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Levator claviculae muscle

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Last Updated: 22 November 2020

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General | Latest Info

Levator claviculae muscle

Details
ActionsLifts clavicle
ArteryAscending cervical artery
InsertionLateral half of the clavicle
NerveC2-C5
OriginAnterior portion of transverse processes of C1 - C4 vertebrae
Identifiers
LatinMusculus levator claviculae or musculus omocervicalis

Levator claviculae muscle is normal muscle in lower mammals but is an infrequently recognized variant in humans. It arises from transverse processes of upper cervical vertebrae and inserts in the lateral half of the clavicle. Although this anomaly was first described over 125 years ago, and has been reported to occur in 2 % to 3 % of the population, it has only rarely been described in literature. The importance of this muscle to radiologists is in distinguishing it from abnormality; most commonly, cervical adenopathy. After discovering this muscle on CT scans of two patients during routine clinical examinations, we conducted a study to determine the prevalence and appearance of muscle on CT scans.-H, CT scans obtained from superior to inferior in subjects with left levator claviculae muscle. At most superior level at which it is see, muscle is located lateral to the transverse process of C3 and immediately anterior and lateral to levator scapulae. Its medial margin is posterolateral to longus capitis muscle. AS muscle descends inferiorly, it moves laterally, lying anterior and lateral to levator scapulae. Muscle moves from medial to sternocleidomastoid muscle to posterior to it. Just above its insertion, levator claviculae muscles lie close to the trapezius.-H, CT scans obtained from superior to inferior in subjects with bilateral levator claviculae muscles. Muscles have similar course to levator claviculae muscles in Fig 1. On right, muscles lie anterior to levator scapulae and anteromedial to the trapezius, and appear to be insert near the middle of the clavicle. On left, muscle has more lateral course and insertion

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Results

In our case, levator claviculae was identified AS flat and thin muscle. It spanned 55 mm in length from its origin to insertion, and was 9 mm at its widest part. It was locate posterior to sternocleidomastoid. We find brachial plexus, anterior scalene and omohyoid situate dorsal to this muscle, and internal jugular vein and sternohyoid medial to this muscle. Ascending cervical artery and phrenic nerve run posterior to levator claviculae. Although the phrenic nerve appears to be located behind the anterior scalene, original position of the phrenic nerve was on the ventral surface of the anterior scalene, running obliquely from superior-lateral to inferior-medial. However, AS dissection progress, phrenic nerve was artificially placed dorsal to anterior scalene to facilitate dissection. Ascending cervical artery was not derived from thyrocervical trunk but from transverse cervical artery. Levator claviculae originate from the anterior tubercle of C4 transverse process AS tendinous slip, which makes contact with LCO and longus capitis. However, while levator claviculae run inferiorly, LCO and longus capitis run in superior-medial and superior-lateral directions, respectively. Insertion of levator claviculae was made on posterior upper surface of middle of clavicle AS muscular fascicle, and was approximately 18 mm from insertion point of sternocleidomastoid on clavicle. Unlike its origin, where convergence of three muscles was observe, there were no other muscles sharing this insertion point. Innervation of this muscle was derived from C3 and C4 spinal nerves. C3 and C4 spinal nerves anastomose to form a single branch which crosses over C5 nerve and enters muscle dorsally near its origin. We could not identify any arterial supply to this muscle clearly. Collectively, levator claviculae report herein appear to share common features of previous reports. Overview of levator claviculae. Levator claviculae was found unilaterally in the left lateral cervical region. Its insertion was in the middle of the left clavicle. This panel does not clearly show the origin of muscle. It was located posterior to sternocleidomastoid; anterior to omohyoid, ascending cervical artery and phrenic nerve; and lateral to internal jugular vein. Phrenic nerve and AC run anterior to anterior scalene, AS usual. SCM has been cut in middle and reflects in cranial and caudal direction. Mandibular angle, submandibular gland, sternohyoid, and greater pectoral are also show enlarged view of origin and insertion of levator claviculae. Enlarge superior part of levator claviculae. Origin of levator claviculae was identified AS anterior tubercle of C4 transverse process, AS indicated by pair of tweezers. Longus colli and longus capitis are also inserted onto process.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Conclusion

Levator claviculae is a source of controversy and has yet to be fully explain. However, future molecular embryology will be able to provide detailed description of embryogenesis, and genetics-base analyses will be able to explain homology across species. Advanced imaging techniques such AS echography, CT, and MRI will also accurately elucidate the prevalence and clinical importance of this unusual and rare muscle in humans. Overall, we conclude that levator claviculae shares common embryological origin with levator scapulae. In other words, levator claviculae and levator scapulae arise from the same myotome. This myotome also partially gives rise to both the trapezius and sternocleidomastoid, indicating the possibility that levator claviculae fuses with those two muscles in a few rare cases.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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