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Lower Triglycerides Levels

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Last Updated: 02 July 2021

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General | Latest Info

Maybe you 've been eating fast food more often than you should, or you are not getting your recommended two - and - half hours of exercise each week. Or, it could be that you smoke, or your blood pressure is too high. Well, for whatever reason, you may be concerned about your risk of getting heart disease. Well, few tests can help you learn that risk, so you can start making healthy lifestyle changes to reduce it. Coronary risk profile is a group of blood tests that measure your cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Why is it important to know these levels? Because if you have too many of these substances in your blood from eating foods like burgers and French fries, they can clog your arteries. Eventually, your arteries can become so clogged that you 'll have a heart attack or stroke. Men should have their cholesterol test by the time they re 35. Women should have it checked by age 45. If you have condition like diabetes, heart disease, stroke, or high blood pressure, have your cholesterol checked now, no matter what your age. To measure your cholesterol, your doctor will give you a blood test. If you are also having your triglyceride level check, you may be told not to eat or drink anything for 8 to 12 hours before the test. Depending upon your heart risk, doctor may measure just your total cholesterol level, or your total cholesterol along with your LDL, or bad cholesterol, HDL, or good cholesterol, and triglycerides. If you have an average risk of getting heart disease, your goal is to have total cholesterol of less than 200 milligrams per deciliter, LDL cholesterol lower than 130 milligrams per deciliter, HDL cholesterol higher than 40 milligrams per deciliter if you re men or 50 if you re women - higher better, and triglycerides of less than 150 also, lower better. Although some illnesses, like arthritis, can raise your cholesterol level, generally having high cholesterol means that you re at increased risk for heart disease and stroke. It's sign you need to work harder to keep your heart healthy. If your cholesterol levels are normal, that's great! That means that you are eating right, you are exercising, and you are taking good care of your health. You don't need to have another cholesterol test for about five years. But if your cholesterol level is high, or you 've already got heart disease, high blood pressure, or diabetes, you 'll need to have your cholesterol levels checked more often. Keeping close tabs on your cholesterol and triglyceride levels is one way that you can take charge of your health, and change it for the better. High triglyceride levels may be due to: Cirrhosis or liver damage, diet low in protein and high in carbohydrates, Underactive thyroid Nephrotic syndrome, other medicines, such as female hormones, Poorly controlled diabetes Disorder pass down through families in which there are high amounts of cholesterol and triglycerides in the blood. Overall, treatment of elevated triglyceride levels focuses on increased exercise and changes in diet.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Eat the Right Fat

Triglycerides are a type of fat in the blood. High levels of triglycerides can increase your risk for heart disease. Luckily, same dietary recommendations that are advised for a number of other conditions such as losing weight, being physically active and limiting refined carbohydrates can also help lower triglycerides. When too many calories are eat, body stores them as triglycerides for use at later time, but when triglyceride levels become too high, they may increase the risk for heart disease. Normal triglyceride levels are considered to be below 150 mg / dL whereas levels above 200 mg / dL are high. For many, healthy level can be achieved through following lifestyle changes.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

What are triglycerides?

Table

CategoryTriglcyeride Level
NormalLess than 150mg/dL
Borderline high150 to 199 mg/dL
High200 to 499 mg/dL
Very high500 mg/dL and above

You know what change you need to make, and youve put together a game plan to make it happen. So, how long will it actually take to see a change in your triglyceride levels? As you might have guess, there is no One - size - fit - all answer. And change might come more slowly than you like. In general, lowering your triglycerides naturally can take 3 to 6 months. The amount of time it takes to get your triglycerides back into healthy range depends on how HIGH they were to begin with, kinds of changes youre implementing, and your individual heart health risk factors. Dont get discouraged If your numbers are where you want them to be first time you get them retested. You may just need to keep up good work a little longer.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Topic Overview

Triglycerides are a type of fat found in your blood. Your body uses them for energy. You need some triglycerides for good health. But high triglycerides might raise your risk of heart disease and may be a sign of metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is a combination of high blood pressure, high blood sugar, too much fat around the waist, low HDL cholesterol, and high triglycerides. Metabolic syndrome increases your risk for heart disease, diabetes, and stroke. Blood tests that measure your cholesterol also measure your triglycerides. For general idea about your triglycerides level, compare your test results to following: footnote 1 normal is less than 150. The borderline - high is 150 to 199. High is 200 to 499. Very high is 500 or higher.


Symptoms

High triglycerides by themselves do not cause symptoms. If your high triglycerides are caused by a genetic condition, you may have visible fatty deposits under skin called xanthomas. In rare cases, people who have very high triglyceride levels may develop inflammation of the pancreas, which can cause sudden, severe abdominal pain, loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting, and fever. If you have high triglycerides, you may also have high cholesterol. In many cases, people don't know that they have high triglycerides until they have a blood test called lipoprotein analysis to check their cholesterol levels. If your triglyceride levels are high, your doctor will also check for and treat other associated conditions that may be linked to high triglycerides. These conditions include diabetes, hypothyroidism, kidney disease, and metabolic syndrome.


Treatment Overview

If you have not previously been taking medicines for high triglycerides, you should probably start. If you have been taking medicines but they have not been effective, your doctor may change your dosage or add new medicines. Medicines that you might take are: fibrates. Nicotinic acid. Omega - 3 fatty acids. Statins. If you are taking statin,s you need to be extra careful if you are also taking fibrate medicines. There is a greater risk of life - threatening muscle problem called rhabdomyolysis, which can lead to kidney failure. Before you can take this combination of medicines, your kidneys and liver must be healthy and functioning normally. If you have any muscle problems or pain, report it immediately to your doctor.


What Are Triglycerides?

Triglycerides are composed of glycerol molecules bound to three fatty acids and are digested by pancreatic lipase. Triglycerides are a major component of very - low - density lipoprotein and serve as a source of energy. They are broken down in the intestine, absorbed by intestinal cells, and combined with cholesterol and proteins to form chylomicrons that are transported in lymph to the bloodstream. Triglycerides are measured using enzymatic reagents, including lipase, glycerol kinase, and glycerol - 3phosphate oxidase linked to the peroxidase - chromogen detection system. Triglycerides comprise three fatty acids esterify with glycerol backbone. Triacylglycerols is the correct chemical name, but they are more commonly known as triglycerides and this term will be used throughout this chapter. Triglycerides are major dietary fat. They are hydrolyse in the gut by lipases to fatty acids and monoglycerides. Monoglycerides undergo re - esterification in enterocytes and subsequent incorporation into chylomicrons. Major sites of endogenous triglyceride synthesis are liver and adipose tissue. In normal circumstances, hepatic triglyceride is secreted in very low density lipoproteins. In certain pathological states, triglycerides accumulate in hepatocytes, leading to hepatic steatosis. Adipose tissue triglycerides represent the major energy store of the body. Fatty acids are mobilized from adipose tissue triglycerides by action of hormone - sensitive lipase, which is activated by glucagon and adrenaline and inhibited by insulin.


Why Are High Triglycerides Bad?

Very high levels of triglycerides are associated with liver and pancreas problems. But studies show conflicting results on the role of high triglycerides and the risk of heart disease. Not all experts agree that triglycerides play a significant role in heart problems. High triglycerides tend to show up along with other problems, like high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, high levels of bad LDL cholesterol, and low levels of good HDL cholesterol. So it is hard to know for sure which problems are caused by high triglycerides alone. For instance, some people have genetic condition that seem to cause high triglyceride levels. But they do have an increased risk of heart disease. Still, there is some evidence that high triglycerides, on their own, increase the risk of disease. Other studies show that high triglycerides may only play a minor role when other heart disease risks are taken into account. With ongoing studies, scientists hope to find out whether drugs that lower triglycerides also reduce risks of heart disease. Overall, it's important to remember that improving diet and lifestyle will lower triglycerides and lower the overall risk of heart and blood vessel problems.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Cause

The most common causes of high triglycerides are obesity and poorly controlled diabetes. If you are overweight and are not active, you may have high triglycerides, especially if you eat a lot of carbohydrate or sugary foods or drink a lot of alcohol. Binge drinking of alcohol can cause dangerous spikes in triglyceride levels that can trigger inflammation of the pancreas. Other causes of high triglycerides include hypothyroidism, Kidney disease, and certain inherited lipid disorders. Estrogen therapy, which may be used for menopause symptoms, may also raise triglyceride levels. Certain medicines may also raise triglycerides. These medicines include: tamoxifen. Steroids. Beta - blockers. Diuretics. Birth control pills. High triglycerides rarely occur on their own. They are usually associated with other conditions. High triglycerides are part of metabolic syndrome, group of medical problems that increase your risk of heart attack, stroke, and diabetes. Metabolic syndrome include: high triglycerides. Low HDL cholesterol. High blood pressure. High blood sugar. Too much fat, especially around the waist.


Why Are High Triglycerides Bad?

Triglycerides are a kind of fat found in the blood. Cholesterol is another kind. Store in fat cells for later use, Triglycerides are a major energy source. Normal amounts are important for good health. Eating more fat than body burns can lead to high triglyceride levels. High triglyceride levels may result in hardening of arteries, which increases risks of stroke, heart attack, and heart disease. They can be part of metabolic syndrome, which also includes too much fat around the waist, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and abnormal cholesterol levels. Sometimes high triglyceride levels mean poorly controlled type 2 diabetes, low thyroid hormone levels, liver or kidney disease, or rare genetic conditions.


What could cause low triglycerides?

Low triglyceride levels are generally not dangerous. In fact, research supports the idea that low triglyceride levels can offer certain health benefits. In one 2014 study, researchers found that lower non - fasting triglyceride levels were associated with a reduction in all - cause mortality in almost 14 000 study participants. Another smaller 2017 study found that low triglyceride levels were linked to improving brain function in older adults without dementia. However, incredibly low triglyceride levels may be linked to other conditions, as mentioned above. Some of these conditions in and of themselves may be dangerous, so it has become important to treat underlying conditions that cause low triglycerides.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Symptoms

Triglyceride levels

NormalLess than 150 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)
Borderline-high150 to 199 mg/dL
High200 to 499 mg/dL
Very high500 mg/dL or higher

Triglycerides are fats that circulate in your blood. When you eat fatty foods, most of the fat is in the form of triglycerides. When you eat too many calories, extra calories are converted to triglycerides and stored away inside your body's fat cells. Most people find out they have high or very high triglycerides from a blood test. Triglycerides are checked along with total cholesterol, good cholesterol, and bad cholesterol. These are all lipids and the combined blood test is called lipid profile. One reason it's important to have a lipid profile is that there are usually no symptoms associated with high cholesterol or high triglycerides, condition called hyperlipidemia. You could have very high triglycerides and not know it. You have very high triglycerides if your level is 500 milligrams per deciliter or higher. Very high triglycerides can lead to dangerous swelling of your pancreas called pancreatitis. You can also have swelling of your liver, increasing your risk of stroke and heart attack, and even get fat deposits under your skin. Here are some warning signs: xanthomas. Fatty deposits beneath skin are called xanthomas. They can be very small or as wide as three inches or more. They can be any shape and may have yellow or orange color. Xanthomas can be a warning sign of very high cholesterol or triglycerides. They are common over joints like elbows and knees, or on hands, ankles, back and buttocks. Xanthelasmas are fatty deposits that can occur on your eyelids. Xanthomas are not dangerous but can be unsightly. They may go away once triglyceride levels are lower. Pancreatitis. Another warning sign of very high triglycerides is a condition called acute pancreatitis. Symptoms include sudden severe belly pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, rapid heartbeat, and rapid breathing. Alcohol can trigger attack of pancreatitis, and if you have high triglycerides, alcohol can shoot them up even higher. Other warning signs. You may also get swelling and pain in your liver or spleen. Very high triglycerides may cause blocking of blood supply to your heart or your brain. Symptoms of decreased blood supply to your heart could include chest pain. Decrease blood supply to your brain could cause numbness, dizziness, confusion, blurred vision, or severe headache. With triglyceride levels above 4 000 mg / dL, your doctor may notice some changes on your eye exam. Finally, memory loss has been associated with some conditions causing elevated triglycerides. Remember that you may have no warning signs for high triglycerides or even very high triglycerides, so it's best to have a lipid blood test to find out about your cholesterol levels and your triglycerides. The National Cholesterol Education Program advises that everyone have a lipid profile every five years starting at age 20. If you have any warning signs of very high triglycerides, talk to your doctor. If your blood test shows high triglycerides, you may be able to lower them with diet and exercise. If you have very high triglycerides, you will probably need medication along with diet and exercise.


Why Are High Triglycerides Bad?

Lipids, also referred to as fats, are one of three macronutrients that are an essential part of diet. There are various types of lipids, including steroids, phospholipids, and triglycerides. Triglycerides are a type of lipid that the body can use for both immediate and store energy. When you eat a meal, your body uses nutrients from that meal as energy or fuel. However, if you eat meal with too much energy, this excess energy gets converted into triglycerides. These triglycerides are stored in fat cells for use at later time. The most common concern about triglycerides is high triglyceride levels. High levels of triglycerides in blood may contribute to atherosclerosis, clogging and hardening of arteries. Because of this, high triglyceride levels may increase your risk of heart disease, heart attack, or stroke. Low triglyceride levels may be a health concern as well. Lets look at how low triglycerides may affect your health and how to prevent and treat related problems.


What could cause low triglycerides?

The best treatment for low triglycerides is to find and treat the underlying cause. For some conditions, such as malnutrition, it may be as simple as making dietary changes. For other conditions, such as malabsorption and hyperthyroidism, medication and lifestyle changes may be necessary. If low triglyceride levels are the result of not getting enough fat in diet, here are some suggestions for healthy dietary practices: total dietary fat intake should be anywhere from 20 - 35 percent of total calories for average person not on a low - fat diet. Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats should make up the majority of fat consumed in diet, as these are the most heart - healthy. Saturate fats and cholesterol should be limit, and artificial trans fats should never be consume.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

Triglyceride levels footnote 2

NormalLess than 1.7 millimoles per litre (mmol/L)
Borderline-high1.7 to 2.1 mmol/L
High2.2 to 5.4 mmol/L
Very high5.5 mmol/L or higher
* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

1. Lose Some Weight

About 25 percent of adults in the US have elevated triglycerides - type OF fat found in their blood. Triglycerides supply YOUR body with energy, but having too many triglycerides in YOUR blood can INCREASE YOUR risk of heart disease. Obesity, uncontrolled diabetes, REGULAR ALCOHOL use and high - calorie DIET can all contribute TO high blood triglyceride levels. 1. Lose SOME WEIGHT Research has shown that losing even modest five to 10 percent OF YOUR body WEIGHT can decrease blood triglycerides and have a lasting effect, even if you regain SOME OF WEIGHT. 2. Limit SUGAR INTAKE ADD SUGAR is a big part of many people's diets. The American Heart Association recommends consuming no more than six TO nine teaspoons OF Added SUGAR per day. Hidden SUGAR commonly lurks in sweets, soft drinks and fruit juice. 3. Follow LOW - CARB DIET Much like added SUGAR, extra carbs in YOUR DIET are converted into triglycerides and stored in fat cells. A 2006 study found those who ate LOW - CARB DIET providing about 26 percent of calories from carbs had greater drops in blood triglyceride levels than those given higher - CARB diets. 4. Eat MORE FIBER Including MORE FIBER in YOUR DIET can decrease absorption OF fat and SUGAR in YOUR small intestine, helping TO lower the number OF triglycerides in YOUR blood. Fiber is found in fruits, vegetables and whole grains, NUTS, cereals and legumes. 5. Exercise REGULARLY Good HDL cholesterol has an inverse relationship with blood triglycerides, meaning that high levels of HDL cholesterol can help lower triglycerides. Aerobic EXERCISE can INCREASE levels OF HDL cholesterol in YOUR blood and, when paired with WEIGHT loss, is especially effective at decreasing triglycerides. 6. Avoid TRANS FATS Artificial TRANS FATS are type of fat that ADD TO process foods TO INCREASE their shelf life. Trans FATS are commonly found in commercially fried foods and baked goods made with partially hydrogenate oils. Due TO their inflammatory properties, TRANS FATS have been attributed to many health problems, including INCREASE bad LDL cholesterol levels, INCREASE triglyceride levels and heart disease. 7. Eat FATTY FISH TWICE WEEKLY FATTY FISH is well known for its benefits for heart health and ability TO lower blood triglycerides. This is mostly due to its content of omega - 3 FATTY acids, type OF polyunsaturated FATTY acid that is considered essential, meaning you need TO get it through YOUR DIET. Both Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the American Heart Association recommend eating two servings of FATTY FISH per week. 8. Increase YOUR INTAKE OF UNSATURATED FATS Studies show that monounsaturated and polyunsaturated FATS can reduce blood triglyceride levels, especially when they are replaced other types of fat. Monounsaturated FATS are found in foods like olive oil, NUTS and avocados. Polyunsaturated FATS are present in vegetable oils and FATTY FISH. 9. Establish REGULAR MEAL PATTERN After you EAT MEAL, cells in YOUR pancreas send signal TO release insulin into the bloodstream. Insulin is then responsible for transporting glucose TO YOUR cells TO be used for energy.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

2. Limit Your Sugar Intake

If you 've been told you have high triglycerides - too much fat in your bloodstream - you are not alone. It's estimated that one in four Canadians has unhealthy triglyceride level, which is linked with heart disease, heart attack, stroke and diabetes. Good news: High triglycerides, in large part, can be corrected through diet, weight loss and physical activity. According to a scientific statement issued this month by the American Heart Association, lifestyle changes can lower blood triglycerides by as much as 50 per cent. Researchers come to this conclusion after analyzing more than 500 international studies from the past 30 years. Triglycerides are a type of fat carried in the blood. When you eat, calories that are not needed right away are converted to triglycerides and store. When you need energy between meals, hormones prompt fat cells to release triglycerides into the bloodstream. You can have excessive levels of triglycerides in your bloodstream if you regularly eat more calories than you need - especially sugar and fat calories. High triglycerides are thought to contribute to hardening and thickening of artery walls, and, as result, increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Studies suggest that elevated triglycerides are more strongly tied to heart risk in people with lower levels of HDL cholesterol and in those with Type 2 diabetes. Obesity, lack of exercise, poor diet and alcohol consumption can increase blood triglycerides. High triglycerides also occur in people with poorly controlled diabetes and kidney disease. Triglycerides are measured as part of lipid panel, series of blood tests that measure triglycerides as well as major forms of cholesterol. You 'll be asked to fast for 12 hours for accurate measurement. The normal triglyceride result is less than 1. 7 millimoles per litre of blood; borderline high 1. 8 to 2. 2 mmol / L; High 2. 3 to 5. 6 mmol / L; very high 5. 7 mmol / L and above. Although the normal cutoff for triglycerides is set at 1. 7 mmol / L, AHA is recommending a new optimal level of less than 1. 13 mmol / L. Many people with elevated triglycerides can reduce their level without medication. However, people with very high triglycerides generally require medication since high levels may cause pancreatitis. The following strategies can help you significantly lower blood triglycerides and reduce your future risk for heart disease. If you are overweight, cutting calories can lower triglycerides. Study after study has demonstrated that triglycerides are markedly affected by body weight and body fat. People with normal weight are far more likely to have healthy triglyceride levels than those who are overweight or obese. Having excess fat stored around the abdomen is also related to higher triglyceride levels. Bmi is calculated by dividing your weight in kilograms by your height in metres square. You can use an online calculator to determine your BMI. Too much sugar and too many refined starchy foods can increase triglycerides. Added sugars are found in soft drinks and sweets and also surprising number of everyday foods such as breakfast cereals, salad dressings, frozen dinners, pasta sauces, soy milk - even peanut butter and bread.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

3. Follow a Low-Carb Diet

Table

OptimalLess than 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)
NormalLess than 150 mg/dL
Borderline-high150 to 199 mg/dL
High200 to 499 mg/dL
Very high500 mg/dL or higher

Improving triglyceride levels is simple. From a dietary perspective, all you have to do is do two things: eat fewer carbs and eat more marine - derive omega 3s. The best way to do this is by implementing a Mediterranean - style ketogenic diet. To follow this diet correctly, you must: restrict carbohydrates Eat plenty of nuts, olives / olive oil, low - carb vegetables, and fatty fish like sardines and salmon. Restrict calories to lose weight, implement a sleep schedule and improve sleep quality. Exercise for at least 30 minutes a day Supplement with marine - derive omega 3s, curcumin, niacin, and / or garlic extract Eat more MCTs from coconut oil or MCT oil Supplement Avoid alcohol, trans fats, and add sugar however, even IF you implement these triglyceride lowering suggestions flawlessly, you will only know IF they work by getting blood test.


What Are Triglycerides?

A Triglyceride is a type of fat, or lipid, found in your blood. Specifically, triglycerides are made up of three fatty acids bind by glycerol molecule. When your body needs to store fat, it is stored as triglyceride.S When your body needs to transport fat, it transports as triglyceride.S Think of triglycerides as SUV of fats. Multi - purpose vehicle. These vehicles store and transport energy throughout your body. To access this energy, you break apart triglyceride,s then use fatty acids within to produce energy, or ATP. But if you eat lots of carbs and sugar, you will break apart many triglycerides. Instead, youll be storing them.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

5. Exercise Regularly

Table

OptimalLess than 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL)
NormalLess than 150 mg/dL
Borderline-high150 to 199 mg/dL
High200 to 499 mg/dL
Very high500 mg/dL or higher

High - fat meals may not be quite as bad for your body if you exercise shortly afterward, small study from Japan suggest. Results show that walking and doing light resistance training one hour after eating high - fat meal reduces boost in triglycerides, fats in the blood, normally seen after consuming this type of food. What's more, exercising after eating does a better job of reducing elevations in triglyceride levels than exercising before meal. High levels of triglycerides can increase the risk of Heart Disease. Regular exercise reduces triglyceride levels, but few studies have looked at the effect of exercise on triglyceride levels shortly after eating, researchers say. However, because the study was small, further research is needed to know whether results apply to the general population, researchers add. In fact, study published in 1998, found opposite that exercising 10 to 12 hours before a high - fat meal was best at reducing triglyceride increases, although exercising afterward does show some benefit as well. Stephen Ball, associate professor of nutrition and exercise physiology at University of Missouri, and author of a 1998 study, says the best time to exercise is any time you can. And if you want to lose weight, you 'll have to exercise enough to burn more calories than you consume, Ball note. In a new study, researchers measured triglyceride levels in 10 men and women after they had eaten fatty meal. On two separate days, people exercised either one hour before or one hour after eating a meal. On the third day, people do not exercise after eating. When people do exercise, their triglyceride levels rise from 66 milligrams per deciliter to 172 mg / dL two hours after eating. Normal fasting triglyceride levels are below 150 mg / dL. When people exercise before dining, their triglyceride levels increase to 148 mg / dL within two hours after eating. When people exercise after eating a meal, their triglyceride levels increase to 131 mg / dL six hours after eating a high - fat meal, all participants triglyceride levels were about the same, regardless of whether or not they had exercise. However, even temporary increases in triglyceride levels after eating high - fat meals may increase cardiovascular disease risk, researchers say. Exercising after fatty meals may accelerate the rate at which the body uses fat, thus reducing triglyceride levels, researchers say. Maybe there is a reason that it is good to go for a walk after a big meal, like Thanksgiving, says Dr. William Kraus, professor of Medicine at Duke University School of Medicine, who was not involved in the research. The study, conducted by researchers at Kyoto Prefectural University, is published in the February issue of the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. Pass it on: Exercising one hour after eating a high - fat meal reduces elevations in triglyceride levels. Follow Rachael Rettner on Twitter RachaelRettner, or MyHealthNewsDaily MyHealth_MHND. We re also on Facebook & Google +.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

6. Avoid Trans Fats

Trans fats are created in an industrial process that adds hydrogen to liquid vegetable oils to make them more solid. Another name for trans fats is partially hydrogenate oils. Trans fats raise your bad cholesterol levels and lower your good cholesterol levels. These changes are associated with a higher risk of heart disease. Trans fats are found in many fried foods. Bake goods, such as pastries, pizza dough, pie crust, cookies and crackers also can also contain trans fats. Since 2006, FDA has required trans fat content to be listed on the Nutrition Facts panel of packaged foods. In recent years, many major national fast - food chains and casual - dining restaurant chains have announced that they will no longer use trans fats to fry or deep - fry foods. The American Heart Association recommends that adults who would benefit from lowering LDL cholesterol eliminate trans Fat from their diet. To find the amount of trans fats in particular package food, look at the Nutrition Facts panel. Companies must list any measurable amount of trans fat in a separate line in the Total Fat section of the panel, directly beneath the line for Saturated Fat. This means if a food package states 0 grams of trans fats, it might still have some trans fats if the amount per serving is less than 0. 5 g. Make sure to check the ingredients list for partially hydrogenate oil.


Dangers of high triglyceride levels

It is easy to find out your triglyceride levels. Your doctor can determine them with a simple blood test. They are usually measured whenever your doctor conducts a blood test called lipid profile, which measures your total cholesterol level, HDL level, LDL level, and triglyceride level. The American Heart Association recommends that everyone older than 20 have their lipid profile checked at least every 4 to 6 years. If your levels are elevate, you may need to be tested more often. It is normal for triglyceride levels to be high after you eat. For this reason, doctors recommend waiting 12 hours after eating or drinking to have your triglyceride levels test. Other factors that may affect triglyceride level test results include blood alcohol levels, menstrual cycle, recent exercise and time of day, according to Cleveland Clinic.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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