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Levothyroxine A Hormone

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Last Updated: 17 September 2020

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General | Latest Info

Thyroid Hormone is easy to take. Because it stays in your system for a long time, it can be taken just once a day, and this results in very stable levels of Thyroid Hormone in the blood stream. When Thyroid Hormone is used to treat hypothyroidism, goal of treatment is to keep thyroid function within the same range as people without Thyroid problems. Keeping TSH level in normal range do this. The best time to take Thyroid Hormone is probably first thing in the morning on an empty stomach. This is because food in the stomach can affect absorption of Thyroid Hormone. However, most important thing is to be consistent, and take your Thyroid Hormone at same time, and in the same way, every day. If you are taking several other medications, you should discuss the timing of your Thyroid Hormone dose with your physician. Sometimes taking your Thyroid Hormone at night can make it simpler to prevent your Thyroid Hormone from interacting with food or other medications. Do not stop your Thyroid Hormone without discussing this with your physician. Most thyroid problems are permanent, and therefore, most patients require Thyroid Hormone for life. If you miss dose of Thyroid Hormone, it is usually best to take the missed dose as soon as you remember. It is also safe to take two pills the next day; one in the morning and one in the evening. It is very important that your Thyroid Hormone and TSH levels are checked periodically, even if you are feeling fine, so that your dose of Thyroid Hormone can be adjusted if needed. Taking other medications can sometimes cause people to need higher or lower doses of Thyroid Hormone. Medications that can potentially cause people to need different doses of Thyroid Hormone include birth control pills, estrogen, testosterone, some anti - seizure medications, and some medications for depression. Yet other products can prevent absorption of full dose of Thyroid Hormone. These include iron, calcium, soy, certain antacids and some cholesterollowering medications. For all these reasons, it is important for people taking Thyroid Hormone to keep their physician up to date with any changes in medications or supplements they are taking. Since thyroid hormone is a hormone normally present in the body, it is absolutely safe to take while pregnant. Indeed, it is very important for pregnant women, or women who are planning to become pregnant, to have normal thyroid function to provide an optimum environment for their baby. Women who are taking Thyroid Hormone often need increased dose of Thyroid Hormone during their pregnancy, so it is important to have Thyroid Hormone and TSH levels measured once you know that you are pregnant. You should discuss the timing of Thyroid blood tests with your physician, but often thyroid function is checked at least every trimester. Desiccate animal thyroid, now mainly obtained from pigs, was the most common form of Thyroid Therapy before individual active Thyroid hormones were discover.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

THYROID HORMONE TREATMENT

Your doctor will decide how much to give you based on your: age Health Thyroid Hormone levels Weight If you are older, or you have heart disease, you 'll probably start on a small dose. Your doctor will slowly raise the amount over time until you see an effect. About 6 weeks after you start taking medicine, you 'll go back to your doctor for a blood test to check your Thyroid Hormone levels. Depending on what results are, your dosage may change. Once your levels are stable, you 'll see your doctor for a blood test every 6 months to year.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

DEFINITION, THERAPY & TREATMENT

Many people have thyroid gland that cannot make enough Thyroid hormone for body needs. This is called Hypothyroidism and may be caused by nonfunctioning Thyroid gland, by destruction of Thyroid gland by surgery or radiation treatment or by non - functioning pituitary gland. Hypothyroidism, is the most common reason for needing Thyroid hormone replacement. The goal of Thyroid hormone treatment is to closely replicate normal thyroid functioning. Pure, synthetic thyroxine works in the same way as patients ' own thyroid hormone would. Thyroid hormones are necessary for the health of all cells in the body. Therefore, taking Thyroid hormone is different from taking other medications, because its job is to replace hormone that is missing. Only safety concerns about taking Thyroid hormone are taking too much or too little. Your thyroid function will be monitored by your physician to make sure this does not happen.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Uses

Levothyroxine is used to treat underactive thyroid. It replaces or provides more thyroid hormone, which are normally produced by thyroid gland. Low thyroid hormone levels can occur naturally or when the thyroid gland is injured by radiation / medications or removed by surgery. Having enough thyroid hormone is important for maintaining normal mental and physical activity. In children, having enough thyroid hormones is important for normal mental and physical development. This medication is also used to treat other types of thyroid disorders. This medication should not be used to treat infertility unless it is caused by low thyroid hormone levels.


8. Cautions with other medicines

Some medicines can interfere with thyroid hormones, so the dose of Levothyroxine may need to be change. They include: medicines for seizures, carbamazepine and phenytoin rifampicin amiodarone oestrogens - such as in combined contraceptive pills or hormone replacement therapy. Levothyroxine can change how other medicines work, so their doses may need to be alter. These medicines include: medicines for diabetes - either insulin or tablets blood thinning medicine, warfarin Some medicines shouldn't be taken at the same time of day as Levothyroxine as they can reduce the amount of Levothyroxine your body takes in, including: antacids, calcium salts, iron salts orlistat, medicine used for weight loss sucralfate, medicine use to treat stomach ulcers some cholesterol - lowering medicines such as colestyramine, colestipol or colesevelem read information leaflet supply with these medicines or speak to your pharmacist for advice on how much time to leave between taking these medicines and taking Levothyroxine.


Side Effects

Hair loss may occur during the first few months of treatment. This effect is usually temporary as your body adjusts to this medication. If this effect persists or worsens, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly. Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects. Tell your doctor right away if any of these unlikely but serious effects of high thyroid hormone levels occur: increased sweating, sensitivity to heat, mental / mood changes, tiredness, diarrhea, shaking, headache, shortness of breath, bone pain, easily broken bones. Get medical help right away if any of these rare but serious effects of high thyroid hormone levels occur: chest pain, fast / pounding / irregular heartbeat, swelling hands / ankles / feet, seizures. Very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching / swelling, severe dizziness, trouble breathing. This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1 - 800 - FDA - 1088 or at www. Fda. Gov / medwatch. In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1 - 866 - 234 - 2345.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Side Effects

Taking Iron and Calcium supplements or antacids can decrease the amount of Levothyroxine your body absorbs. Do not take Levothyroxine within 4 hours of taking these supplements or antacids. Levothyroxine can cause severe allergic reaction. Symptoms can include: skin rash or hives, flushing swelling of your face, lips, throat, or tongue, trouble breathing, wheezing stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea fever. If you develop these symptoms, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room. Dont take this drug again if youve ever had allergic reaction to it. Taking it again could be fatal. Certain foods, such as soybean flour, cotton seed meal, walnuts, and other dietary fibers, may affect how well your body absorbs Levothyroxine. For people with heart problems: Levothyroxine can increase your risk of serious heart problems, such as heart attack, abnormal heart rhythm, and heart failure. This risk is increased if youve already had these problems. Tell your doctor if you have heart problems or a history of heart problems. Your doctor may decide to start you on lower dosage of Levothyroxine. For people with Diabetes: Let your doctor know if you have Diabetes. Taking Levothyroxine can make your diabetes worse. Your doctor may monitor your blood sugar level more closely while you take this drug and adjust your Diabetes drugs if needed For people with Osteoporosis: Using Levothyroxine for a long time can cause decreases in your bone mineral density and put you at higher risk of bone fractures. For people with adrenal or Pituitary gland problems: Let your doctor know if you have any adrenal or Pituitary gland problems. Using Levothyroxine can cause changes to your levels of thyroid hormone that could make these problems worse. For people with blood clotting disorders: Let your doctor know if you have any blood clotting disorders. Taking Levothyroxine may make it more difficult for your blood to clot and make bleeding more likely. For pregnant women: Studies of Levothyroxine in pregnant women have shown risk to fetus. Talk to your doctor if youre pregnant or planning to become pregnant. It appears unlikely that this drug will harm pregnancy. Not treating hypothyroidism could cause problems for both you and your pregnancy. You should not stop taking this drug during pregnancy. For women who are breastfeeding: Small amounts of Levothyroxine may pass into breast milk, but this drug is usually safe to take while breastfeeding. Talk to your doctor about the best way to feed your child while taking Levothyroxine. For seniors: If youre older than 65 years, you may be at higher risk of developing negative heart effects while taking this drug. Your doctor may choose to start you on lower dosage. For children: Levothyroxine has only been approved for use in children for treatment of hypothyroidism. Tablets can be used safely by children of all ages.


USE

Synthroid tablets, for oral use is prescription, man - made thyroid hormone that is used to treat a condition called hypothyroidism. It is meant to replace hormone that is usually made by your thyroid gland. Generally, thyroid replacement treatment is to be taken for life. Synthroid should not be used to treat noncancerous growths or enlargement of thyroid in patients with normal iodine levels, or in cases of temporary hypothyroidism caused by inflammation of the thyroid gland. Synthroid tablets, for oral use is prescription, man - made thyroid hormone that is used to treat a condition called hypothyroidism. It is meant to replace hormone that is usually made by your thyroid gland. Generally, thyroid replacement treatment is to be taken for life. Synthroid should not be used to treat noncancerous growths or enlargement of thyroid in patients with normal iodine levels, or in cases of temporary hypothyroidism caused by inflammation of the thyroid gland. Synthroid tablets, for oral use is prescription, man - made thyroid hormone that is used to treat a condition called hypothyroidism. It is meant to replace hormone that is usually made by your thyroid gland. Generally, thyroid replacement treatment is to be taken for life. Synthroid should not be used to treat noncancerous growths or enlargement of thyroid in patients with normal iodine levels, or in cases of temporary hypothyroidism caused by inflammation of the thyroid gland.


What is levothyroxine?

Taking levothyroxine with certain drugs may result in an increase in adverse effects. Examples of these drugs include: antidepressants such as amitriptyline and maprotiline. Side effects of both of these antidepressants and levothyroxine may increase when you take these drugs together. This may put you at risk for irregular heart rhythms. Sympathomimetic drugs such as pseudoephedrine and albuterol. The effects of both sympathomimetic drugs and levothyroxine may increase when you take these drugs together. This may put you at risk of serious heart problems. Blood thinners such as warfarin. Taking these drugs with levothyroxine may increase your risk of bleeding. Your doctor may need to decrease the dosage of your blood thinner if you also taking levothyroxine. Ketamine. Taking this drug with levothyroxine may increase your risk of high blood pressure and fast heart rate.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Thyroid Hormone Replacement Therapy

Healthcare providers do careful blood testing to find the proper dose of hormone replacement therapy for each person. Blood tests reveal levels of thyroid hormones in blood, as well as thyroid - stimulating hormones released by the pituitary gland. The pituitary gland plays an integral role in the functioning of the thyroid gland. It controls how much thyroid hormones are released by making TSH that stimulates thyroid.S Increased levels of TSH may indicate that you have underactive thyroid or that thyroid hormone replacement needs to be increase. You will have lab tests to measure levels of thyroid hormones and TSH. Hypothyroidism can be a progressive disease. This needs dosage increases over time. To make sure that your thyroid hormone replacement works properly, consider the following recommendations: maintain regular visits to your healthcare provider. Take your thyroid medicine at least 1 hour before breakfast and any calcium or iron medicine you may take. Or take at bedtime, or at least 3 hours after eating or taking any calcium or iron medicines. Tell your healthcare provider of your thyroid hormone treatment before beginning treatment for any other disease. Some treatments for other conditions or diseases can affect dosage of thyroid hormone therapy. Let your healthcare provider know if you become pregnant. Tell your healthcare provider of any new symptoms that may arise. Tell all healthcare providers of your thyroid condition and medicine dosage.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

What is thyroxine?

Your Thyroid gland is a small gland, normally weighing less than one ounce, located in front of the neck. It is made up of two halves, called lobes, that lie along the windpipe and are joined together by a narrow band of Thyroid tissue, known as isthmus. Thyroid is situated just below your adams apple or larynx. During development, thyroid gland originates in back of the tongue, but it normally migrates to the front of the neck before birth. Sometimes it fails to migrate properly and is located high in the neck or even in the back of the tongue. This is very rare. At other times, it may migrate too far and end up in chest. The function of the thyroid gland is to take iodine, find it in many foods, and convert it into thyroid hormones: thyroxine and triiodothyronine. Thyroid cells are only cells in the body which can absorb iodine. These cells combine iodine and amino acid tyrosine to make T3 and T4. T3 and T4 are then released into the blood stream and are transported throughout the body where they control metabolism. Every cell in the body depends upon Thyroid hormones for regulation of their metabolism. Normal Thyroid glands produce about 80% T4 and about 20% T3, However, T3 possesses about four times the hormone strength as T4. The thyroid gland is under control of the pituitary gland, small gland size of a peanut at the base of the brain. When the level of Thyroid hormones drops too low, pituitary gland produces Thyroid Stimulating Hormone which stimulates Thyroid gland to produce more hormones. Under the influence of TSH, Thyroids will manufacture and secrete T3 and T4 thereby raising their blood levels. Pituitary senses this and responds by decreasing its TSH production. One can imagine the thyroid gland as a furnace and the pituitary gland as a thermostat. Thyroid hormones are like heat. When heat gets back to the thermostat, it turns the thermostat off. As the room cools, thermostat turns back on and the furnace produces more heat. The pituitary gland itself is regulated by another gland, known as the hypothalamus. The hypothalamus is part of the brain and produces TSH Releasing Hormone which tells the pituitary gland to stimulate the Thyroid gland. One might imagine the hypothalamus as person who regulates thermostat since it tells the pituitary gland at what level the thyroid should BE set.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis

The term Thyroiditis refers to inflammation of the thyroid gland. There are many possible causes of Thyroiditis. Hashimotos Thyroiditis, also know as chronic lymphocytic Thyroiditis, is the most common cause of Hypothyroidism in the United States. It is an autoimmune disorder involving chronic inflammation of the thyroid. This condition tends to run in families. Over time, ability of the Thyroid gland to produce Thyroid hormones often becomes impaired and leads to gradual decline in function and eventually underactive Thyroid. Hashimotos Thyroiditis occurs most commonly in middle aged women, but can be seen at any age, and can also affect men and children. There are no signs or symptoms that are unique to Hashimotos Thyroiditis. Because the condition usually progresses very slowly over many years, people with Hashimotos Thyroiditis may not have any symptoms early on, even when characteristic Thyroid peroxidase antibodies are detected in blood tests. Tpo is an enzyme that plays a role in production of Thyroid hormones. If Hashimotos Thyroiditis causes cell damage leading to low Thyroid Hormone levels, patients will eventually develop symptoms of Hypothyroidism. Hypothyroid symptoms may include fatigue, weight gain, constipation, increased sensitivity to cold, dry skin, depression, muscle aches and reduced exercise tolerance, and irregular or heavy menses. In some cases, inflammation causes thyroid to become enlarged, which rarely causes neck discomfort or difficulty swallowing. Diagnosis of Hashimotos Thyroiditis may be made when patients present with symptoms of Hypothyroidism, often accompanied by goiter on physical examination, and laboratory testing of Hypothyroidism, which is elevated Thyroid stimulating Hormone with or without low Thyroid Hormone levels. Tpo antibody, when measure, is usually elevate. Occasionally, disease may be diagnosed early, especially in people with strong family history of Thyroid disease. Tpo antibody may be positive, but Thyroid Hormone levels may be normal or there may only be isolated mild elevation of serum TSH is see. Symptoms of Hypothyroidism may be absent. Patients with elevated TPO antibodies but normal Thyroid function tests do not require treatment. Patients with only slightly elevated TSH may not require medication and should have repeat testing after 3 - 6 months if this has not already been done. For patients with overt hypothyroidism, treatment consists of Thyroid Hormone replacement. Synthetic levothyroxine taken orally at appropriate dose, is inexpensive, very effective in restoring normal Thyroid Hormone levels, and results in improvement of symptoms of Hypothyroidism. Most patients with Hashimotos Thyroiditis will require lifelong treatment with levothyroxine. Finding the appropriate dose, particularly at the beginning, may require testing for TSH every 6 - 8 weeks after any dose adjustment, until the correct dose is determine. After that, monitoring of TSH once year is generally sufficient. When levothyroxine is taken in appropriate dose, it has no side effects. However, when insufficient dose is take, serum TSH remains elevated and patients may have persistent symptoms of Hypothyroidism.


Alternative names for Hashimotos disease

Treatment is carried out as outpatient and depends on how well the thyroid gland is working. Life levothyroxine tablets are needed to treat hypothyroidism because they replace hormones that the thyroid gland is no longer producing in sufficient quantities. Blood tests to measure thyroid hormones will be needed to ensure the dose is correct. This is arranged initially every few weeks, then less often, once the right dose has been determine. A doctor will advise on the right course of treatment for each individual case. Doctors often have a lower threshold for commencing thyroid hormone replacement in women with mild Hashimotos disease who are pregnant, or planning pregnancy. Very rarely, thyroid surgery can be required, especially if the thyroid gland is very swollen, making it difficult to eat or breathe or if cells obtained with fine needle aspiration show lymphoma or other suspicious cancer cells.


Symptoms

Hashimotos disease tends to develop gradually over long periods of time. Thyroid gland usually is not painful. However, it can be swell and rubbery to touch or, in some cases, it can be normal in size or smaller Symptoms and signs are variable and non - specific amongst different individuals depending on the degree of thyroid malfunction. They can range from very few or none if thyroid gland is only mildly affected to several of them if levels of thyroid hormones are low or very low. Less commonly, some patients may develop initially overactive thyroid phase that is short life. Some of the symptoms people might experience include: dry skin, brittle hair, weight gain, general fatigue, hoarseness and intolerance to cold weather. Low mood, poor concentration and forgetfulness are also common. The heart and lungs can be affected, causing fluid retention, breathlessness and decreased tolerance to exercise. Bowel movements can slow down, causing constipation and joints and muscles can feel weak, stiff, achy or painful. Carpal tunnel syndrome can also develop and usually improve with treatment. Women may notice change in their periods, usually becoming heavier than normal.


Treatment

The mainstay of treatment for hypothyroidism is thyroid hormone replacement. The drug of choice is titrated levothyroxine sodium administered orally. It has a half - life of 7 days and can be given daily. It should not be given with iron or calcium supplements, aluminum hydroxide, and proton pump inhibitors to avoid suboptimal absorption. It is best to take early in the morning on an empty stomach for optimum absorption. The standard dose is 1. 6 - 1. 8 mcg / kg per day, but it can vary from one patient to another. Patients less than 50 years old should be commence on standard full dose; however, lower doses should be used in patients with cardiovascular diseases and elderly. In patients older than 50 years, recommended starting dose is 25 mcg / day with reevaluation in six to eight weeks. In contrast, in pregnancy, dose of thyroxine needs to be increased by 30%, and in patients with short - bowel syndrome, increased doses of levothyroxine are needed to maintain euthyroid state. There is less evidence to support an autoimmune / anti - inflammatory diet. The theory behind inflammation has to do with leaky gut syndrome, where there is insult to gut mucosa, which allows penetrance of proteins that do not typically enter the bloodstream via transporters in gut mucosa. It is theorized that response similar to molecular mimicry occurs, and antibodies are produced against antigens. Unfortunately, antigen may be very structurally similar to thyroid peroxidase, leading to antibody formation against this enzyme. The concept of autoimmune diet is based on healing the gut and decreasing the severity of autoimmune response. More research is required on this topic before it becomes part of guidelines.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

OVERVIEW

Thyroid Gland is a butterfly - shaped organ located at the base of your neck. It releases hormones that control the way your body uses energy. Thyroid's hormones regulate vital body functions, including: breathing, heart rate, Central and peripheral nervous systems, body weight, muscle strength, menstrual cycles, body temperature, cholesterol levels much more! Thyroid gland is about 2 - inches long and lies in front of your throat below the prominence of thyroid cartilage, sometimes called Adam's apple. Thyroid has two sides called lobes that lie on either side of your windpipe, and is usually connected by a strip of thyroid tissue known as isthmus. Some people do not have isthmus, and instead have two separate Thyroid lobes. How the Thyroid Gland Works The Thyroid is part of the endocrine system, which is made up of glands that produce, store, and release hormones into the bloodstream so hormones can reach the body's cells. Thyroid Gland uses iodine from foods you eat to make two main hormones: triiodothyronine and thyroxine. It is important that T3 and T4 levels are neither too high nor too low. Two glands in the head, hypothalamus and pituitary, communicate to maintain T3 and T4 balance. The Hypothalamus produces TSH Releasing Hormone that signals pituitary to tell Thyroid Gland to produce more or less of T3 and T4 by either increasing or decreasing release of hormone called Thyroid stimulating Hormone. When T3 and T4 levels are low in the blood, pituitary gland releases more TSH to tell the Thyroid Gland to produce more Thyroid hormones. If T3 and T4 levels are high, pituitary Gland releases less TSH to Thyroid Gland to slow production of these hormones. Why You Need Thyroid Gland T3 and T4 travel in your bloodstream to reach almost every cell in your body. Hormones regulate the speed at which cells / metabolism work. For example, T3 and T4 regulate your heart rate and how fast your intestines process food. So if T3 and T4 levels are low, your heart rate may be slower than normal, and you may have constipation / weight gain. If T3 and T4 levels are high, you may have rapid heart rate and diarrhea / weight loss. List below are other symptoms of too much T3 and T4 in your body: anxiety, Irritability or moodiness, nervousness, hyperactivity, sweating or sensitivity to high temperatures Hand trembling, hair loss miss or light Menstrual periods following are other symptoms that may indicate too little T3 and T4 in your body: trouble sleeping Tiredness and fatigue Difficulty concentrating Dry skin and hair Depression Sensitivity to cold temperature Frequent, heavy periods Joint and Muscle pain

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

CASE REPORT

Case Reports Of Three Hypothyroid Patients Requiring Very High Doses Of Levothyroxine The Typical dose of Levothyroxine for treatment of Hypothyroidism ranges from 100 to 200 G per day with an estimated requirement of 1. 7 G per kg per day. There are, however, variety of reasons why higher than expected doses of Levothyroxine may be required to achieve and maintain euthyroidism in Hypothyroid. These include pseudo absorption, drug interference, mal - absorption and increased hepatic metabolism of Levothyroxine. We report on three of our patients who require much - higher - than - expected doses of Levothyroxine to achieve and sustain euthyroid status. Description Of Three Hypothyroid Patients managed at the Endocrine Clinic Of Nelson Mandela Academic Hospital from 2008 to now Requiring much higher than usual doses of Levothyroxine was used to manage other Hypothyroid Patients. Likely reasons for higher - than - expected doses of Levothyroxine medication are also discuss. Write permission was obtained from patients to report cases. A 38 - year - old female with Cushings disease diagnosed in 1998 was initially treated surgically in 1998 and 2004 with a subsequent course of conventional radiotherapy in 2004. She developed panhypopituitarism. Her other co - morbidities include systemic hypertension since 1998, human immunodeficiency virus positive on anti - retrovirals therapy since 2008 and bilateral necrosis of both femoral heads with left hip replacement in 2012. She weighs 78 kg with a height of 1. 59 M and a body mass index of 30. 9 kg / M 2. Her blood pressure was 132 / 67 mm Hg. Recent results show normal Thyroid hormone levels and CD4 cell count of 580 cells / mm 3. She maintains a biochemical euthyroid profile on a daily Levothyroxine dose of 450 G. Her other medications include daily doses of desmopressin 0. 15 mg, hydrocortisone 20 mg, calcium gluconate 3 G, premarin 0. 625 mg, medroxyprogesterone 10 mg, enalapril 20 mg, hydrocholorothiazide 12. 5 mg, amylodipine 5 mg, atenolol 100 mg, cotrimoxazole two tablets, tramadol 300 mg, diclofenac 150 mg, stavudine 40 mg, lamuvidine 300 mg and efavirenz 600 mg. 42 - year - old female with primary Hypothyroidism was diagnosed in 2010. There is also a background history of hypertension, bronchial asthma and peptic ulcer disease. She weighs 134 kg with a height of 1. 62 M and a BMI of 51. 1 kg / M 2. She was clinically and biochemically euthyroid on a daily Levothyroxine dose of 300 G. Her Other medications include daily doses of frusemide 40 mg, cimetidine 800 mg, simvastatin 20 mg and budesonide 800 G. 18 - year - old male had congenital primary Hypothyroidism, epilepsy and mental retardation. He weighs 58 kg with a height of 1. 46 M and a BMI of 27. 2 kg / M 2. He has remain euthyroid on a daily Levothyroxine dose of 400 G. His other medications include daily doses of sodium valproate 800 mg and folic acid 5 mg. Table 1 shows key demographic, diagnoses and treatment profiles for three patients. These three cases are of patients with frank Hypothyroidism on doses of Levothyroxine exceeding expected daily doses based on 1. 7 G per kg. Three patients were on stable doses of Levothyroxine and their concomitant medications for over 6 months.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Drug Class: Thyroid products

Levothyroxine should not be used alone or along with other treatments to treat obesity or cause weight loss. Levothyroxine may cause serious or life - threatening problems when given in large doses, especially when taken with amphetamines such as amphetamine, dextroamphetamine, and methamphetamine. Tell your doctor if you have any of the following symptoms while you are taking Levothyroxine: chest pain, rapid or irregular heartbeat or pulse, uncontrollable shaking of part of your body, nervousness, anxiety, irritability, difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep, shortness of breath, or excessive sweating. Talk to your doctor about potential risks associated with this medication. Levothyroxine is used to treat hypothyroidism. It is also used with surgery and radioactive iodine therapy to treat thyroid cancer. Levothyroxine is in a class of medications called hormones. It works by replacing thyroid hormone that is normally produced by the body. Without thyroid hormone, your body cannot function properly, which may result in poor growth, slow speech, lack of energy, excessive tiredness, constipation, weight gain, hair loss, dry, thick skin, increased sensitivity to cold, joint and muscle pain, heavy or irregular menstrual periods, and depression. When taken correctly, Levothyroxine reverses these symptoms. Levothyroxine comes as a tablet and capsule to take by mouth. It usually takes once a day on an empty stomach, 30 minutes to 1 hour before breakfast. Follow directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take Levothyroxine exactly as direct. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor. Swallow capsules whole; do not chew or crush them. Do not remove the capsule from the package until you are ready to take it. Take tablets with a full glass of water as they may get stuck in your throat or cause choking or gagging. If you are giving Levothyroxine to an infant, child, or adult who cannot swallow tablet, crush and mix it with 1 to 2 teaspoons of water. Only mix crushed tablets with water; do not mix it with food or soybean infant formula. Give this mixture by spoon or dropper right away. Do not store it for later use. Your doctor will probably start you on a low dose of Levothyroxine and gradually increase your dose. Levothyroxine Control hypothyroidism but does not cure it. It may take several weeks before you notice a change in your symptoms. Continue to take Levothyroxine even if you feel well. Do not stop taking Levothyroxine without talking to your doctor.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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