Advanced searches left 3/3
Search only database of 7.4 mil and more summaries

Lewis Dot Structure For Si

Summarized by PlexPage
Last Updated: 22 October 2020

* If you want to update the article please login/register

General | Latest Info

Thus far in this chapter, we have discussed various types of bonds that form between atoms and / or ions. In all cases, these bonds involve sharing or transfer of valence shell electrons between atoms. In this section, we will explore typical methods for depicting valence shell electrons and chemical bonds, namely Lewis Symbols and Lewis Structures. Dalton knew of the experiments of French chemist Joseph Proust, who demonstrated that all samples of pure compound contain same elements in same proportion by mass. This statement is known as the law of Definite Proportions or law of constant composition. The suggestion that numbers of Atoms of Elements in give compound always exist in the same ratio is consistent with these observations. For example, when different samples of isooctane are analyze, they are found to have a carbon - to - hydrogen mass ratio of 5. 33: 1, as show In. It is worth noting that although all samples of a particular compound have the same mass ratio, converse is not true in general. That is, samples that have the same mass ratio are not necessarily the same substance. For example, there are many compounds other than isooctane that also have a carbon - to - hydrogen mass ratio of 5. 33: 1. 00. Dalton also uses data from Proust, as well as results from his own experiments, to formulate another interesting law. The Law of Multiple Proportions states that when two elements react to form more than one compound, fixed mass of one element will react with masses of other elements in a ratio of small, whole numbers. For example, copper and chlorine can form green, crystalline solids with a mass ratio of 0. 558 g chlorine to 1 g copper, as well as brown crystalline solid with a mass ratio of 1. 116 g chlorine to 1 g copper. These ratios by themselves may not seem particularly interesting or informative; However, if we take the ratio of these ratios, we obtain a useful and possibly surprising result: small, whole - number ratio. {matheq}\frac{\frac{1.116 \text{ g Cl}}{1 \text{ g Cu}}}{\frac{0.558 \text{ g Cl}}{1 \text{ g Cu}}} = \frac{2}{1}{endmatheq} this can be explained by Atomic Theory if the copper - to - chlorine ratio in the brown compound is 1 copper atom to 2 chlorine atoms, and the ratio in the green compound is 1 copper atom to 1 chlorine atom. The ratio of chlorine atoms is therefore 2 to 1. The earliest recorded discussion of the basic structure of matter came from ancient Greek philosophers, scientists of their day. In the fifth century BC, Leucippus and Democritus argued that all matter was composed of small, finite particles that they called atomos, term derived from the Greek word for indivisible. They think of atoms as moving particles that differ in shape and size, and which could join together. Later, Aristotle and others came to the conclusion that matter consists of various combinations of four elementsfire, earth, air, and water could be infinitely divide. Interestingly, these philosophers think about Atoms and Elements as philosophical concepts, but apparently never consider performing experiments to test their ideas.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Lewis Symbols of Monoatomic Elements

Table

BondBond Length
N-N1.47 A
N=N1.24 A
NN1.10 A

Lewis symbols use dots to visually represent the valence of electrons of an atom. Lewis symbols are diagrams that represent the valence of electrons of an atom. Lewis structures are diagrams that represent valence electrons of atoms within molecule. These Lewis symbols and Lewis structures help visualize valence electrons of atoms and molecules, whether they exist as lone pairs or within bonds. Atom consists of a positively charged nucleus and negatively charged electrons. Electrostatic attraction between them keeps electrons bound to the nucleus so they stay within a certain distance of it. Careful investigations have shown that not all electrons within the atom have the same average position or energy. We say electrons reside at different principal energy levels, and these levels exist at different radii from nucleus and have rules regarding how many electrons they can accommodate. Principal energy levels of gold: figure shows the organization of electrons around the nucleus of gold atom. Notice that the first energy level can have only two electrons, while more electrons can fit within give level further out. The number of electrons in each level is listed in the upper right corner of the figure. Notice that the outermost level has only one electron. As example, neutral atom of gold contains 79 protons in its nucleus and 79 electrons. The first principal energy level, which is one closest to the nucleus, can hold a maximum of two electrons. The second principal energy level can have 8, third can have 18, and so on, until all 79 electrons have been distribute. Outermost principal energy level is of great interest in chemistry because electrons it holds are furthest away from the nucleus, and therefore are ones most loosely held by its attractive force; larger distance between two charged objects, smaller force they exert on each other. Chemical reactivity of all of the different elements in the Periodic Table depends on the number of Electrons in that last, outermost level, called valence level or valence shell. In the case of gold, there is only one valence electron in its valence level. Atoms gain, lose, or share electrons in their valence level in order to achieve greater stability, or lower energy state. From this perspective, bonds between atoms form so that bond atoms are in a lower energy state compared to when they were by themselves. Atoms can achieve this more stable state by having a valence level which contains as many electrons as they can hold. For the first principal energy level, having two electrons in it is the most stable arrangement, while for all other levels outside of the first, eight electrons are necessary to achieve the most stable state. In Lewis symbol for atom, chemical symbol of an element is write, and valence electrons are represented as dots surrounding it. Only Electrons in valence level are shown using this notation.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Lewis Structures

We also use Lewis symbols to indicate the formation of covalent bonds, which are shown in Lewis structures, drawings that describe bonding in molecules and polyatomic ions. For example, when two chlorine atoms form chlorine molecule, they share one pair of electrons: Lewis structure indicates that each Cl atom has three pairs OF electrons that are not used in bonding and one share pair of electrons. Dash is sometimes used to indicate shared pair of electrons: single shared pair of electrons is called single bond. Each Cl atom interacts with eight valence electrons: six in lone pairs and two in single bond.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

The Octet Rule

Why are some substances chemically bond molecules and others are association with ions? The answer to this question depends upon electronic structures OF atoms and the nature of chemical forces within compounds. Although there are NO sharply defined boundaries, chemical bonds are typically classified into three main types: ionic bonds, Covalent bonds, and Metallic bonds. In this chapter, each type of bond will be discussed and general properties found in typical substances in which bond type occur ionic bonds result from electrostatic forces that exist between ions of opposite charge. These bonds typically involve metal with nonmetal - covalent bonds that result from sharing OF electrons between two atoms. Bonds typically involve one nonmetallic element with another metallic bond. These bonds are found in solid metal with each metal bond to several neighboring groups and bonding electrons free to move throughout the 3 - dimensional structure. Each bond classification is discussed in detail in subsequent sections OF chapter. Let's look at preferred arrangements of electrons in atoms when they form chemical compounds. Figure 8. 11: G. N. Lewis and Octet Rule. Lewis is working in a laboratory. In Lewis ' original sketch For Octet Rule, he initially placed electrons at corners of the cube rather than placing them as we do now. In 1904, Richard Abegg formulated what is now known as Abegg's Rule, which states that the difference between maximum positive and negative valences of element is frequently eight. This rule was used later in 1916 when Gilbert N. Lewis formulated the Octet Rule in his cubical atom theory. The Octet Rule refers to the tendency OF atoms to prefer to have eight electrons in valence shell. When atoms have fewer than eight electrons, they tend to react and form more stable compounds. Atoms will react to getting in most stable state possible. Complete Octet is very stable because all orbitals will be full. Atoms with greater stability have less energy, so reactions that increase stability of atoms will release energy in the form of heat or light; reactions that decrease stability must absorb energy, getting colder. When discussing the Octet Rule, we do not consider d or F electrons. Only S and P electrons are involved in the Octet Rule, making it a useful rule for main group elements; Octet in these atoms corresponds to electron configurations ending with S 2 P 6. Lewis dot symbols can also be used to represent ions in ionic compounds. Reaction of cesium with fluorine, For example, to produce ionic compound CsF can be written as follow: NO dots are shown on Cs + in product because cesium has lost its single valence electron to fluorine. Transfer OF this electron produces Cs + ion, which has a valence electron configuration OF Xe, and F ion, which has a total OF eight valence electrons and Ne electron configuration.


Electron-deficient Molecules

We will also encounter a few molecules that contain central atoms that do not have fill valence shell. Generally, these are molecules with central atoms from groups 2 and 12, outer atoms that are hydrogen, or other atoms that do not form multiple bonds. For example, in Lewis structures of beryllium dihydride, BeH 2, and boron trifluoride, BF 3, beryllium and boron atoms each have only four and six electrons, respectively. It is possible to draw a structure with a double bond between boron atom and fluorine atom in BF 3, satisfying the octet rule, but experimental evidence indicates bond lengths are closer to that expected for B - F single bonds. This suggests the best Lewis structure has three B - F single bonds and electron deficient boron. Reactivity of compound is also consistent with electron deficient boron. However, B - F bonds are slightly shorter than what is actually expected for B - F single bonds, indicating that some double bond characters are found in actual molecule. Atoms like boron atom in BF 3, which do not have eight electrons, are very reactive. It readily combines with molecule containing atom with a lone pair of electrons. For example, NH 3 reacts with BF 3 because lone pair of nitrogen can be shared with boron atom:

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Double and Triple Bonds

As previously mention, when a pair of atoms share one pair of electrons, we call this a single bond. However, pair of atoms may need to share more than one pair of electrons in order to achieve the requisite octet. Double bond forms when two pairs of electrons are shared between a pair of atoms, as between carbon and oxygen atoms in CH 2 O and between two carbon atoms in C 2 H 4: triple bond forms when three electron pairs are shared by a pair of atoms, as in carbon monoxide and cyanide ion:

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Example 3

Table

BondBond Length
N-N1.47 A
N=N1.24 A
NN1.10 A

Draw Lewis dot structures and resonance structures for following. Some hints are give. {matheq}{CO2}{endmatheq} plus two more dots for each of {matheq}\textrm{:O::C::O:}{endmatheq} {matheq}{O}{endmatheq} {matheq}{NO2}{endmatheq} {matheq}\textrm{:O::C::O:}{endmatheq} {matheq}\textrm{:O::C::O:}{endmatheq} notice that some of resonance structures may not satisfy the octet rule. {matheq}\textrm{:O::C::O:}{endmatheq} molecule has an odd number of electrons, and the octet rule cannot be satisfied for nitrogen atom. Draw resonance structures of {matheq}\textrm{:O::C::O:}{endmatheq} resonance structure are shown on the right here. Note that only locations of double and single bonds change here. What are formal charges for {matheq}\textrm{:O::C::O:}{endmatheq} atoms? What are formal charges for oxygen atoms that are single bond and double bond to {matheq}\textrm{:O::C::O:}{endmatheq} respectively? Please work these numbers out. Formal charges: {matheq}\textrm{:O::C::O:}{endmatheq} + 1; {matheq}\textrm{:O::C::O:}{endmatheq} 0; {matheq}\textrm{:O::C::O:}{endmatheq} most stable structure has least formal charge. In a stable structure, adjacent atoms should have formal charges of opposite signs. The more stable the structure, more it contributes to the resonance structure of molecule or ion. All three structures above are the same, only the double bond rotates.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

Table2

1234
.. S / \ :O: :O: ' ' ' '.. S // \ :O: :O: ' '.. S / \ :O: :O: ' '.. S // \ :O: :O:
* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Fullerene Chemistry

Carbon soot has been known to man since prehistoric times, but it was not until fairly recently that the molecular structure of the main component of soot was discover. In 1996, Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Richard Smalley, Robert Curl, and Harold Kroto for their work in discovering a new form of carbon, C 60 buckminsterfullerene molecule. Entire classes of compounds, including spheres and tubes of various shapes, were discovered based on C 60. This type of molecule, called fullerene, shows promise in a variety of applications. Because of their size and shape, fullerenes can encapsulate other molecules, SO they have shown potential in various applications from hydrogen storage to target drug delivery systems. They also possess unique electronic and optical properties that have been put to good use in solar powered devices and chemical sensors.


Key Concepts and Summary

The plot of overall energy of covalent bond as function of internuclear distance is identical to the plot of ionic pair because both result from attractive and repulsive forces between charge entities. In Lewis electron structures, we encounter bonding pairs, which are shared by two atoms, and lone pairs, which are not shared between atoms. If both electrons in a covalent bond come from the same atom, bond is called a coordinate covalent bond. Lewis structures are an attempt to rationalize why certain stoichiometries are commonly observed for elements of particular families. Neutral compounds of group 14 elements typically contain four bonds around each atom, whereas neutral compounds of group 15 elements typically contain three bonds. In cases where it is possible to write more than one Lewis electron structure with octets around all nonhydrogen atoms of the compound, formal charge on each atom in alternative structures must be considered to decide which of valid structures can be excluded and which is most reasonable. Formal charge is the difference between the number of valence electrons of a free atom and the number of electrons assigned to it in a compound, where bonding electrons are divided equally between bond atoms. The Lewis structure with lowest formal charges on atoms is almost always the most stable one. Some molecules have two or more chemically equivalent Lewis electron structures, called resonance structures. These structures are written with double - head arrow between them, indicating that none of Lewis ' structures accurately describes bonding but that the actual structure is an average of individual resonance structures.


Lewis Structures

Lewis dot symbols provide a simple rationalization of why elements form compounds with observed stoichiometries. In the Lewis model, number of bonds formed by element in neutral compound is same as the number of unpaired Electrons it must share with other atoms to complete its octet of Electrons. For elements of group 17, this number is one; for elements of group 16, it is two; for group 15, three; and for group 14, four. These requirements are illustrated by following Lewis structures for hydrides of lightest members of each group: elements may form multiple bonds to complete the octet. In ethylene, for example, each carbon contributes two electrons to double bond, giving each carbon octet. Neutral structures with fewer or more bonds exist, but they are unusual and violate the octet rule. Allotropes of elements can have very different physical and chemical properties because of different three - dimensional arrangements of atoms; number of bonds formed by component atoms, however, is always the same. As noted at the beginning of the chapter, diamond is hard, transparent solid; graphite is soft, black solid; and fullerenes have open cage structures. Despite these differences, carbon atoms in all three Allotropes form four bonds, in accordance with the octet rule. Elemental Phosphorus also exists in three forms: White Phosphorus, toxic, waxy substance that initially glows and then spontaneously ignites on contact with air; Red Phosphorus, amorphous substance that is used commercially in safety matches, fireworks, and smoke bombs; and Black Phosphorus, unreactive crystalline solid with a texture similar to graphite. Nonetheless, phosphorus atoms in all three forms obey the octet rule and form three bonds per Phosphorus atom.


Lewis Symbols

We use Lewis symbols to describe valence electron configurations of atoms and monatomic ions. Lewis symbols {: Data - type = term} Consist of an elemental symbol surrounded by one dot for each of its valence electrons: shows Lewis symbols for elements of the third period of the periodic table. Lewis symbols can also be used to illustrate formation of cations from atoms, as shown here for sodium and calcium: likewise, they can be used to show formation of anions from atoms, as shown here for chlorine and sulfur: demonstrate use of Lewis symbols to show transfer of electrons during formation of ionic compounds.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Key Concepts and Summary

9 Plot of Potential Energy versus Internuclear Distance for Interaction between Two Gaseous Hydrogen Atoms at long distances, both attractive and Repulsive Interactions are small. As the distance between atoms decreases, attractive electron - proton interactions dominate, and energy of system decreases. At observed bond distance, repulsive electron - electron and proton - proton interactions just balance attractive interactions, preventing further decrease in Internuclear distance. At very short internuclear distances, repulsive interactions dominate, making the system less stable than isolated atoms. There are three equivalent resonance structures for nitrate, in which nitrogen is doubly bonded to one of three oxygens. In each resonance structure, formal charge of N is + 1; for each singly bonded O, it is 1; and for doubly bonded oxygen, it is 0. The following is an example of the Lewis Structure that is not plausible: this structure nitrogen has six bonds and a formal charge of - 1. With four S - O single bonds, each oxygen in SO 4 2 has a formal charge of 1, and central sulfur has a formal charge of + 2. With two S = O double bonds, only two oxygens have a formal charge of - 1, and sulfur has a formal charge of zero. Lewis structures that minimize formal charges tend to be lowest in energy, making the Lewis Structure with two S = O double bonds most probable.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Exercises

Lewis ' notation uses dots and crosses to represent the valence of electrons on different atoms. The chemical symbol of an element is used to represent the nucleus and inner electrons of an atom. To determine which valence of electrons, we look at last energy level in the atom's electronic structure. For example, chlorine's electronic structure can be written as: {matheq}1\text{s}^{2}2\text{s}^{2}2\text{p}^{6}3\text{s}^{2}3\text{p}^{5}{endmatheq} or {matheq}[\text{Ne}]3\text{s}^{2}3\text{p}^{5}{endmatheq} last energy level is third one and it contains 7 electrons. These are valence electrons. The hydrogen atom would be represented like this: chlorine atom would look like this: molecule of hydrogen chloride would be shown like this: dot and cross in between two atoms, representing a pair of electrons that share a covalent bond. For carbon dioxide, you can see how we represent double bond in Lewis notation. As there are two bonds between each oxygen atom and carbon atom, two pairs of valence electrons link them. Similarly, hydrogen cyanide shows how to represent triple bond. 2. False, because electrons do not move around, only atoms. 3. Below are all Lewis dot Structure with formal charges for Sulfate. There isn't most favorable resonance of Sulfate ions because they are all identical in charge and there is NO change in electronegativity between oxygen atoms. 4. Below is Resonance for CH 3 COO -, formal charges are displayed in red. Lewis Structure with most formal charges is not desirable, because we want Lewis Structure with least formal charge. 5. Resonance for HPO 3 2 -, and formal charges. 6. Resonance for CHO 2 1 -, and formal charges. 7. Resonance hybrid for PO 4 3 -, hybrid bonds are in red. 8. Resonance hybrid for NO 3 -, hybrid bonds are in red.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Example 1

Table

BondBond Length
N-N1.47 A
N=N1.24 A
NN1.10 A

Gn Lewis uses dots to represent the valence of electrons in his teaching of chemical bonding. He eventually published his theory of chemical bonding in 1916. He put dots around symbols so that we see valence electrons for main group elements. Formation of chemical bonds to complete the requirement of eight electrons for atom become natural tendency. Lewis dot symbols of the first two periods are given here to illustrate this point. In fact, entire group of elements have the same Lewis dot symbols, because they have the same number of valence electrons. Lewis dot Structures are useful in explaining chemical bonding in molecules or ions. When several dot structures are reasonable for molecule or ion, they all contribute to molecular or ionic structure, making it more stable. Representation of molecular or ionic structure by several structures is called resonance. The more stable dot structure is, more it contributes to the electronic structure of molecule or ion. You need to know what dot structures represent, how to draw them, and what formal charges for atoms in structure are. When several dot structures are possible, consider resonance structures to interpret real structure. Apply some simple rules to explain which resonance structures are major contributors to electronic structure. Formal charge on any atom in Lewis structure is the number assigned to it according to the number of valence electrons of atom and number of electrons around it. The formal charge of an atom is equal to the number of valence electrons, N ve minus number of unshared electrons, N us. E and half of bonding electrons, N be some practice of assigning formal charge is necessary before you master this technique. Some examples of drawing Lewis structure and assigning formal charge are given below. Formal charge is a hypothetical charge from dot structure. Formal charges in structure tell us the quality of the dot structure. When several structures with different electron distributions among bonds are possible, all structures contribute to the electronic structure of the molecule. These structures are called resonance structures. The combination of all these resonance structures represents real or observed structure. Lewis structures of some molecules do not agree with observed structures. For such molecule, several dot structures may be Draw. All dot structures contribute to real structure. More stable structures contribute more than less stable ones. For resonance structures, skeleton of molecule stays in the same relative position, and only distributions of electrons in resonance structures are different. Let us return to {matheq}{SO2}{endmatheq} molecule. The molecule has a bent structure due to lone pair of electrons on {matheq}{S}{endmatheq} in last structure that has formal charge, there is a single {matheq}{S-O}{endmatheq} bond and double {matheq}{S=O}{endmatheq} bond. These two bonds can switch over, giving two resonance structures as shown below.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

Table2

1234
.. S / \ :O: :O: ' ' ' '.. S // \ :O: :O: ' '.. S / \ :O: :O: ' '.. S // \ :O: :O:
* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Example 2

Table

BondBond Length
N-N1.47 A
N=N1.24 A
NN1.10 A

Draw Lewis dot structure for {matheq}{SO2}{endmatheq} {matheq}\mathrm{ :\overset{\Large{..}}O : :\overset{\Large{..}}S : :\overset{\Large{..}}O :}{endmatheq} put all atoms together to make a molecule and check to see if it satisfies the octet rule. {matheq}\begin{alignat}{1} :&\overset{\Large{..}}{ O} : :&&\overset{\Large{..}}{ S} : :&&\overset{\Large{..}}{ O} : &&\textrm{ <= octet rule not satisfied}\ &\,0 &&\,0 &&\,0 &&\textrm{ formal charge} \end{alignat}{endmatheq} adjusts bonding electrons so that octet rules apply to all atoms. {matheq}\begin{alignat}{1} &:\underset{\Large{..}}{\overset{\Large{..}}{ O}} &&:\overset{\Large{..}}{ S} : :&&\overset{\Large{..}}{ O} : &&\textrm{ <- octet rule satisfied}\ &\,{-1} &&\,{+1} &&\,0 &&\textrm{ formal charge} \end{alignat}{endmatheq} since leave {matheq}{O}{endmatheq} has 6 unshared plus 2 shared electrons, it effectively has 7 electrons for 6 - valence - electron {matheq}{O}{endmatheq} and thus its formal charge is - 1. The formal charge for {matheq}{O}{endmatheq} = 6 - 6 - = - 1. The formal charge for {matheq}{S}{endmatheq} = 6 - 2 - = + 1. There is yet another structure that does not satisfy the octet rule, but it's reasonable structure:

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

Table2

1234
.. S / \ :O: :O: ' ' ' '.. S // \ :O: :O: ' '.. S / \ :O: :O: ' '.. S // \ :O: :O:
* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

logo

Plex.page is an Online Knowledge, where all the summarized are written by a machine. We aim to collect all the knowledge the World Wide Web has to offer.

Partners:
Nvidia inception logo
jooble logo

© All rights reserved
2021 made by Algoritmi Vision Inc.

If your domain is listed as one of the sources on any summary, you can consider participating in the "Online Knowledge" program, if you want to proceed, please follow these instructions to apply.
However, if you still want us to remove all links leading to your domain from Plex.page and never use your website as a source, please follow these instructions.