Advanced searches left 3/3
Search only database of 7.4 mil and more summaries

Leviticus 27 Commentary

Summarized by PlexPage
Last Updated: 29 October 2020

* If you want to update the article please login/register

General | Latest Info

We also use different external services like Google Webfonts, Google Maps, and external video providers. Since these providers may collect personal data like your IP address, we allow you to block them here. Please be aware that this might heavily reduce the functionality and appearance of our site. Changes will take effect once you reload the page.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Tensions of the Text

Although ancient methods of harvesting were not as efficient as today, Leviticus 19: 9-10 instructs Israelites to make them even less so. First, they were to leave margins of their grain fields unharvested. The width of this margin appears to be up to the owner to decide. Second, they were not to pick up whatever produce fell to the ground. This would apply when harvesters grasp bundle of stalks and cut them with sickle, as well as when grapes fall from cluster just cut from vine. Third, they were to harvest their vineyards just once, presumably taking only ripe grapes so as to leave later ripening ones for their poor and immigrants living among them. These two categories of peoplethe, poor and resident foreignerswere, unify by their lack of owning land and thus were dependent on their own manual labor for food. Laws benefiting the poor were common in the ancient Near East, but only regulations of Israel extend this treatment to resident foreigner. This was yet another way that God's people were to be distinct from surrounding nations. Other texts specify widows and orphans as members of this category. We might classify gleaning as an expression of compassion or justice, but according to Leviticus, allowing others to glean on our property is fruit of holiness. We do it because God say, I am the Lord your God. This highlights the distinction between charity and gleaning. In charity, people voluntarily give to others who are in need. This is a good and noble thing to do, but it is not what Leviticus is talking about. Gleaning is a process in which landowners have an obligation to provide poor and marginalized people access to means of production and to work it themselves. Unlike charity, it does not depend on the generosity of landowners. In this sense, it was much more like a tax than a charitable contribution. Also, unlike charity, it was not given to the poor as a transfer payment. Through gleaning, poor earn their living in the same way as landowners do, by working fields with their own labors. It was simply a command that everyone had the right to access means of provision created by God. In contemporary societies, it may not be easy to discern how to apply principles of gleaning. In many countries, land reform is certainly needed so that land is securely available to farmers, rather than being controlled by capricious government officials or landowners who obtain it corruptly. In more industrialized and knowledge-base economies, land is not the chief factor of production. Access to education, capital, product and job markets, transport systems, and non-discriminatory laws and regulations may be what poor people need to be productive. As Christians may not be more capable than anyone else of determining precisely what solutions will be most effective, solutions need to come from across society. Certainly Leviticus does not contain a system ready-make for today's economies.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Overall Observations of Leviticus 27

The entire chapter deals with those gifts which men have voluntarily purpose and promise to dedicate to God. It is very clear in this chapter and from the context of Leviticus as whole, that the offerings which are vowed here are purely voluntary. Vow-gifts are always set apart from gifts which Israelites were obligated to give their God. The concern of the chapter is not to instruct Israelites that they should make such vows, or how they should make them. Not in Leviticus, nor elsewhere in the Bible, do we find any detailed instructions concerning making of such vows. This seems to be because vow-making was so common in the ancient Near East that it was unnecessary. The thrust of the chapter is regarding if and how Israelites can break their vows. Regulations found in Leviticus 27 are those required by breaking of vows. The values of each offering were precisely determined and penalties for redeeming the offering were given so that Israelites would know if he could renege on his vow and, if so, how he was to go about it. Regulations of this chapter teach Israelites that it is costly matter to break one vow. In some instances, what was vowed could not be redeem, and when it could be redeem, offerer would do so at a high price. In instances where an Israelite would try to illegitimately avoid penalty by substituting offerings, he would lose not only his offering, but substitutes as well. One might be able to reverse his vow, but it wouldnt be done cheaply. The underlying assumption is that man is a fall creature, whose commitments will cool and whose religious zeal will wane. Regulations of Leviticus 27 assume that an Israelite who has vow to make a certain freewill offering to God will very likely cool in his enthusiasm and will therefore attempt to break his vow or to lower the price or quality of his offering. None of the regulations of chapter 27 would have been necessary if it were not for the fall of man and for his sin, which dampened his enthusiasm, minimized his generosity, and hindered his worship.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

logo

Plex.page is an Online Knowledge, where all the summarized are written by a machine. We aim to collect all the knowledge the World Wide Web has to offer.

Partners:
Nvidia inception logo
jooble logo

© All rights reserved
2021 made by Algoritmi Vision Inc.

If your domain is listed as one of the sources on any summary, you can consider participating in the "Online Knowledge" program, if you want to proceed, please follow these instructions to apply.
However, if you still want us to remove all links leading to your domain from Plex.page and never use your website as a source, please follow these instructions.