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Nordic Christmas

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Last Updated: 02 July 2021

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These curious customs help Scandinavians get through months-long winter darkness. Among all holidays and celebrations throughout the year, Christmas is a favorite of the Nordic region, vast swath of land that covers Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Iceland, and Finland. After long, gloomy fall and less than five hours of daylight at the peak of winter, Christmas marks a turning point when light begins to prevail over darkness. Its only natural that this holiday brings special joy to regions residents. But some of Nordic Christmas traditions may come as a surprise. Nordic Christmas roots go into the pagan holiday of Yule, days-long feast that was perhaps the most important celebration of the year, Winter Solstice. Yule is important for several reasons: It gives farmers something to do at time when field work is over; It lifts spirits during the toughest time of year, when sickness and cold temperatures often claim easy victims; and it defies forces of evil that lurk in the dark, giving hope to people in surviving long Scandinavian Winter still ahead. Hold around same dates in late December, Yule goes through the process of Christianization around 9 century AD when, with the efforts of missionaries, it started shaping into the holiday we know today. Christmas in the Nordics is still referred to by its pagan name: Jul in Sweden, Norway, and Denmark, Jol in Iceland, and Joulu in Finland. In most Nordic countries, weeks-long Christmas celebration kicks off on December 13. This tradition of starting early, particularly strong in Sweden, is also observed in Norway, Finland, and Denmark. Call Saint Lucia Day in honor of the 4-century martyr from Syracuse, day begins with young girls wearing wreath of long white candles on their heads and treating the rest of the family to special saffron-flavor lussekater buns. In Iceland, festivities start even earlieron first Advent Sunday. That when decades-Old annual lighting of Oslo Christmas Tree, gift to the city of Reykjavik by its Norwegian neighbor, occurs at Austurvollur Square. The long-awaited event gathers thousands, but it is particularly anticipated by families with small children. It is not uncommon for Nordics to get two weeksfrom December 24 to January 6off from work for Christmas. Across the region, festivities last all way to January 6, Day of Epiphany, also called Day of Three Kings. The day is celebrated across the Christian world as a time when Three Magi come bearing gifts to visit baby Jesus, but in the Nordics, it marks the end of Christmas celebrations. In many homes, Christmas Tree is keep until then to keep the spirit going. In just about every Nordic culture, mythical creatures start visiting homes twelve days before Christmas. At bedtime, children leave slippers on the window sill in anticipation of gifts from nightly visitor. In the morning, slippers of those deemed well-behave will be laden with small toys, candy, or cookies.

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Sweden

The traditions of Christmas in Sweden are similar to those of Norway, down to visiting family between Christmas and New Year, or perhaps setting off for a ski holiday. Burning candles may be seen in most homes, and Christmas trees must be as straight as possible. This has become an adventure for folks who live outside cities, who fell their own trees. According to a Swedish tourist boards website, many Swedes believemistakenlythat their legal right of access to the countryside allows them to fetch Tree from woods wherever they like, with an axe, bucksaw or, as in western Varmland, with a shotgun. Blasting away at your Christmas Tree actually sounds like good fun, but one can see how it might disturb local wildlife. There is some overlap in the food department, too, such as vivacious consumption of glgg, called glogg in Swedish. The Christmas table will bring with jellied pig feet, sausage, lutfisk, ham, homemade pate, anchovy dish called gubbrora, and pickled herring. In olden days, plate of porridge was left out to mythical gnome-like creatures called brownies, who live in farmyard, and Christmas gifts were given anonymously, much like the popular Secret Santa game played at schools and workplaces, in which each participant is secretly give name of someone to whom they must buy gift, and recipients have to guess who giver is. Twelfth Night also features a typically Swedish tradition, in which stjarngossar, Star boys, go from farm to farm singing songs and carrying paper stars, representing of Star, followed by Three Wise Men to Bethlehem, in exchange for schnapps and other goodies. Lets just hope that stjarngossar of western Varmland dont combine too many schnapps with shotgunning down the Christmas Tree.

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* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Denmark

Danish word hygge describe certain kind of warm, comfortable coziness that is in abundance during the Christmas season in Denmark. In Copenhagen, youll find countless candle-lit restaurants and welcoming cafes, serving up delicious feasts and indulgent sweets. If you are traveling with little ones, youll want to take them to Tivoli Gardens, where they can meet Santa himself on the Open Air Stage and take photos with his sleigh. You can also head to Nyborg, medieval town just a one-hour train ride outside of Copenhagen. It features one of the largest and most authentic Christmas markets in Denmark-great place to get in the holiday spirit. Unlike many other places, Danish celebrate Christmas with traditional meal and festivities on 24 of December. So, by 25, everyone is free to simply relax. Children play with their new toys and adults lounge, chat and enjoy leftovers.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Norway

Christmas Eve is the main event in Norway. For many, it includes church services and last-minute shopping for gifts. At 5 pm, churches ring their Christmas bells. Most people have dinner of ribbe or lutefisk at home, so restaurants are usually close. Christmas Eve dessert usually includes gingerbread or risengrynsgrot, hot rice pudding, and mull wine, glogg, for grownups. Then Christmas gifts are Open after dinner. Norway has a mischievous Christmas Elf called Nisse. This folkloric creature is personified as white-beard, red wearing spirit of the Winter Solstice. Today, he has been integrated with the figure of Sinterklass, modern-day Santa Claus. Like cookies traditionally left for Santa Claus today, it was customary to leave a bowl of rice porridge for Nisse. Paying homage to their Viking heritage, Norweigians recognize the tradition of Julebukk, in Norwegian, which translates to Yule Goat. Today it is symbolized by a Goat figurine made out of straw, created at the beginning of December, and often used as Christmas ornament. The Yule Goat's oldest representation is that of Thor's magical goats, which would lead him through the night sky. Yule Goat would protect house during Yuletide. It had been Norse tradition to sacrifice goats to gods and accompanying spirits during the time span between Winter Solstice and New Year. Yule Goat was a good luck charm for New Year to come. As with other Scandinavian countries, Christmas markets and concerts can be found in most cities across Norway during winter months. One extra special event is the world's largest gingerbread Town, located in Bergen, Norway's second-largest city. Pepperkakebyen, as delicious Town is call, is open to visitors each year from mid-November through the end of December. Merry Christmas in Norwegian is Gledelig Ju l or God Jul.


Christmas in Norway

Christmas Eve is a time when presents are exchange. Gifts are sometimes brought by Santa Claus. Presents are also brought by small gnomes called 'Nisse'. There are also hobgoblin decorations. Children pick up presents from under the Christmas Tree and read cards on presents out loud. During Advent / December in Norway, sometimes small gifts are given on each day of December leading up to Christmas. These are know as Adventsgav or Kalendergave. There is a similar tradition in Denmark. Gifts are sometimes used together with chocolate Advent calendar! As in Finland, sheaf of wheat is often left out for birds to eat over Christmas. Also, type of rice porridge is sometimes left to 'Nisse' who are believed to guard farm animals. In some parts of Norway, children like to go carol singing. Often, children will dress up as characters from Christmas Story, such as Shepherds and Wise Men, and go singing from house to house in their local neighborhood. Sometimes they carry paper stars on them. Another tradition in parts of Norway is that families light candles every night from Christmas Eve to New Year's Day. Christmas wasn't celebrated in Norway until about 1000 or 1100, when Christianity first came to the area. Before this, people celebrated July or July in the middle of winter. It was a celebration of harvest and a way of looking forward to spring. Lots of beer was brewed and drunk in honour of old pagan Scandinavian gods. Maybe the most famous custom about Christmas in Norway is the big Christmas Tree that Norway gives to the UK every year. The tree is given as a present to say 'thank you' for the help that people of the UK gave to Norway during World War II. A tree stands in Trafalgar Square in the middle of London and often thousands of people come to watch when lights are turned on. Traditional Norwegian Christmas Tree decorations are small paper baskets called 'Julekurver' which are made in the shape of a heart. It's said that the writer Hans Christian Andersen might have invented them in the 1860s! Instructions on how to make Julekurver are on this site: http: / www. Stavanger-web. Com / baskets. Php in Norwegian Happy / Merry Christmas is 'God Jul' or 'Gledelig Jul'. In North-Sami, spoken in northern parts of Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia, it's 'Buorit Juovllat'. Happy / Merry Christmas in lots more languages. Many different types of cakes and biscuits are eaten over the Christmas period in Norway. One of the most popular is a special bread called 'Julekake' that has raisins, candy peel and cardamom in it. Here's recipe for Norwegian Hole Cake. Rice Porridge is eaten on Christmas Eve either as meal at lunchtime or as dessert for main evening email. If you find almond in your portion you're traditionally give pink or white marzipan pig. The main meal is normally pork or mutton ribs served with'surkal' and potatoes.

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* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Finland

There is more to Christmas in Finland than just Jolly Old Elf, though. You can shop at Old Market Hall in Helsinki and find all sorts of traditional treats, including herring, salmon, reindeer kebabs and bear fat soap. Or, you can even visit Rovaniemi-charming Village known as Santas hometown. Holiday celebrations focus on food and the traditional dish is pork roast, often served with fish, casseroles and salad. Many Finnish families will also visit cemetery at Christmas Time, so that they can take a moment to remember their lost loved ones. Plus, Finns will typically warm up on cold winter night with a traditional sauna-great way to relax and recharge.

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* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Iceland

The Icelandic Christmas season lasts 26 days. It's the darkest time of year for that part of the WORLD with not much daylight at all, but NORTHERN LIGHTS may be visible in the north of the country. ICELAND has many age-old traditions during Christmastime, including the arrival of 13 Icelandic Santa Clauses. The origin of these Santas is centuries old, and each has a name, character, and role. Know as jolasveinar, or yuletide Lads, Santas are children of Gryla, mean old woman who drag off naughty children and supposedly boils them alive. Her husband, Leppaluoi, is not quite as mean. In the modern era, these characters have been softened bit to be less frightening. Children in ICELAND put shoes in their windows from December 12 until Christmas Eve. If they have been good, one of jolasveinar leaves gift. Bad children can expect to receive potato. Shops are open until 11: 30 pm on Christmas Eve, and many Icelanders attend midnight Mass. The main Christmas celebrations take place on Christmas Eve, including gift exchange. To express merry Christmas in Icelandic, greet others by saying Gleoileg jol. If you're looking for holiday activities in Iceland, Christmas Market in Hafnarfjorur is one of the largest and most popular, and is about a 20-minute drive outside of the capital city, Reykjavik. Apart from shopping, there are also hot food and drinks, horse-drawn carriage rides, and live music to keep you entertain.

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Jul & Christmas

If youre unfamiliar with July, it is a holiday that is the Nordic celebration of Christmas. Essentially, Christmas and July are very similar, but they are celebrated a little differently depending on what Nordic region youre from. For instance, if youre from Sweden, then youll celebrate more Swedish version of July or Yule. If youre from Norway, then your July will be more Norway orient. No matter what time of year it is, it is always best to get a head start on holidays. After all, holidays only are here once year and they come upon you so quickly and then leave even faster. Additionally, it is never too early to start getting your decorations and gifts in order. Whether its June or November, it is always a good idea to have in mind how you want to celebrate this year. Our Scandinavian products consist of Christmas decor that you can purchase all year round. We believe that you can never be too prepared for July and Christmas. Additionally, if youve been intrigued by Scandinavian traditions, then there is no better time to explore new culture than during Christmas time and the perfect place to start your traditions is with our Scandinavian Christmas decor. Merry, bright, and cheery, describe the vibe of July and Christmas Season, especially when you search through our ultimate Scandinavian Christmas celebration collection. We offer Scandinavian Christmas decorations and other products to make your Christmas this year a little more festive and fun. When you celebrate Yule Season, youll notice that there are a variety of ways to celebrate this giving season. July and Christmas are times for showing your love one how much you care about them in a variety of special ways. Our Scandinavian products are the perfect way to show your appreciation for your family and friends while still instilling new traditions in your Christmas celebration. New Christmas trends are always fun to implement, especially when they are Scandinavian traditions. July is the largest Nordic home holiday and we are happy to say we offer a collection of some of the most unique Scandinavian Christmas decor. We want to help you implement more of Scandinavian vibe in your home this Christmas Season. Some of the Scandinavian products you can purchase at Scandinavian Shoppe are Tomte-Santa Girl decorations, Candelabra, Scandinavian ornaments, festive cocktail napkins, and candle flats. Why dont you make your home a little more festive this holiday season when you shop at the Scandinavian Shoppe? From implementing new Scandinavian Christmas traditions to decorating your home with Nordic products, youll add some festiveness to your home.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Scandinavian Christmas Traditions | Norway

Norwegians do like their Christmases to begin nice and early. Unencumbered by Thanksgiving decorations, Norwegians deck their halls with boughs of holly in late November, with the streets of Oslo lined with illuminated Christmas trees. That warm and fuzzy Christmas feeling does wonders to lighten up the atmosphere in nations so near the Arctic Circle that winters feature only a few hours of sunlight per day. During the period of Advent, locals will be invited to julebord, pre-Christmas parties organized either privately or by companies and societies. December 23 is its own special holiday, sometimes referred to as Little Christmas Eve, which is time for families to decorate their Christmas trees, bake gingerbread and eat warming rice pudding, risengrynsgrt, flavored with cinnamon, sugar and butter. One portion will contain almond and, if you find it, you wina pig made of marzipan! On Christmas Eve, five bells ring from churches, and gifts are open at night, not on Christmas morning, as is tradition elsewhere. Christmas Day itself does not have particular traditions, but in the week leading to New Years, time is taken to visit family members who youve not had time to see during the year. Table for Christmas Eve meal is often set with pinnekjtt, ribbe, and acquire taste of lutefisk are local specialties, with risengrynsgrt for dessert, perhaps with toasted almonds. The drink of choice is glgg, mulled wine that is often used to dip pepperkake, Norways answer to gingerbread cookies, but which feature many more spices than ginger alone. Here's funny video about Americans eating Norwegian Christmas Food for the first time

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* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Creating A Cosy Atmosphere

Nordic Christmases are unique because aurora borealis is shining at its brightest in the night sky. Light is an essential part of Nordic Christmas traditions, as there is so little natural daylight to lift spirits during this time of year. Log fires, flickering candles, and fairy lights are a huge part of Nordic Christmas decor. If you want to set out perfect cosy Christmas theme in your home, start off with planning your lighting design. Advent lights in window and lots of white church candles are great place to start. Try setting your candles on your mantelpiece or on side tables in display with pinecones and festive foliage. You can also use LED lights strung in garlands or set to flicker behind your other festive decorations. Brighten the mood with accent lighting wherever you want to create a cosy Christmas glow.

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* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Colour And Contrast

This Scandinavian trend is all about those pale Neutral color palettes which are continuous throughout the entire home. Neutral colors are in place of traditional Christmas clutter with small touches of Holiday cheer to spread different comfort zone. Decorating with Neutral Holiday Color Palette for Scandinavian-themed is use of whites, cream shades, and more neutral colours with soft greys, lighter pastels to create a non-stressful, more peaceful environment of serenity, which purely focuses on the heart of home design. Since it is Christmas, gentle splash of occasional Christmas in red and white, winter greenery and even blues here and there may be used throughout decorative pieces. It is a matter of selecting touches you want to emphasise to give hint to season; such as odd bauble, ribbon ties or fair isle cushions and stockings. These bright colours and some pops of black for contrast mixed in with neutrals allow you to create designs that are nature-inspire and add interest but without overwhelming you with holiday fervor. Your staple colours will be white, beige, silver, and some gold. White Lights, simple Ornaments, and Neutral Decorative pillows will create a tasteful Holiday feel. From there, you can add occasional reds, shades 0f greens, and even blues that evoke azure tones of snowy landscapes. The typical Scandinavian Holiday Color Palette is white; pops of red, earthier golds and terracottas, bright accents on brilliant blue wool blanket, green wreaths, brightly colored bulbs for Tree, and candles are perfect backdrop for Holiday Decoration. These colourful, high-contrast bright colours are to complete the feel using different silver finishes. Adding candles to glass surfaces or near mercury glass will glow warmly and reflect light is a beautiful way to enhance the aesthetic and add Holiday cheer while remaining relaxed.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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