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Mean Insulin Levels Are High

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Last Updated: 02 July 2021

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General | Latest Info

Insulin is a hormone produced by beta cells of the pancreas. These cells are scattered throughout the pancreas in small clusters known as islets of Langerhans. Insulin produce is released into the blood stream and travels throughout the body. Insulin is an essential hormone that has many actions within the body. Most actions of insulin are direct to metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins. Insulin also regulates the functions of the body's cells, including their growth. Insulin is critical for the body's use of glucose as energy. Insulin resistance is a condition in which the body's cells become resistant to the effects of insulin. That is, normal response to the amount of insulin is reduce. As a result, higher levels of insulin are needed in order for insulin to have its proper effects, and the pancreas compensates by trying to produce more insulin. This resistance occurs in response to the body's own insulin or when insulin is administered by injection. With insulin resistance, pancreas produces more and more insulin until the pancreas can no longer produce sufficient insulin for the body's demands, and then blood sugar rises. Insulin resistance is a risk factor for development of DIABETES and heart disease. Type 2 DIABETES mellitus is a type of DIABETES that occurs later in life or with Obesity at any age. Insulin resistance precedes development of type 2 DIABETES, sometimes by years. In individuals who will ultimately develop type 2 DIABETES, research shows that blood glucose and insulin levels are normal for many years, until at some point in time, insulin resistance develop. High insulin levels are often associated with central Obesity, cholesterol abnormalities, and / or high blood pressure. When these disease processes occur together, it is called metabolic Syndrome. One action of insulin is to cause the body's cells to remove and use glucose from blood. This is one way by which insulin controls the level of glucose in the blood. Insulin has this effect on cells by binding to insulin receptors on the surface of cells. You can think of it as insulin knocking on doors of muscle and fat cells. Cells hear knock, open up, and let glucose in to be used With insulin resistance, muscles don't hear knock. So the pancreas is notified it needs to make more insulin, which increases the level of insulin in the blood and causes louder knock. Resistance of cells continues to increase over time. As long as the pancreas is able to produce enough insulin to overcome this resistance, blood glucose levels remain normal. When the pancreas can no longer produce enough insulin, blood glucose levels begin to rise. Initially, this happens after meals-when glucose levels are at their highest and more insulin is needed eventually while fasting too. When blood sugar rises abnormally above certain levels, type 2 DIABETES is present.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

What Is Insulin Resistance?

Insulin resistance is a condition in which the body produces insulin but does not use it properly. Insulin, hormone made by the pancreas, helps the body use glucose for energy. Glucose is a form of sugar that is the body's main source of energy. The body's digestive system breaks food down into glucose, which then travels in the bloodstream to cells throughout the body. Glucose in Blood is called Blood glucose, also know as Blood sugar. As blood glucose level rises after meal, pancreas releases insulin to help cells take in and use glucose. When people are insulin resistant, their muscle, fat, and liver cells do not respond properly to insulin. As a result, their bodies need more insulin to help glucose enter cells. Pancreas tries to keep up with this increasing demand for insulin by producing more. Eventually, pancreas fails to keep up with the body's need for insulin. Excess glucose builds up in the bloodstream, setting the stage for Diabetes. Many people with insulin resistance have high levels of both glucose and insulin circulating in their blood at the same time. Insulin resistance increases the chance of developing type 2 Diabetes and heart disease. Learning about insulin resistance is the first step toward making lifestyle changes that can help prevent Diabetes and other health problems.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

What should your numbers be?

Hyperglycemia means high glucose in the blood. Your body needs glucose to properly function. Your cells rely on glucose for energy. Hyperglycemia is a defining characteristic of diabeteswhen blood glucose level is too high because the body isn't properly using or doesn't make the hormone Insulin. Eating too many processed foods may cause your blood sugar to rise. You get glucose from foods you eat. Carbohydrates, such as fruit, milk, potatoes, bread, and rice, are the biggest sources of glucose in the typical diet. Your body breaks down carbohydrates into glucose, and then transports glucose to cells via the bloodstream. The body needs Insulin. However, in order to use glucose, your body needs Insulin. This is a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin Help transport glucose into cells, particularly muscle cells. People with Type 1 Diabetes no longer make Insulin to help their bodies use glucose, so they have to take Insulin, which is injected under the skin. People with Type 2 Diabetes may have enough Insulin, but their body doesn't use it well; they're Insulin resistant. Some people with Type 2 Diabetes may not produce enough Insulin. People with Diabetes may become Hyperglycemic if they don't keep their blood glucose level under control. For example, if someone with Type 1 Diabetes doesn't take enough Insulin before eating, glucose their body makes from that food can build up in their blood and lead to Hyperglycemia. Your endocrinologist will tell you what your target blood glucose levels are. Your levels may be different from what is usually considered as normal because of age, pregnancy, and / or other factors. Fasting Hyperglycemia is defined as when you don't eat for at least eight hours. The recommended range without Diabetes is 70 to 130mg / dL. If your blood glucose level is above 130mg / dL, that's fasting Hyperglycemia. Fasting Hyperglycemia is a common Diabetes complication. Postprandial or reactive Hyperglycemia occurs after eating. During this type of Hyperglycemia, your liver doesn't stop sugar production, as it normally would directly after meal, and stores glucose as glycogen. If your postprandial blood glucose level is above 180mg / dL, that's postprandial or reactive Hyperglycemia. However, it's not just people with Diabetes who can develop Hyperglycemia. Certain medications and illnesses can cause it, including beta blockers, steroids, and bulimia. This article will focus on Hyperglycemia caused by Diabetes. Early Hyperglycemia Symptoms Early Symptoms of Hyperglycemia, or High blood glucose, may serve as warning even before you test your glucose level. Typical Symptoms may include: increased thirst and / or hunger Frequent urination Sugar in Your urine Headache blur Vision Fatigue Many symptoms of ketoacidosis are similar to Hyperglycemia. Hallmarks of ketoacidosis are: High level of ketones in urine Shortness of breath Fruit-smelling breath Dry mouth additionally, stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, and confusion may accompany ketoacidosis. Immediate medical attention is highly recommended if you have any of these symptoms. Some people with Diabetes are instructed by their doctor to regularly test ketone levels. Ketone testing is performed two ways: using urine or using blood.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

How to lower insulin level

Prolong use of external Insulin or its high levels in the blood can have certain side effects on different body parts, as discussed below Hypoglycemia-this is a major side effect of high Insulin levels in your blood. It occurs in nearly 16% of Type 1 diabetic patients and 10% of Type 2 diabetic patients. Severe Hypoglycemia can result in sweating, tachycardia, confusion, seizures, coma, and even death in extreme cases. Therefore, regular glucose monitoring is recommended for diabetic patients receiving Insulin therapy. Hypersensitivity reactions-It occur only in 1% of people taking either biosynthetic human Insulin or pork Insulin. Reactions include local erythema, heat, swelling or nodule formation. Desensitization kits are available for patients with true allergy to Insulin. Cardiovascular consequences-Insulin can cause hypertension by stimulating the nervous system to retain sodium. It may also induce imbalance in blood fats. Insulin may also increase the heart rate if Hypoglycemia has not occur. Weight gain-sudden restoration of control over blood glucose levels in diabetic patients treated with Insulin causes weight gain. This is due to increased use of glucose or calories. Metabolic side effects-People treated for diabetic ketoacidosis may have low levels of phosphates, potassium, and magnesium in their blood. Kidney functioning-Hypoglycemia caused by Hyperinsulinemia can lead to a decrease in blood flow to kidneys and thus reduce filtration rate. It also increases excretion of urinary albumin. These changes are reversible if Hypoglycemia can be manage. Blood flow-Hyperinsulinemia can decrease blood volume and increase its viscosity. This can predispose patient to low peripheral perfusion. Gastrointestinal disturbances-Rarely Hyperinsulinemia can lead to gastrointestinal distress which can be resolved by lowering the Insulin dose. Visual disturbances-blur vision can also occur, which is self-limit. Lung-Both lung structure and function get affected by high levels of Insulin. This is of concern especially in Indians who are found to have the lowest lung function globally.


What is Insulin Resistance?

Insulin Resistance is a condition wherein cells in your body do respond correctly to insulin. Without insulin, your body ca access nutrients in your bloodstream which triggers elevated glucose levels. Those levels, in turn, tell the body to make more insulin and thus the cycle of insulin resistance is born. While insulin resistance can happen to anyone, people with type 2 diabetes, have an 83% chance of struggling with insulin resistance. If you also have high blood pressure and high blood lipid levels, probability of insulin resistance soars even higher, up to 95%. Those percentages make this no small matter!

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Collection and Panels

Random Blood Sugar Test

ResultA1C TestFasting Blood Sugar TestGlucose Tolerance TestRandom Blood Sugar Test
Diabetes6.5% or above126 mg/dL or above200 mg/dL or above200 mg/dL or above
Prediabetes5.7 - 6.4%100 - 125 mg/dL140 - 199 mg/dLN/A
NormalBelow 5.7%99 mg/dL or below140 mg/dL or belowN/A

A Reference range for your tests can be found in your laboratory report. They are typically found to be right of your results. If you DO not have your lab report, consult your healthcare provider or laboratory that perform Test to obtain Reference range. Laboratory test results are not meaningful by themselves. Their meaning comes from comparison to Reference Ranges. Reference ranges are values expected for a healthy person. They are sometimes call normal values. By comparing your test results with reference values, you and your healthcare provider can see if any of your test results fall outside the range of expected values. Values that are outside expect ranges can provide clues to help identify possible conditions or diseases. While the accuracy of laboratory testing has significantly evolved over the past few decades, some lab-to-lab variability can occur due to differences in testing equipment, chemical reagents, and techniques. This is the reason why so few Reference Ranges are provided on this site. It is important to know that you must use the range supplied by the laboratory that performs your test to evaluate whether your results are within normal limits. For more information, please read the article Reference range and What They Mean. Insulin is a hormone that is produced and stored in beta cells of the pancreas. It is secrete in response to elevated blood Glucose following meal and is vital for transportation and storage of Glucose, body's main source of energy. Insulin helps transport glucose from blood to within cells, thus helping regulate blood glucose levels, and has a role in lipid metabolism. This test measures the amount of Insulin in the blood. Insulin and glucose blood levels must be in balance. After meal, carbohydrates usually are broken down into glucose and other simple sugars. These are absorbed in the blood, causing blood glucose levels to rise, which in turn stimulates the pancreas to release Insulin into the blood. As glucose moves into cells, level in blood decreases and release of Insulin by pancreas decreases. If an individual is not able to produce enough Insulin, or if the body's cells are resistant to its effects, Glucose cannot reach most of the body's cells and cells starve. Meanwhile, blood glucose rise to an unhealthy level. This can cause disturbances in the normal metabolic process that result in various disorders and complications, including kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, and vision and neurological problems. Diabetes, disorder associated with high Glucose levels and decrease Insulin effects, can be a life-threatening condition. People with Type 1 Diabetes produce very little Insulin and so eventually require Insulin supplementation therapy. Type 2 Diabetes is generally related to Insulin Resistance, which increases with time. With Insulin Resistance, many of the body's cells are unable to respond to the effects of Insulin, leaving Glucose in the blood. The body compensates by producing additional amounts of hormone.Sss


Introduction

With obesity and diabetes reaching epidemic proportions in the developed world, the role of insulin resistance and its sequelae is gaining prominence. Understanding the role of insulin across wide range of physiological processes and influences on its synthesis and secretion, alongside its actions from molecular to whole body level, has significant implications for many chronic diseases seen in Westernised populations today. Consequently, more than a century after scientists began to elucidate the role of pancreas in diabetes, studies of insulin and insulin resistance remain at the forefront of medical research, relevant at all levels from bench to bedside and to public health policy.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Background

Insulin is a peptide hormone that is secreted from beta cells of islets of Langerhans in the pancreas. It is initially synthesize in endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus As proinsulin; It is then cleave to Insulin and C-peptide. Although Insulin and C-peptide are cosecreted in equal molar proportions, ratio of serum Insulin to C-peptide is 1: 5-15. Fifty to sixty percent of Insulin is extracted by liver before it reaches systemic circulation, and it has a half-life of only 4 minutes. In contrast, C-peptide and proinsulin are excrete via the kidney. Insulin is an anabolic hormone that promotes glucose uptake, glycogenesis, lipogenesis, and protein synthesis of skeletal muscle and fat tissue through the tyrosine kinase receptor pathway. In addition, Insulin is the most important factor in regulation of plasma Glucose Homeostasis, as it counteracts glucagon and other catabolic hormonesepinephrine, glucocorticoid, and Growth hormone. In normal physiology, Insulin secretion is induced by elevated plasma glucose levels. Glucose diffuses to beta cells through Glucose transporter 2 and activates the glycolysis pathway, leading to elevated adenosine triphosphate levels. Increasing ATP levels induce ATP-sensitive K + channels to shut down and subsequently stimulate depolarization of beta-cell membrane. Then, voltage-gate Ca 2 + channels are open to increase cytosolic Ca 2 + and trigger Insulin exocytosis. However, high Insulin levels in hypoglycemic state have been found in hypersecretory state; example is insulinoma, in which Insulin is secreted at at a high rate independent from plasma glucose level. Interestingly, oral administration of Glucose is more effective in increasing Insulin secretion than Intravenous Glucose. Carbohydrate meals potentiate Insulin secretion through multiple gastrointestinal hormones, including cholecystokinin, glucagonlike peptide-1, and gastric-inhibiting polypeptide.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Insulin Sensitivity

Insulin levels can also be used to assess Insulin resistance versus sensitivity. In Insulin resistance, ability of cells to respond to action of Insulin in transporting glucose into tissues is diminish; consequently, resistant individual begins secreting above-normal amounts of Insulin to obtain a quantitatively normal response. Insulin resistance develops long before the appearance of disease signs. A study by Kraft found borderline Diabetes in 14% of subjects with normal oral glucose tolerance tests who had been randomly referred for such evaluation. There are multiple methods available to assess Insulin resistance, including the following: each of these methods has its own limitations. Lack of standardization of Insulin assay procedures prevents comparison of results between studies; as result, studies can be compared only qualitatively. The American Diabetes Association organized a task force to standardize Insulin assays. HOMA equations have been one of the tools widely used in research to estimate Insulin resistance. Two equations are as follow, with HOMA-IR used to assess Insulin resistance and HOMA-B used to assess pancreatic beta-cell function: fasting Insulin levels can serve as a tool to help guide choice of therapy in patients newly diagnosed with type 2 Diabetes. A study by Saxena et al found that such patients with normal to low initial fasting serum Insulin levels respond better to glipizide than to metformin. On the other hand, those with high fasting serum Insulin levels respond significantly better to metformin than to glipizide.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Development

Its main role is to regulate the amount of nutrients circulating in your bloodstream. Although insulin is mostly implicated in blood sugar management, it also affects fat and protein metabolism. When you eat meals that contain carbs, amount of blood sugar in your bloodstream increases. Cells in your pancreas sense this increase and release insulin into your blood. Insulin then travels around your bloodstream, telling your cells to pick up sugar from your blood. This process results in reduced blood sugar levels. Especially high blood sugar can have toxic effects, causing severe harm and potentially leading to death if untreated. However, cells sometimes stop responding to insulin correctly. This is called insulin resistance. Under this condition, your pancreas produces even more insulin to lower your blood sugar levels. This leads to high insulin levels in your blood, termed hyperinsulinemia. Over time, your cells may become increasingly resistant to insulin, resulting in a rise in both insulin and blood sugar levels. Eventually, your pancreas may become damage, leading to decreased insulin production. After blood sugar levels exceed a certain threshold, you may be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance is the main cause of this common disease that affects about 9% of people worldwide. Insulin resistance and insulin sensitivity are two sides of the same coin. If you have insulin resistance, you have low insulin sensitivity. Conversely, if you are sensitive to insulin, you have low insulin resistance. While insulin resistance is harmful to your health, insulin sensitivity is beneficial.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Risk factors

Same factors that increase the odds of getting type 2 Diabetes also increase the risk of prediabetes. These factors include: weight. Being overweight is a primary risk factor for prediabetes. The more fatty tissue you have, especially inside and between muscle and skin around your abdomen, the more resistant your cells become to insulin. Waist size. Large waist size can indicate insulin resistance. The risk of insulin resistance go up for men with waists larger than 40 inches and for women with waists larger than 35 inches. Diet. Eating red meat and processed meat, and drinking sugar-sweeten beverages, is associated with a higher risk of prediabetes. A diet high in fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grains and olive oil is associated with a lower risk of prediabetes. Inactivity. The less active you are, greater your risk of prediabetes. Physical activity helps you control your weight, uses up sugar for energy and makes the body use insulin more effectively. Age. Although Diabetes can develop at any age, risk of prediabetes increases after age 45. Family history. Your risk of prediabetes increases if you have a parent or sibling with type 2 Diabetes. Race or ethnicity. Although it's unclear why, certain people, including Black, Hispanic, American Indian and Asian American people are more likely to develop prediabetes. Gestational Diabetes. If you have Diabetes while pregnant, you and your child are at higher risk of developing prediabetes. If you've had gestational Diabetes, your doctor will likely check your blood sugar levels at least once every three years. Polycystic ovary syndrome. Women with this common condition characterized by irregular menstrual periods, excess hair growth and obesity have a higher risk of prediabetes. Sleep. People with obstructive sleep apnea condition that disrupts sleep repeatedly have an increased risk of insulin resistance. Tobacco smoke. Smoking may increase insulin resistance. Smokers also seem to carry more weight around middle. High blood pressure Low levels of High-density lipoprotein cholesterol, good cholesterol High levels of triglyceride type of fat in your blood When these conditions occur with obesity, they are associated with insulin resistance. The combination of three or more of these conditions is often called metabolic syndrome.


Causes

Glucose sugar is the main source of energy for cells that make up muscles and other tissues. Glucose comes from two major sources: food and your liver. Sugar is absorbed into the bloodstream, where it enters cells with the help of insulin. Your liver stores and makes glucose. When your glucose levels are low, such as when you haven't eaten in a while, liver breaks down stored glycogen into glucose to keep your glucose level within normal range. In type 2 diabetes, this process doesn't work well. Instead of moving into your cells, sugar builds up in your bloodstream. As blood sugar levels increase, insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas release more insulin, but eventually these cells become impaired and can't make enough insulin to meet the body's demands. In much less common type 1 diabetes, immune system mistakenly destroys beta cells, leaving the body with little to no insulin.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Prevention

Insulin is an important hormone that controls many bodily processes. However, problems with this hormone are at the heart of many modern health conditions. Insulin resistance, in which your cells stop responding to insulin, is incredibly common. In fact, over 32. 2% of the US population may have this condition. Depending on diagnostic criteria, this number may rise to 44% in women with obesity and over 80% in some patient groups. About 33% of children and teenagers with obesity may have insulin resistance as well. Even so, simple lifestyle measures can dramatically improve this condition. This article explains all you need to know about insulin and insulin resistance.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

What is hyperinsulinemia?

Hyperinsulinemia is a condition where the amount of Insulin in the blood is higher than is usual. Insulin is a hormone that helps regulate blood sugar levels. Pancreas make Insulin. Insulin allows the body to use and absorb sugar, or glucose, from the blood. Body cells use glucose for energy to complete their normal functions. The body needs Insulin to keep blood glucose levels in a healthy range. When functioning properly, pancreas will create enough Insulin to regulate blood glucose levels. Typically, this means it will increase production following meal, particularly if the meal is high in sugar or simple carbohydrates. Insulin resistance is the chief cause of hyperinsulinemia. Insulin resistance means that body cells do not use Insulin as effectively. This resistance leads to higher levels of blood glucose. As a result of elevated blood glucose levels, pancreas produces more Insulin to keep up with blood sugar processing. Hyperinsulinemia is different from hyperglycemia, which is when a person has abnormally high blood sugar levels.


How is hyperinsulinemia caused?

Treatment of Hyperinsulinemia is gear towards addressing the underlying cause. If Insulin Resistance is causing Hyperinsulinemia, weight loss, diet, and exercise are the best ways to improve both conditions. If your Insulin Resistance has progressed to prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, and you have been prescribed medication from your healthcare provider, staying compliant with your medication can help improve your Hyperinsulinemia. Metformin, which can be prescribed for both prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, is one type of medication that improves the way your body responds to Insulin, potentially reducing the need for your pancreas to compensate for Insulin Resistance. If your Hyperinsulinemia is caused by insulinoma, surgical resection of the tumor can lead to definitive treatment. Although rare, some Insulinomas can metastasize to other parts of the body. In these cases, more advanced interventions may be require. If Hyperinsulinemia is caused by Nesidioblastosis, evidence has shown that surgical removal of portion of pancreas can be effective for treatment. One risk of this procedure is later development of Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus because the pancreas is no longer able to make as much Insulin as the body needs.


What are the causes?

Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that has many functions. One of insulin's main functions is to transport glucose from the bloodstream into cells where it can be used for energy. In some people, insulin does not work properly because cell receptors have developed resistance to insulin, which means that insulin is ineffective at removing glucose from the bloodstream. This condition is called insulin resistance. Consequently, glucose builds up in the bloodstream. Because the body is unable to access glucose for fuel, cells become starved and you may feel excessively hungry or thirsty. The body attempts to lower blood sugar levels by releasing even more insulin into the bloodstream. As a result, body ends up with both high blood sugar levels and high insulin levels. Some experts think that hyperinsulinemia is caused by insulin resistance, while others posit that insulin resistance causes hyperinsulinemia. Regardless of underlying etiology, two states are closely intertwine. When blood sugar increases, pancreas' beta cells respond by producing and releasing more insulin into the bloodstream to try to keep blood glucose at a normal level. As cells become insulin resistant, level of insulin keeps rising up. The way insulin is metabolized in your body may depend on your race, gender, age, and environmental factors, as well as diet and activity level. All of these separate factors may be tied to your insulin sensitivitymore. Research is needed to fully understand all causal factors. Hyperinsulinemia may also occur as a side effect of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery, which may be related to altered nutrient transit due to newly created stomach pouch and bypass gastrointestinal tract. However, this may be temporary. Researchers have found this effect may be reversible with placement of gastronomy tube in original stomach. In rare cases, hyperinsulinemia may be caused by tumor of beta cells in the pancreas or by excessive growth of beta cells, condition called nesidioblastosis.


What are the treatment options?

A diet is particularly important in any treatment, as well as with the treatment of hyperinsulinemia. A healthy diet can help better regulate your body's overall functions and reduce excess weight. It may also help regulate your glucose and insulin levels. There are three preferred diets for glycemic control and treatment of hyperinsulinemia. They are: Mediterranean Diet, Low-Fat Diet, Low-carbohydrate Diet. These diets can help with your glycemic control, which will improve your bodys insulin response. High-protein diets should be avoid. Diets high in protein may help with some forms of diabetes, but they can increase hyperinsulinemia. Each of these diets consist primarily of fruits, whole grains, vegetables, fiber, and lean meats. Be sure to discuss any diet changes with your doctor before beginning a new diet plan.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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