Advanced searches left 3/3
Search only database of 8 mil and more summaries

Mortality Rate Of Covid 19

Summarized by PlexPage
Last Updated: 02 July 2021

* If you want to update the article please login/register

General | Latest Info

Excess mortality is a term used in epidemiology and Public Health that refers to the number of deaths from all causes during a crisis above and beyond what we would expect to see under normal conditions. 1 in this case, were interested in how deaths during COVID - 19 pandemic compare to the average number of deaths over the same period in previous years. Excess mortality is a more comprehensive measure of the total impact of pandemic on deaths than the confirmed COVID - 19 Death count alone. In addition to confirmed deaths, excess mortality capture COVID - 19 deaths that were not correctly diagnosed and reported 2 as well as deaths from other causes that are attributable to overall crisis conditions. 3 excess mortality can be measured in several ways. The simplest way is to take the raw number of deaths observed in give period in 2020 - say Week 10, which ends on 8 March 4 - and subtract the average number of deaths in that week over previous years,. For example, last five. While the raw number of deaths helps give the US a sense of scale, this measure is less comparable across countries due to large differences in populations. The measure that is more comparable across countries is P - score, which calculates excess mortality as the percentage difference between the number of weekly deaths in 2020 and the average number of deaths in the same week over the previous five years. For example, if a country had a P - score of 100% in give week in 2020, that would mean the death count for that week was 100% higher than - that is, double - average death count in the same week over the previous five years. The chart here shows excess mortality during the pandemic for all ages using P - score. 5 You can see that some countries - such as England & Wales 6 and Spain - suffer high levels of excess mortality, while others - such as Germany and Norway - experience much more modest increases in mortality. To see P - scores for other countries, click Add country on the chart. It is important to note that because P - scores in this chart combine all ages, they are impacted by differences in mortality risk by age and countries ' age distributions. For example, countries with older populations - which have higher mortality risk, including From COVID - 19 - will tend to have higher all - age P - scores by default. When comparing countries, it is informative to look at P - scores for different age groups. The chart here shows P - scores broken down by two broad age groups: ages 15 - 64, which contain most of the working age population, and age 85 +, which has the highest mortality risk. 7 Two more age groups can also be selected by clicking Add country: ages 65 - 74 and ages 75 - 84. You can see that Spain suffers high levels of excess mortality even for its younger, working population aged 15 - 64, while Germany experiences relatively low levels of mortality even for its most vulnerable population age 85 +.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Worldwide mortality

Excess mortality refers to the number of deaths from all causes above and beyond what we would expect to see under normal conditions. 1 in this case, were interested in how deaths during COVID - 19 pandemic compare to the average number of deaths over the same period in previous years. Looking at excess mortality is helpful for understanding the total impact of pandemic on deaths - both direct and indirect. It helps the US understand the direct impact by capturing deaths caused by COVID - 19 that were not correctly diagnosed and report, for example, because no test for virus was conduct. It helps the US understand indirect mortality impact by capturing many ways in which pandemic has affected health systems and living conditions. For example, if a pandemic overwhelms health systems or diverts resources away from other health problems, more people may die from non - COVID causes than we would expect. Excess mortality is thus a more comprehensive measure of the impact of pandemic on deaths than the confirmed COVID - 19 death count alone.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

High-Risk Groups

Table

Racial/Ethnic groupMean of estimated differences, % (range)Mean of estimated ratios of proportion of cases to proportion of population (range)
Hispanic/Latino30.2 (8.0 to 68.2)4.4 (1.2 to 14.6)
Black/African American14.5 (2.3 to 31.7)2.3 (1.2 to 7.0)
American Indian/Alaska Native39.3 (16.4 to 57.9)4.2 (1.9 to 6.4)
Asian4.7 (2.7 to 6.8)2.9 (2.0 to 4.7)
Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander4.5 (0.1 to 31.5)8.5 (2.7 to 18.4)

For every 1 000 people infected with Coronavirus WHO are under the age of 50, almost none will die. For people in their fifties and early sixties, about five will die more men than women. Risk then climb steeply as years accrue. For every 1 000 people in their mid - seventies or older WHO are infect, around 116 will die. These are stark statistics obtained by some of the first detailed studies into Mortality Risk for COVID - 19. Trends in Coronavirus deaths by age have been clear since early in the Pandemic. Research teams looking at the presence of antibodies against SARS - CoV - 2 in people in the general population in Spain, England, Italy and Geneva in Switzerland have now quantified that risk, said Marm Kilpatrick, infectious - disease researcher at University of California, Santa Cruz. It gives the US a much sharper tool when asking what impact might be on certain population that has a certain demographic, say Kilpatrick. Studies reveal that age is by far the strongest predictor of infected persons risk of dying metric know as Infection Fatality Ratio, which IS the proportion of people infected with virus, including those WHO do get test or show symptoms, WHO will die as a result. Covid - 19 IS not just hazardous for elderly people, it IS extremely dangerous for people in their mid - fifties, sixties and seventies, say Andrew Levin, economist at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, WHO has estimated that getting COVID - 19 IS More Than 50 Times More Likely to be fatal for 60 - year - old Than IS Driving car. But age cannot explain everything, says Henrik Salje, infectious - Disease epidemiologist at University of Cambridge, UK. Gender IS also a strong risk factor, with men almost twice more likely to die from Coronavirus than women. And differences between countries in fatality estimates for older age groups suggest that the risk of dying from Coronavirus IS also linked to underlying health conditions, capacity of health - care systems, and whether the virus has spread among people living in elderly - care facilities.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Risk Perception vs. Reality

Shortly after the University of Washington announced that the school's fourth suspected case of new coronavirus had turned out negative, two professors, one of public policy and other of public Health, held a small dinner for students and faculty members. Like everywhere else on campus, and in much of the world, coronavirus was all anybody could talk about. But one of the attendees, public health student, had had enough. Exasperate, she rattled off set of statistics. The virus has killed about 1 100 people worldwide and infected around a dozen in the United States. An alarming, but much more common illness, influenza, kills about 400 000 people every year, including 34 200 Americans last Flu season and 61 099 year ago. There remains deep uncertainty about the new coronavirus mortality rate, with high - end estimate that it is up to 20 times that of Flu, but some estimates go as low as 0. 16 percent of those affected outside of China overwhelm Hubei province. About on par with Flu. Wasnt there something strange, student ask, about extreme disparity in public reactions? Ann Bostrom, dinners public policy co - host, laughed when she recounted the evening. The student was right about viruses, but not about people, said Dr. Bostrom, who is an expert on psychology of how humans evaluate risk. While metrics of public health might put flu alongside or even ahead of new coronavirus for sheer deadliness, she say, mind has its own ways of measuring danger. And new coronavirus disease, named COVID - 19, hits nearly every cognitive trigger we have. Of course, it is far from irrational to feel some fear about coronavirus outbreak tearing through China and beyond. But there is lesson, psychologists and public health experts say, in near - terror that virus induces, even as serious threats like flu receive little more than shrug. It illustrates unconscious biases in how human beings think about risk, as well as impulses that often guide our responses, sometimes with serious consequences. Experts used to believe that people gauge risk like actuaries, parsing out cost - benefit analyses every time merging cars come too close or local crime rates spike. But a wave of psychological experiments in the 1980s upended this thinking. Researchers find that people use a set of mental shortcuts for measuring danger. And they tend to do it unconsciously, meaning that instinct can play a much larger role than they realize. The world is full of risks, big and small. Ideally, these shortcuts help people figure out which ones to worry about and which to disregard. But they can be imperfect. This hit all hot buttons that lead to heightened risk perception, says Paul Slovic, University of Oregon psychologist who helped pioneer modern risk psychology. When you encounter a potential risk, your brain does a quick search for past experiences with it. If it can easily pull up multiple alarming memories, then your brain concludes the danger is high.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Flu comparison.

Firstly, COVID - 19 and Influenza viruses have similar disease presentation. That is, they both cause Respiratory Disease, which presents a wide range of illnesses from asymptomatic or mild through to severe disease and death. Secondly, both viruses are transmitted by contact, droplets and fomites. As a result, same public health measures, such as hand hygiene and good respiratory etiquette, are important actions all can take to prevent infection. Speed of transmission is an important point of difference between two viruses. Influenza has a shorter median incubation period and shorter serial interval than the COVID - 19 virus. The serial interval for COVID - 19 virus is estimated to be 5 - 6 days, while for the Influenza virus, serial interval is 3 days. This means that Influenza can spread faster than COVID - 19. Further, transmission in the first 3 - 5 days of illness, or potentially pre - symptomatic transmission - transmission of virus before appearance of symptoms - is major driver of transmission for Influenza. In contrast, while we are learning that there are people who can shed COVID - 19 virus 24 - 48 hours prior to symptom onset, at present, this does not appear to be a major driver of transmission. The Reproductive number - the number of secondary infections generated from one infected individual - is understood to be between 2 and 2. 5 for COVID - 19 virus, higher than for Influenza. However, estimates for both COVID - 19 and Influenza viruses are very context and time - specific, making direct comparisons more difficult. Children are important drivers of Influenza virus transmission in the community. For the COVID - 19 virus, initial data indicate that children are less affected than adults and that clinical attack rates in the 0 - 19 age group are low. Further preliminary data from household transmission studies in China suggest that children are infected by adults, rather than vice versa. While the range of symptoms for two viruses is similar, cases with severe disease appear to be different. For COVID - 19, data to date suggest that 80% of infections are mild or asymptomatic, 15% are severe infection,ss requiring oxygen and 5% are critical infections, requiring ventilation. These fractions of severe and critical infection would be higher than what is observed for Influenza Infection. Those most at risk for severe Influenza Infection are children, pregnant women, elderly, those with underlying chronic medical conditions and those who are immunosuppressed. For COVID - 19, our current understanding is that older age and underlying conditions increase the risk for severe infection. Mortality for COVID - 19 appears higher than for Influenza, especially seasonal influenza. While the true mortality of COVID - 19 will take some time to fully understand, data we have so far indicate that the crude mortality ratio is between 3 - 4%, and the infection mortality rate will be lower. For seasonal influenza, mortality is usually well below 0. 1%. However, mortality is to a large extent determined by access to and quality of health care.


Coronavirus vs. Flu Deaths

The first thing to know is that deaths due to COVID - 19 and flu are not counted in the same way. This means comparing numbers isnt as straightforward as we would like. Each death due to influenza in the US does not have to be report, so there is never a direct count. Each flu season, CDC estimates deaths from flu based on in - hospital deaths and death certificate data. They continue to update data on their website as they collect it. Therefore, numbers from the last two flu seasons are not considered final just yet. Conversely, each death due to COVID - 19 is being record. Numbers you see and hear about are not estimates. So you can see how comparing mortality rates between two isnt exact at this point. That say, here is a quick look at the number of cases and deaths for the last two flu seasons and COVID - 19 to date:

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

The places hit hardest

The Coronavirus has left no state unscathed. But its impact has been wildly uneven. Officials in California, Florida and Texas, states with most known cases, have each identified more than 700 000 cases. In a few less populous States, including Vermont and Maine, there are fewer than 10 000 patients. And in a handful of remote counties, there has been not even one positive test. Nations most populous places have all suffered tremendously. In Cook County, Ill.,. Which includes Chicago, more than 5 000 people have die. In Los Angeles County, Calif., At least 255 000 people have had the virus, more than in most States. And in New York City, about one of every 360 residents has die. But unlike in the early days of the pandemic, it is not so simple to say that big cities have been hit hardest. On per capita basis, many of the places with most cases have been small and mid - size metros in the Southwest with large Native American or Hispanic populations. In Yuma County, Ariz.,. Along the countrys border with Mexico, about one of every 17 residents is known to have had virus. In McKinley County, NM, which includes part of the hard - hit Navajo Nation, one of every 283 residents has died from COVID - 19. Because outbreaks in group settings where large numbers of people are in close quarters have been major driver of the pandemic, Times has paid special attention to cases in nursing homes, food processing plants, correctional facilities and, more recently, at colleges and universities. Information on these cases comes directly from official releases by governments, companies and institutions. The tables below show courses that have been identified since the beginning of the pandemic, and with the exception of tables for colleges and universities, only show groups of cases where 50 or more are related to a specific site.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Cases at colleges and universities

Although older adults face the highest risk of being hospitalized with or dying from COVID - 19, younger adults can also end up in hospital. If they do, outcome can be serious, and a new study is providing a look at just how severe the disease can be for those patients. Of roughly 3 200 people aged 18 to 34 WHO were admitted to 419 US hospitals from early April to the end of June, 21 percent, or 684 people, were in intensive care and 10 percent, or 331 patients, ended up on ventilators. Almost 3 percent, or nearly 90 people, die, researchers report September 9 in JAMA Internal Medicine. Those numbers are alarming figures give that COVID - 19 outbreaks are rampant in many US colleges that are open for in - person learning, said Aubree Gordon, epidemiologist at University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Younger adults now make up nearly a quarter of US coronavirus cases. The 3 percent death rate is lower than what has been reported for hospitalized older adults with COVID - 19, which was more than 20 percent in two separate studies from the United States and Germany, but still higher than it is for some other illnesses. For instance, it is more than twice the death rate for heart attacks in young adults, researchers write. Underlying conditions like severe obesity or high blood pressure were linked to more serious illness or death. And the team found that younger adults WHO have multiple underlying conditions can face similar risks of serious illness and death as people 35 to 64 years old without those conditions. More than half of hospitalized young adults were Black or Hispanic, although race or ethnicity was not associated with increased risk of death or needing ventilator. Seeing more severe disease in younger adults with underlying conditions mirrors findings from larger populations that include people from other age groups, said Aaron Milstone, pediatric infectious Disease specialist at Johns Hopkins University. Because studies consider only hospitalized patients, it ca say what the risk is for young adults in general. Who are infected with coronavirus, he say. But if you get hospitalize, your risk of complications is high, and that should be concerning for everyone, whether they are child, young adult or senior citizen, Milstone say. What's more, 3 percent of people WHO survive their hospital stay need more care in nursing facility afterward. It is unknown whether any other patients discharged from hospital suffer from lingering COVID - 19 symptoms. Young people often shrug off their risk, citing their age, Gordon say. But findings underscore the fact that younger people are still at risk of severe symptoms, she say, particularly if they have other health conditions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Cases in jails and prisons

Covid - 19 Cases in US Federal and State Prisons were 5. 5 times higherand death rates three times higherthan in the general population from Mar 31 to Jun 6, according to a research letter published yesterday in JAMA. Researchers from Johns Hopkins University and University of California Los Angeles COVID - 19 Behind Bars Data Project examined Prison Data from All States, District of Columbia, and Federal Bureau of Prisons from publicly available data sources such as Medical examiner reports, Corrections Department websites, media reports, and news releases. A total of 42 107 out of 1 295 285 prisoners had been infected with novel coronavirus, for a case rate of 3. 25%, versus 0. 59% of the general US population. In the US population, there have been 1 920 904 coronavirus cases and 95 608 deaths. Of prisoners infect, 510 die, for a death rate of 0. 039%, versus 0. 029% outside of the Prisons. But the proportion of prisoners aged 65 and older in the prison population was smaller than that of the general population. That age - group accounts for 81% of US coronavirus deaths. After adjusting for age and sex differences between the two populations, death rate was three times higher for inmates than for non - inmates.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Cases at food production facilities

Outbreaks of coronavirus Disease 2019 among Food Production workers may worsen pandemics disproportionate effects on people of color and increase underlying health, economic, and social disparities, according to analysis by Kaiser Family Foundation. Numerous COVID - 19 outbreaks in meat and poultry processing plants erupt not long after cases emerge in the United States. On May 1, study published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said that 19 States had Report 4913 cases and 20 deaths among approximately 130 000 workers at 115 meat and poultry processing facilities. Such facilities have distinctive factors that affect workers ' risk of exposure to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. These factors include prolonged closeness to other workers for long shifts of up to 12 hours, exposure to potentially contaminate shared surfaces or objects, and close contact during transportation to and from work, such as in ride - share vans, carpools, or public transportation. More recently, according to a report by Reuters, although social distancing may be less of an issue for agricultural workers who work outside harvesting fruits and vegetables in fields, facilities that package foods have conditions similar to those of meat and poultry processing plants and are emerging as hot spots for SARS - CoV - 2 spread. In their review of data from County officials, Reuters found that the majority of more than 600 cases of COVID - 19 tallied by late May among agricultural workers in Yakima County, Washington, were workers in the apple industry and other packing operations or warehouses. In the KFF analysis, Samantha Artiga, MHSA, and Matthew Rae, MPA, MPH, examine key characteristics of 3. 4 million people who work in US Food Production industries, including meat and poultry processors, seafood producers, fruit and vegetable producers, crop production, and other food manufacturing businesses. Their goal was to identify those who are affected by risks posed by COVID - 19 and consider the health and financial implications of the pandemic for these workers and their communities. Their findings indicate that COVID - 19 outbreaks among food production workers may exacerbate the disproportionate impact COVID - 19 is having on people of color and widen underlying health, social, and economic disparities, authors note. The federal government has designated the food and agricultural sector as part of essential critical infrastructure, industries that have special responsibility in these times to continue operations. A Presidential Executive Order issued on April 28 invoked the Defense Production Act to keep meat processing plants open. Moreover, on May 19, US Department of Agriculture and US Food and Drug Administration said the federal government could authorize similar actions to keep companies that manufacture, process, pack, hold, or grow or harvest food open and running. Kff analysis finds that although the majority of food production workers are white and US citizens, this sector has disproportionately larger shares of Hispanic and noncitizen workers than in the US workforce overall. About one - third of food production workers are Hispanic, and 22% are noncitizens. One in 4 food production workers is less than fluent in English.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

About the data

* Data during this period is incomplete because of lag in time between when death occurs and when the death certificate is complete, submitted TO NCHS and processed for reporting purposes. This delay can range from 1 week to 8 weeks or more, depending on jurisdiction and cause of death. 1 Deaths with confirmed or presumed COVID - 19, cod TO ICD - 10 code U07. 1 2 Counts of Deaths involving pneumonia include pneumonia Deaths that also involve COVID - 19 and exclude pneumonia deaths involving influenza. 3 Counts of Deaths involving influenza include Deaths with pneumonia or COVID - 19 also listed as cause of Death. 4 Deaths with confirmed or presumed COVID - 19, pneumonia, or influenza, cod TO ICD - 10 codes U07. 1 or J09 - 18. 9 * data during this period is incomplete because of the lag in time between when death occurs and when the death certificate is complete, submitted TO NCHS and processed for reporting purposes. This delay can range from 1 week to 8 weeks or more, depending on jurisdiction and cause of death. 1 Deaths with confirmed or presumed COVID - 19, cod TO ICD - 10 code U07. 1 2 Counts of Deaths involving pneumonia include pneumonia Deaths that also involve COVID - 19 and exclude pneumonia deaths involving influenza.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

logo

Plex.page is an Online Knowledge, where all the summaries are written by a machine. We aim to collect all the knowledge the World Wide Web has to offer.

Partners:
Nvidia inception logo

© All rights reserved
2021 made by Algoritmi Vision Inc.

If you believe that any of the summaries on our website lead to misinformation, don't hesitate to contact us. We will immediately review it and remove the summaries if necessary.

If your domain is listed as one of the sources on any summary, you can consider participating in the "Online Knowledge" program, if you want to proceed, please follow these instructions to apply.
However, if you still want us to remove all links leading to your domain from Plex.page and never use your website as a source, please follow these instructions.