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Leverage In A Sentence

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Last Updated: 22 October 2020

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From a grammatical standpoint, one can use any noun as a verb if the meaning is clear in context; whether it is good style is another matter. Thus one can pen letters and so on. Exception to this is where separate verb forms exist already: I can inform you, but not information you. Leverage as a verb is widely used in financial circles when referring to gearing or debt / equity ratio. Outside of financial circles, meaning is metaphorical and perhaps just a fashionable buzz word. The first is specifically financial one, meaning to use credit - so at 2008 crisis, Obama talked of the American economy being over - leveraged: too dependent on credit. A leverage buyout is when one company buys out another, but finances bank loans rather than form its own finances. These were rather popular in the nineties, I think. The second is rather more controversial, and is often seen as business bullshit, and means to generally improve something - He's taking extra courses in an attempt to leverage his career. Incidentally, Americans pronounce these verbs with short e as in bed, while Brits pronounce nouns with long e, asin seat Incidentally, George Orwell, who is generally viewed as an excellent exponent of the English writing style, says the same as Jayles Unwoven. Grammatically, you can use nouns as verbs - he quotes tabling motion. Leveraging is a useful verb as it does not mean same as levering. To learn something, you apply lever to it. To leverage something, you apply it to other end of the lever in order to multiply its effect. So when I used a pick axe at weekend to lift the manhole lid, I was levering the lid but leveraging my strength. In corporate finance, leveraging is not just borrowing, but using credit to increase the effect of some existing assets. Certainly really useful when used well. - Age is a suffix typically forming mass or abstract nouns from various parts of speech, occurring originally in loanwords from French and productive in English with meanings aggregate, process, outcome of as either fact of or physical effect or remains of, place of living or business, social standing or relationship, and quantity, measure, or charge. Thus, words like leverage using suffix - age are prima facie expected to be nouns, and one would normally use root as verb, as in to broker, to break. That say, leverage seems to have developed a special meaning of its own, distinct from lever, so it has become meaningful to use leverage as a verb. In some ways, this is similar to influence, which one would expect to be a noun, like other words ending in - ence or - ance; however we do not bring in root verb influe into English, so we use influence as verb too.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

A confession to finish

Darlene Eckles let her drug - dealing brother operate from her house for six months and helped count his money. Federal prosecutors offered to let her plea to a 10 - year sentence; she rejected the offer and is now serving an almost 20 - year sentence. Federal prosecutors offer to let Patricio Paladin plead in return for a 20 - year sentence for cocaine distribution. He refused to plead and is now serving a sentence of life without parole. Weldon Angelos was offered a plea of 15 years for marijuana distribution and gun possession. He refused plea and is now serving a 55 - year sentence. Eckles, Paladin, and Angelos were convicted of federal drug and gun offenses after rejecting plea offers and opting instead to go to trial. Prosecutors seek their remarkably long sentencesat, least double the time they would have served had they agreed to pleadnot only for their crimes, but for refusing to plead guilty on prosecutors ' terms. The right to trial lies at the heart of the American criminal justice system. Yet trials have become all too rare in the United States because nine out of ten federal and state criminal defendants now end their cases by pleading guilty. There is nothing inherently wrong with resolving cases through guilty pleasit reduces many burdens of trial preparation and trial itself on prosecutors, defendants, judges, and witnesses. But in the US plea bargaining system, many federal prosecutors strong - arm defendants by offering them shorter prison terms if they plead guilty, and threatening them if they go to trial with sentences that, in the words of Judge John Gleeson of the Eastern District of New York, can be so excessively severe, they take your breath away. Such coercive plea bargaining tactics abound in state and federal criminal cases, including federal drug cases, which are the focus of this report. Plea bargaining means higher sentences for defendants who go to trial. In 2012, average sentence of federal drug offenders convicted after trial was three times higher than that received after guilty plea. The threat of higher sentences puts enormous pressure to plead, Mary Pat Brown, former federal prosecutor and senior official in the Justice Department, told US. So much so that plea agreements, once choice to consider, for all intents and purpose, become an offer drug defendants cannot afford to refuse. Only three percent of federal drug defendants go to trial. Human Rights Watch believes this historically low rate of trials reflects an unbalanced and unhealthy criminal justice system. In this report, Human Rights Watch presents cases that illustrate unjust sentences that result from dangerous combination of unfettered prosecutorial power and egregiously severe sentencing laws. We also present new data developed for the report that documents the extent of trial penalty sentences that defendants who go to trial incur compared to what they would receive if they plead guilty. In essence, it is the price prosecutors make defendants pay for exercising their right to trial.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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