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Opioid Addiction

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Last Updated: 02 July 2021

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General | Latest Info

Opioid addiction is a long - lasting disease that can cause major health, social, and economic problems. Opioids are a class of drugs that act on the nervous system to produce feelings of pleasure and pain relief. Some opioids are legally prescribed by healthcare providers to manage severe and chronic pain. Commonly prescribed opioids include oxycodone, fentanyl, buprenorphine, methadone, oxymorphone, hydrocodone, codeine, and morphine. Some other opioids, such as heroin, are illegal drugs of abuse. Opioid addiction is characterized by a powerful, compulsive urge to use opioid drugs, even when they are no longer required medically. Opioids have high potential for causing addiction in some people, even when medications are prescribed appropriately and taken as directed. Many prescription opioids are misused or diverted to others. Individuals who become addicted may prioritize getting and using these drugs over other activities in their lives, often negatively impacting their professional and personal relationships. It is unknown why some people are more likely to become addicted than others. Opioids change the chemistry of the brain and lead to drug tolerance, which means that over time, dose needs to be increased to achieve the same effect. Taking opioids over long periods of time produces dependence, such that when people stop taking drug, they have physical and psychological symptoms of withdrawal. Dependence is not the same thing as addiction; although everyone who takes opioids for an extended period will become dependent, only a small percentage also experience compulsive, continuing need for drugs that characterize addiction. Opioid addiction can cause life - threatening health problems, including the risk of overdose. Overdose occurs when high doses of opioids cause breathing to slow or stop, leading to unconsciousness and death If overdose is not treated immediately. Both legal and illegal opioids carry a risk of overdose if person takes too much of a drug, or if opioids are combined with other drugs. The misuse of prescription opioids and heroin affects more than 2 million Americans and an estimated 15 million people worldwide each year. The prevalence of opioid misuse and addiction is rapidly increasing. In 2016, more than 20 000 deaths in the United States were caused by overdose of prescription opioids, and another 13 000 deaths resulted from heroin overdose. Drug overdoses are now the leading cause of death in US adults under age 50, and opioids account for more than half of all drug overdose deaths. The causes of opioid addiction are complex. This condition results from a combination of genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors, some of which have not been identify. Many of the genes that are thought to play a role in opioid addiction are involved in the endogenous opioid system, which is the body's internal system for regulating pain, reward, and addictive behaviors. It consists of opioid substances produced naturally within the body and their receptors, into which opioids fit like keys into locks. Opioids introduced from outside the body, including opioid medications and heroin, also exert their effects by acting on these receptors.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Summary of Issue

Service of National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; Health and Medicine Division; Board on Health Sciences Policy; Committee on Pain Management and Regulatory Strategies to Address Prescription Opioid Abuse; Phillips JK, Ford MA, Bonnie RJ, editors. Pain Management and Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use. Washington: National Academies Press; 2017 Jul 13. Not since the HIV / AIDS Epidemic has the United States faced as devastating and lethal health problem as the current crisis of opioid misuse and overdose and opioid use disorder. Current national trends indicate that each year more people die of overdosesthe majority of which involve opioid drugsthan die in the entirety of the Vietnam War, Korean War, or any armed conflict since the end of World War II. Each day, 90 Americans die prematurely from overdoses that involve Opioid, leaving families and friends bereft. The Opioid Epidemic's toll is felt across life span and in every sociodemographic group, but more heavily affects vulnerable populations, such as those in economically depressed areas of the country. This Chapter Update key statistics regarding use and misuse of Prescription opioids, identifies risk factors for Opioid - related harms, describes the recent increase in use of Heroin and illicitly manufactured synthetic opioids and its relation to the Prescription Opioid Epidemic, describes the impact of Prescription opioids on illicit markets, reviews current state of surveillance systems, and summarize recent trends in Treatment of OUD and Use of naloxone to prevent overdose deaths. The Committee selected these topics to discuss in particular their relevance to the US Food and Drug Administration's exercise of its authority to regulate pharmaceutical opioid products. Each aspect of this Chapter identifies considerations that should be taken into account when weighing societal perspective and public health impact relevant to these products when they are being considered for New Drug approval or during post - market surveillance.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Opioid Use Disorder

In 2017, more than 72 000 Americans died from drug overdoses, including illicit drugs and prescription opioids, 2 - fold increase in a decade. The sharpest increase involved synthetic opioids, primarily fentanyl and fentanyl analogs, with nearly 30 000 overdose deaths, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 1 Heroin was involved in nearly 16 000 deaths and prescription painkillers were involved in nearly 15 000 deaths. From 2002 to 2017, there was a 22 - fold increase in the total number of deaths involving fentanyl and other synthetic opioids and a more than 7 - fold increase in the number of deaths involving Heroin. Emergency Department visits for suspected opioid overdoses rose by 30 percent in the US from July 2016 to Sept. 2017. The opioid crisis was declared a nationwide Public Health Emergency on Oct. 27 2017.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Short-term versus long-term effects

When you take opioids repeatedly over time, your body slows its production of endorphins. The same dose of opioids stops triggering such a strong flood of good feelings. This is called tolerance. One reason opioid addiction is so common is that people who develop tolerance may feel driven to increase their doses so they can keep feeling good. Because doctors today are acutely aware of opioid risks, it's often difficult to get your doctor to increase your dose, or even renew your prescription. Some opioid users who believe they need increase supply turn, at this point, to illegally obtaining opioids or heroin. Some illegally obtained drugs, such as fentanyl, are laced with contaminants, or much more powerful opioids. Because of the potency of fentanyl, this particular combination has been associated with a significant number of deaths in those using heroin. If you are taking opioids and you 've developed tolerance, ask your doctor for help. There are other, safe choices available to help you make change and continue feeling well. Don't stop opioid medications without a doctor's help. Quitting these drugs abruptly can cause severe side effects, including pain worse than it was before you started taking opioids. Your doctor can help you taper off opioids slowly and safely.


What are Opioids?

Opioids are naturally found in opium poppy plant. They are a type of drug that manipulates the brain to produce a variety of different effects, most commonly as ingredient in many prescription pain relievers. There are also synthetic opioids such as fentanyl and illegal street opioids such as heroin. It is important to understand the long and short - term effects of opioid abuse and how they affect your body. Heroin usually comes in white or brown powder, and it can be injected into veins which give three to four times the strength of a similar dose of Morphine. In addition to being inject, heroin can also be snorted or smoke. Many prescription forms of opioids are used as pain management by blocking pain signals to the brain. They are typically prescribed for moderate to severe pain after major injury, surgery or for cancer - related treatments. Fentanyl Morphine Hydrocodone, also know as Vicodin Oxycodone, also known as Oxycontin or Percocet Codeine

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Opioid addiction risk factors

Table

Risk FactorsDomainProtective Factors
Early Aggressive BehaviorIndividualSelf-Control
Lack of Parental SupervisionFamilyParental Monitoring
Substance AbusePeerAcademic Competence
Drug AvailabilitySchoolAnti-drug Use Policies
PovertyCommunityStrong Neighborhood Attachment

Address correspondence to Lynn R. Webster, MD, PRA Health Sciences, 3838 S 700 E, Suite 202, Salt Lake City, UT 84106. Address E - mail to lrwebstermd gmail. Com. Opioid analgesics are recognized as legitimate medical therapy for select patients with severe chronic pain that do not respond to other therapies. However, opioids are associated with risks for patients and society. These include misuse, abuse, diversion, addiction, and overdose deaths. Therapeutic success depends on proper candidate selection, assessment before administering Opioid therapy, and close monitoring throughout the course of treatment. Risk Assessment and prevention include knowledge of patient factors that may contribute to misuse, abuse, addiction, suicide, and respiratory depression. Risk Factors for Opioid misuse or Addiction include past or current substance abuse, untreated psychiatric disorders, younger age, and social or family environments that encourage misuse. Opioid mortality prevalence is higher in people who are middle age and have substance abuse and psychiatric comorbidities. Suicides are probably undercounted or frequently misclassified in reports of Opioid - related poisoning deaths. Greater understanding and better assessment is needed of risk associated with suicide in patients with pain. Clinical tools and an evolving evidence base are available to assist clinicians with identifying patients whose risk factors put them at risk for adverse outcomes with Opioids.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Steps to prevent opioid addiction

It is well known that use of Prescription Opioid medications, more than other medications, is associated with risks of misuse, abuse, and diversion. 1 - 3 government and pharmaceutical companies have addrest this issue by implementing specific strategies to minimize risks associated with prescription drugs in general and with opioids in particular. In 2005, US Food and Drug Administration published 3 guidance for the pharmaceutical industry on risk management activities for drug and biologic products. 4 - 6 in these publications, FDA outlines several components of risk management, including assessing product's benefit - risk balance, developing and implementing tools to minimize its risks while preserving its benefits, evaluating tool effectiveness and reassessing benefit - risk balance, and making adjustments, as appropriate, to risk minimization tools to further improve benefit - Risk balance. 4 in 2007, FDA Amendments Act was passed into law, establishing requirements for Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies for drugs with safety concerns. These REMS requirements are accompanied by stipulations for physician and pharmacist training and certification, and patient registries for some medications, including opioids. 7 currently, Risk management Strategies, including REMS, are used by government and by pharmaceutical companies to minimize risks associated with Prescription Opioid Use, namely, potential for Abuse, Addiction, and diversion. Risk management tools can also benefit health plans, by minimizing potential health and economic risks associated with Prescription Opioid use for members who are using these medications. In this article, after reviewing available information on the prevalence of Prescription Opioid Abuse and resulting economic costs, author outlines strategies that have potential to minimize risks associated with Prescription Opioid use and could enhance patient's health and reduce costs to health plans and patients.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Buprenorphine Opioid Agonist Therapy

The United States is in the middle of a historically unprecedented opioid epidemic. Today, more people die of drug overdoses than any other form of accidental death, and opioid overdose rates surpass historic peak death rates from human immunodeficiency virus, gun violence, and motor vehicle accidents. 1 2 Opioid Addiction rates are at an all - time high. In 2014 4. 3 million people abused prescription opioids, 1. 9 million people had Opioid use disorder related to prescription pain relievers, and another 586 000 people had Opioid use disorder related to heroin. 3 this epidemic is attributable to a confluence of circumstances, primarily overprescribing by physicians combined with influx of potent heroin from Mexico. Epidemic has received additional fuel and urgency from the rise of extremely potent synthetic opioids such as fentanyl, carfentanil, and others. These synthetic drugs are often consumed unknowingly, mixed with illicit street heroin or compounded in fake versions of prescription opioids. As with other chronic medical illnesses, Opioid Addiction, once develop, has no cure and requires ongoing monitoring and treatment. Therapy alone and abstinence - base models rather than medication - assist treatment have dominated Opioid Treatment until now. Despite detoxification combined with psychosocial treatment, relapse rates remain at 90% or higher. 4 these high relapse rates have been confirmed in populations that abuse heroin as well as prescription opioids. 5 6 renew use after abstinence is associated with high overdose risk, likely result of loss of previous tolerance and misjudgment of safe amounts.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Introduction

Drug overdose deaths involving Prescription Opioid pain relievers have increased dramatically since 1999. Concert federal and state efforts have been made to curb this epidemic. In 2011, White House released an interagency strategy for Responding to America's Prescription Drug Crisis. Enacting this strategy, federal agencies have worked with States to educate providers, pharmacists, patients, parents, and youth about the dangers of Prescription Drug Abuse and the need for proper prescribing, dispensing, use, and disposal; to implement effective Prescription Drug monitoring programs; to facilitate proper medication disposal through Prescription take - back initiatives; and to support aggressive enforcement to address doctor shopping and pill mills and support development of Abuse - resistance formulations for Opioid pain relievers. Improvements have been seen in some regions of the country in the form of decreasing availability of Prescription Opioid Drugs and a decline in overdose deaths in States with the most aggressive policies. However, since 2007, overdose deaths related to heroin have started to increase. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention counted 10 574 heroin overdose deaths in 2014, which represents a more than fivefold increase in the heroin death rate from 2002 to 2014. In an effort to combat intertwined problems of Prescription Opioid Misuse and heroin use, in March of 2015, the Secretary of Health and Human Services announced Secretarys Opioid Initiative, which aims to reduce addiction and mortality related to Opioid Drug Abuse by: reforming Opioid prescribing practices, expanding access to overdose - reversal Drug naloxone expanding access to medication - assist treatment for Opioid Use disorder relationship between Prescription Opioid Abuse and increases in heroin Use in United States is under scrutiny. These substances are all part of the same Opioid Drug category and overlap in important ways. Currently available research demonstrate: Prescription Opioid use is a risk factor for heroin use. Heroin use is rare in Prescription Drug users. Prescription opioids and heroin have similar effects, different risk factors. A subset of people who abuse prescription opioids may progress to heroin use. Increase drug availability is associated with increased use and overdose. Heroin Use is driven by its low cost and high availability. Emphasis is needed on both prevention and treatment.


History

History and physical examination in patients with OUD vary depending on duration and intensity of use. Patients who sporadically misuse small doses of opioids may have completely normal physical exam and no clear historical findings. Patients with chronic oral opioid use may have sedation if actively using drug, along with miosis and hyperactive response to pain. Patients who are dependent on intravenous heroin may have many effects of injection drug abuse: history may be limited as patients are often not forthcoming when discussing substance abuse patterns. However, it is crucial to obtain detailed history of patients in whom OUD or its sequelae are suspect.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Opiate Drug Addiction

In the late 1990s, pharmaceutical companies reassured the medical community that patients would not become addicted to prescription opioid pain relievers, and healthcare providers began to prescribe them at greater rates. This subsequently led to widespread diversion and misuse of these medications before it became clear that these medications could indeed be highly addictive. 3 4 Opioid overdose rates begin to increase. In 2017, more than 47 000 Americans died as result of opioid overdose, including prescription opioids, heroin, and illicitly manufactured fentanyl, powerful synthetic opioid. 1 that same year, estimate 1. 7 million people in the United States suffer from substance use disorders related to prescription opioid pain relievers, and 652 000 suffer from heroin use disorder.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

What are opioids?

Opioids are a type of medicine often used to help relieve pain. They work by lowering the number of pain signals your body sends to your brain. They also change how your brain responds to pain. Doctors most often prescribe opioids to relieve pain from: toothaches and dental procedures, injuries, surgeries. Chronic conditions such as cancer, opioids are usually safe when you use them correctly. But people who do not follow their doctors ' instructions and those who misuse opioids can become addicted. Misusing opioids means that you do follow your doctors instructions for how to take medicine. It can also mean that you take drugs illegally.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Symptoms of opioid addiction

Opioid withdrawal symptoms can but wont necessarily include some of the following: drug cravings Anxiety / irritability Insomnia Abdominal pain Vomiting Diarrhea Tremors feeling cold opioid withdrawal symptoms generally last between three and five days, although they can last up to 10 days, according to the American Society of Addiction Medicine. Withdrawal from opioids can be difficult and even dangerous. Trying to quit cold turkey is not recommend, ASAM advises, because it can lead to stronger cravings and continued use. The safest way to alleviate opioid withdrawal symptoms is through medically supervised treatment that generally includes medicine counseling and support. Some medications used to relieve withdrawal symptoms are methadone and buprenorphine. These medications can also be used as long - term maintenance medicine for opioid dependence. In addition, medication called clonidine can be used during withdrawal to help reduce anxiety, agitation, muscle aches, sweating, runny nose and cramping. It does not help reduce cravings. Addiction Medicine physicians may also prescribe medication to treat vomiting and Diarrhea and help with Insomnia.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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