere with gastrointestinal absorption of levofloxacin, resulting in systemic levels considerably lower than desire. These agents should be take at least two hours before or two hours after oral LEVAQUIN administration.


Precautions

Fluoroquinolones, including LEVAQUIN, have been associated with increased risk of tendinitis and Tendon Rupture in all ages. This adverse reaction most frequently involves the Achilles Tendon and has also been reported with rotator cuff, hand, biceps, thumb, and other tendon sites. Tendinitis or Tendon Rupture can occur within hours or days of starting LEVAQUIN or as long as several months after completion of fluoroquinolone therapy. Tendinitis and Tendon Rupture can occur bilaterally. The risk of developing fluoroquinolone - associated tendinitis and Tendon Rupture increased in patients over 60 years of age, in those taking corticosteroid drugs, and in patients with kidney, heart or lung transplants. Other factors that may independently increase the risk of Tendon Rupture include strenuous physical activity, renal failure, and previous Tendon Disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis. Tendinitis and Tendon Rupture have been reported in patients taking fluoroquinolones who do not have above risk factors. Discontinue LEVAQUIN immediately if the patient experiences pain, swelling, inflammation or rupture of tendon. Patients should be advised to rest at first sign of tendinitis or Tendon Rupture, and to contact their healthcare provider regarding changing to non - quinolone antimicrobial drug. Avoid LEVAQUIN in patients who have a history of Tendon Disorders or Tendon Rupture.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

How These Antibiotics Work

Fluoroquinolones have been associated with disabling and potentially irreversible serious adverse reactions that have occurred together including: tendinitis and tendon rupture, peripheral neuropathy, and CNS effects. Discontinue drugs immediately and avoid use of Systemic fluoroquinolones in patients who experience any of these serious adverse reactions. May exacerbate muscle weakness in patients with myasthenia gravis; fluoroquinolones should be avoided in patients with a known history of myasthenia gravis. Both oral and injectable fluroquinolones are associated with disabling side effects involving tendons, muscles, joints, nerves and central nervous system. These side effects can occur hours to weeks after exposure to fluoroquinolones and may potentially be permanent because the risk of these serious side effects generally outweighs benefits. For patients with acute bacterial sinusitis, acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis, and uncomplicated UTIs, fluoroquinolones should be reserved for use in patients with these conditions who have no alternative treatment options For some serious bacterial infections, including anthrax, plague, and bacterial pneumonia among others, benefits of fluoroquinolones outweigh risks and it is appropriate For them to remain available as therapeutic option this medication contain Levofloxacin. Do not take Levaquin or Levofloxacin Systemic if you are allergic to Levofloxacin or any ingredients contained in this drug. Keep out of reach of children. In case of overdose, get medical help or contact the Poison Control Center immediately.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

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Sources

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