Advanced searches left 3/3
Search only database of 8 mil and more summaries

Lewis Glacier (Washington)

Summarized by PlexPage
Last Updated: 25 November 2020

* If you want to update the article please login/register

General | Latest Info

Lewis Glacier (Washington)

Coordinates483042N 1204750W / 48.51167N 120.79722W / 48.51167; -120.79722 Coordinates : 483042N 1204750W / 48.51167N 120.79722W / 48.51167; -120.79722
Length.20 mi (0.32 km)
LocationSkagit County, Washington , U.S.
StatusRetreating
TerminusTalus
TypeMountain glacier

Whitechuck GLacier supplies flow to the headwaters of the Whitechuck River. Its White expanse has graced these headwaters for thousands of years. Whitechuck GLacier retreated slowly from its advanced Little Ice Age position until 1930, while rapidly thinning. Thus, prepared to begin a rapid retreat in 1930. This rapid retreat culminated in the total disappearance of the North Branch of GLacier in 2001. No more do this GLacier dominate headwaters, and its demise has and will continue to alter the hydrology of Whitechuck River headwaters. How does this GLacier die and what is the impact when it disappear? Progressive temperature rise from 1880s to 1940s led to the ubiquitous retreat of North Cascade glaciers. Whitechuck GLacier was no exception: by 1950 glaciers northern terminus had retreated 1050 m and the southern terminus 750 m. More importantly, GLacier had thinned dramatically. A glacier had flowed down relatively gentle slopes into a large flat Basin. Between two termini, Lateral Moraine is plastered along the rim of the Basin at 2015 m, like a high water mark on a bathtub. Immediately beyond the current terminus, Point 2065 m was overridden by Ice indicating GLacier had thin by more than 60 m in the lower part of Whitechuck Basin. North Branch of Whitechuck GLacier in 1973 Neil Hinckley and 2006 USGS topographic maps of GLacier Peak from 1958 show still large Whitechuck GLacier with an area of 3. 1 km2. Whitechuck GLacier on this Map still has two branches with two termini, northern branch feeding the northern terminus, and the southern branch feeding both the northern and southern terminus. Both branches exceeded Mile in length in the 1950s. Figure 1: Map of Whitechuck GLacier with USGS 1988 Base Map that is Base on 1984 aerial photography. Terminus locations for 1880, 1950, 1988 and 2002 are indicate.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Planning and Logistics

The Lewis River fall hike definitely delivers on waterfalls. Glacial melt from Mount Adams feeds Lewis River and leads to stunning waterfall drops at lower, Middle and Upper Lewis River fall. Photographers, fisherman and those looking to take a dip in the river will be presented with dozens if not hundreds of options. Driving into Lower Lewis River fall from NF-90, youll find a large campground and toilet facilities. From this parking area to Lower Lewis River fall it is a short, 500-foot trek to vista overlooking 43-foot tall, 200-foot wide Lower Falls. Once youve taken in the views and taken some good photographs, continue following the Trail up along the Lewis River. Just before you hit Middle fall youll see a path that forks off along the Trail to Copper Creek Falls. This quarter mile hike off the main path is strongly recommended, as Copper Creek fall is surrounded by lush landscape and can be directly seen from Bridge crossing. Returning to the main path and heading up the river, youll reach a dramatic, 300-foot wide Middle fall that drops 33 feet over multiple tiers. Continuing up along the river, youll have yet another great destination to reach. Upper Lewis fall looks remarkably similar to Lower Lewis River fall, but it is even larger. With a 58-foot drop and 175-foot span, Upper Lewis River fall is the tallest of four major Falls on this section of river.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Overview

Note you can select to send to either free. Kindle. Com or kindle. Com variations. Free. Kindle. Com emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. Kindle. Com emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply. Observation of terminus behavior of 38 North Cascade glaciers, Washington, USA, since 1890 shows three different types of Glacier response: continuous retreat from Little Ice Age advance positions from 1890 to approximately 1950, followed by a period of advance from 1950 to 1976, and then retreat since 1976. Rapid retreat from 1890 to approximately 1950, slow retreat or equilibrium from 1950 to 1976, and moderate to rapid retreat since 1976. Continuous retreat from 1890 to the present. Type 1 glaciers are notable for steeper slopes, extensive crevassing and higher terminusregion velocities. Type 2 glaciers have intermediate velocities, moderate crevassing and intermediate slopes. Type 3 glaciers have low slopes, modest crevassing and low terminusregion velocities. This indicates that observed differences in response time and terminus behavior of North Cascade glaciers in reaction to climate change are related to variations in specific characteristics of glaciers. Response time is approximately 20-30 years on type 1 glaciers, 40-60 years on type 2 glaciers and a minimum of 60-100 years on type 3 glaciers. The high correlation in annual balance between North Cascade glaciers indicates that microclimates are not key to differences in behavior. Instead, it is physical characteristics slope, terminus velocity, thickness and accumulation rate of Glacier that determine recent terminus behavior and response time. The delay between onset of mass-balance change and initiation of noticeable change in terminus behavior has been observed on 21 glaciers to be 4-16 years. This initial response time applies to both positive and negative changes in mass balance.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Standard Route

Join Crew trek on this exciting outing to climb Mt Olympus looking for a Glacier mountaineering trip that is challenging, remote, and offers spectacular scenery? Ready to level up after climbing one of the easier routes on Mt Baker or Rainier? Well, consider climbing Mount Olympus in Washington State. This mountain may be little elevation-wise. But there is nothing puny about the approach, glaciers, crevasses, or icefalls youll encounter on route. A few times I looked around and felt like I was back in remote areas of Nepal. Mt. Olympus is the tallest peak in the Olympic Mountains and the fifth most prominent peak in Washington. This makes for some amazing views from the summit. It is also Washingtons third most isolated peak, so there are very few places you can actually view the mountain itself. The Paciffic Ocean is just 20 miles to the west-then, nothing else until Japan! Despite its relatively low elevation and latitude, Mount Olympus is heavily glaciate. Its largest glacier is Blue Glacier, which you will get quite intimate with when you climb. The standard route up Mount Olympus is a great mountaineering challenge that mixes Glacier travel, scrambling, snow climbing, and rock climbing. From your base camp at Glacier Meadows, youll also have a chance to view Blue Glacier, which is a true river of ice. It really blows away little pocket glaciers youll see in places like Glacier National Park.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Experience and Training

High-altitude mountaineering requires skills that can only be harvested on the unforgiving face of glaciated mountain. Learn skills necessary to cross gaping crevasses and climb to Summit Mount Rainier 14 411 feet under guidance of SummitClimb volunteer leaders, such as Dan Mazur. Members spend week with SummitClimb staff preparing gear, learning, and practicing Glacier Travel skills on Mt. Rainier National Park. This course is ideal for those looking to meet new climbing partners, practice skills, and learn both classic and modern techniques. We provide school free of charge in order to encourage people to join the climbing community and be inspired by mountains. We also want to get people who might already be familiar with the sport of mountaineering to come out and share their knowledge with group. This school serves as a steppingstone for perspective climbers to see how they feel at altitude and test out their equipment. Feel free to come out, ask lots of questions, meet and climb with expedition leaders of SummitClimb. Six days climbing with expedition leaders, including senior leader, Dan Mazur Clinics on self rescue, rope Travel, snow anchors, and crampon technique Use of group climbing equipment, like ropes, anchors, and tents Use of SummitClimbs stoves and cooking pots Summit attempt on Mt. Rainier ability to ask questions from experienced professionals and share your knowledge transportation to and from Olympia Washington Permits, National Forest entry fee, or camping fees Food and meals while on mountain and in town Travel insurance, mountain rescue, accident coverage Personal equipment and Glacier Travel equipment Day 1-Arrive at SEA-Tac International Airport and make your way to Olympia Washington. Members may choose to camp in the expedition leaders ' backyard / garden, or we can advise members on local hotel at their own expense. Day 2-We start the day with some coffee or tea, and then meet group for a mandatory meeting at 8: 30. After breakfast at a local cafe, expedition leaders will check members ' equipment and clothing. Next, group carpools up to Seattle where participants can buy, try out, or rent equipment at many reasonable priced shops like Ascent Outdoors or REI. We will finish the day with dinner at a local restaurant before making our way back to Olympia. Day 3-We pack our rucksacks and cars in Olympia and caravan to Mount Rainier National Park. Along the way, we will stop at grocery store for last minute food shopping. At the Park, we start by getting group gear and permits organize. After learning and practicing snow travel techniques, we will arrive at Glacial Moraine where we set up camp, cook dinner, and get a good nights rest for school the next day. Day 4-After early breakfast, we go over roping up and walking as a team on Glacier. We climb some of the hills surrounding camp and practice building snow anchors.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Hike Description

The Glaciers on Mount Olympus, with their terminal moraines at about 4 200 feet, are the lowest elevation glaciers at that latitude on the planet. The largest of these glaciers are White, Blue, and Hoh. While they are currently in retreat, they have exist because of the large amount of snowfall that area gets in winter. Surrounding forests, largest old growth Temperate Rain forests in the lower 48 States, get up to 170 inches of precipitation in year. On Hoh River Trail, you will be trekking through 15 miles of massive old-growth conifers as well as under gnarly, age big-leaf maples and red alders. The first 12 miles of the route is relatively flat, and the milky, Glacier-fed Hoh River is never far away. Then you will gain 3 000 feet over the next six miles to arrive at Blue Glacier Lateral Moraine. From this spot, vista opens up to the West Peak of Mount Olympus and the classic glacial cirque from which Blue Glacier issues. Most people do this a three-day backpack. There are numerous designated campsites in place along the route. On the first day, backpackers will hike in to Lewis Meadows or Elk Lake. On the second day, you can day hike to Blue Glacier Lateral Moraine and then backpack out, perhaps as far as Olympus Guard Station at Mile 9. 1 Then it easy walk out on the morning of the third day. The last major designated camping area that doesnt require Reservations is at Mile 10. 4. Above Lewis Meadows, there are single non-reserve Campsites at Mile 12. 4 13. 1 13. 2, and 13. 3 However, you may not want to take your chances with these on busy summer weekend; these camps also do not have bear wires. Higher Elevation Campsites at Martin Creek, Elk Lake, and Glacier Meadows Camp must be reserved on the day of your departure at Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center. Day hikers can decide how far they want to go. Turn around points include Mount Tom Creek Campsites at 2. 9 miles, Five Mile Island Campsites, Happy Four Shelter at 5. 7 miles, and Olympus Guard Station at 9. 1 miles. For short interpretive trails near the Visitor Center, see Hoh Rain Forest Loop Hike. Hoh River Trailhead is also Trailhead for three short trails at Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center: Mini Trail, Spruce Trail, and Hall of Mosses Trail. Pass main kiosk, and reach Junction with Hall of Mosses Trail. Bear right and cross Taft Creek on a footbridge. At Junction with Spruce Trail, go leave on Hoh River Trail. Youll be keeping to this Trail for the next 17. 5 miles until you reach Glacier Meadows Camp. Hike along under towering canopy of huge Sitka Spruce and gnarly moss-drape big-leaf maples. The lush understory is compose of wood fern, lady fern, and red huckleberry.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

logo

Plex.page is an Online Knowledge, where all the summaries are written by a machine. We aim to collect all the knowledge the World Wide Web has to offer.

Partners:
Nvidia inception logo

© All rights reserved
2021 made by Algoritmi Vision Inc.

If you believe that any of the summaries on our website lead to misinformation, don't hesitate to contact us. We will immediately review it and remove the summaries if necessary.

If your domain is listed as one of the sources on any summary, you can consider participating in the "Online Knowledge" program, if you want to proceed, please follow these instructions to apply.
However, if you still want us to remove all links leading to your domain from Plex.page and never use your website as a source, please follow these instructions.