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Panasonic Vr

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Last Updated: 02 July 2021

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The problem with VR headsets is that they still all look like VR headsets glorify ski goggles that shut you off from the world. I am not going to say Panasonic has solved the matter altogether with its own VR Glasses at CES this year, but the project does represent something of an improvement. Basically, they are regular - ish glasses with a dash of Steampunk aviator style. Glasses and they are glasses, rather than headsets, also offer technical improvements over other solutions in market. Micro OLED panels, co - developed by Panasonic and Kopin, are extremely high resolution with almost no hint of the screen - door effect that plagues most VR hardware. Theyre also the first VR glasses to support HDR, which was particularly impressive during the CG demo of the interior of a Japanese temple, with light realistically bouncing off golden decorations. Panasonic has made use of its own audio technology in headset,ss with Technic drivers in earbuds providing rich, dynamic sound. Companies say it also uses optical designs from LUMIX camera division and similar signal processing technologies as found in its TVs and Blu - ray players. The prototype unit I tried had some clear limitations. Micro OLED panels were smaller than they could have been, resulting in a squarer image with a lower viewing angle than traditional VR headsets. Glasses were also a little front - heavy and slid down my nose whenever I tilted forward; this was helped by cables running directly out of eyepieces to gaming PC. The non - functioning mockup of the envisaged final product, which I also get to wear, solves these problems by being significantly lighter and running a single USB - C cable through the end of one of the Glasses ' arms. Panasonic is unlikely to ever sell these glasses as a consumer product. Instead, Its points to commercial applications that are likely to spring up alongside the rollout of 5G networks, such as Virtual travel and VR sports. Japanese companies are talking about this sort of thing a lot this year, given the Olympic Games in Tokyo and the fact that 5G services are yet to be launched in the country. But my main takeaway from the demo was that, hey, turns out it is possible to make VR glasses that are both better quality and with better form factor. It might not make for practical consumer product just yet, but it is intriguing to look at steps that could make VR technology more appealing to the mainstream audience.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Panasonic VR weight and limits

As prototype exists today, Pico VR Glasses would have been great Daydream - like headsets back in, say, 2017. But VR has evolved since then, and 3DOF tracking just feels like a huge step back. Even for casual, seated VR experiences, it is important for comfort and immersion to be able to track movements of user shifting in their seatnot, to mention how much it limits the kind of experiences a headset can support. For VR Glasses to be truly viable product in 2020 or beyond, Pico will need to figure out how to get some cameras on board to support 6DOF tracking on both head and hands. Inside - out tracking would also open the door to pass - through feature, and controller - less hand - tracking, which would probably be a great fit for VR Glasses considering the likely focus on causal, phone - base experiences. This is no easy feat though, especially considering extra power and computer requirements that such tracking would add, and the need to send that much more data back and forth between phone and headset. Once the right components come into place, Pico may have chops to pull this off though, considering the company is one of just a handful so far to have built a solid standalone 6DOF headset, its upcoming Pico Neo 2.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

What platform is this?

Osaka, Japan - Panasonic Corporation today announced that it has developed the world's first High Dynamic Range capable ultra - High definition virtual reality eyeglasses which boast comfortable fit that make users feel as if they were wearing eyeglasses. With anticipation of forthcoming full - fledge commercial services of fifth generation mobile communications system, number of new services using VR glasses are expected to be offer, including VR sports viewing and engaging virtual travel experiences. While conventional VR glasses with high - quality images and high sound quality provide users with highly immersive simulated experiences, these glasses tend to be big in size and require users to strap them to their head with a headband, which could cause wearer discomfort.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Big ideas, little hardware

It was important for Panasonic that it make that distinction of its prototype being virtual reality Glass rather than a virtual reality headset. Panasonic glasses provide some technical improvements over other VR hardware solutions that are already on the market. It is built with micro OLED display panels that have been co - developed by both Panasonic and Kopin. Glasses have very high resolution with no indication at all of screen - door effect which is still common in most virtual reality hardware. Panasonic glasses are also the first to support HDR. During the CES demonstration, this feature came out clearly in the CG demo of the inside of a Japanese temple which even showed light bouncing off golden decorations! Panasonic is also utilizing its own audio technology in VR glasses. It relies on Technic drivers that are in earbuds to deliver very rich and dynamic audio output. Panasonic also states that it uses optical designs from its Lumix camera division and other related signal processing technologies found in its Blu - ray players and TVs.


So, what's the problem?

During the course of CES, my colleague David Heaney described simply something that is hard to grasp about the market for AR head - worn gadgets: Recognizing occlusion in your environment is to AR what 6DOF tracking is to VR. This is to say that if an AR headset with see - through optics inserting digital content into your real - world environment cannot reliably understand when person or object blocks simulate content from your view, illusion meant to be provided by hardware is break. The same is true of VR headsets that do not track the position of your head. For example, if you wear an Oculus Go VR headset and decide to lean forward or stand up, illusion of VR that you were enjoying is instantly break. Discomfort or confusion often follows in either case of severely limited VR or AR, and this represents death sentence for hardware. Failing to provide 6DOF tracking, or recognize occlusion, is so uncomfortable, I believe some headset wearers are discouraged from wearing hardware ever again. Of course, some can learn to work around this limit. There are fans of Oculus Go who understand its limitations and use the device as a low - cost personal media viewer. Nreal AR glasses, for example, provide a relatively large field of view for similar genre of content. Still, without complete and constantly improving understanding of the environment around wearer, AR glasses like $500 Nreal are likely to consistently fail this test. Without passing this test walking out into the real world, appeal of these kinds of AR hardware platforms is minimal to developers, to businesses, and to consumers. I would agree that for AR glasses to be truly useful and game - changing, they would need not only solid 6DOF tracking, object occlusion, and object permanence but also really intuitive and reliable 6DOF input which was not also show, Chennavasin write. I appreciate the effort being made by all companies, but it still looks like consumer AR is still years away. This roadblock for AR relates to two others power consumption and field of view. Most AR glasses fail to deliver anything close to the amount of digital content that your eyes see through most VR headset designs. This means that even in HoloLens 2 and Magic Leap 1, two dedicated AR headsets, you need to move far away from digital content to get full view of it and truly enjoy the sense of immersion it bring. Again, some can get used to this limitation, but the bulky size and high price of these AR systems also prevent them from appealing to consumers. Lastly, building the most detailed map of your environment typically means on - board cameras need to keep scanning room to keep map update. Using those cameras drains power. One of the key reasons the first generation of phone - power VR headsets were retired so quickly is because those headsets drain power from device you need to last day for other tasks.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

So, what's the problem?

At CES 2020 in Las Vegas, Panasonic unveiled what they claim are the world's first High Dynamic Range Ultra HD VR eyeglasses. The biggest problem with VR and 360 is resolution. If you do have enough resolutions, then the whole experience becomes lackluster. This goes for both capture and display. Up until now, VR headsets and eyeglasses have generally been limited to lower resolutions. Well, now, Panasonic has unveiled an Ultra HD set that they hope will help to increase the overall enjoyment of the VR experience. With mobile communications systems now starting to appear, number of new services using VR glasses are expected to be offer. These will include VR sports viewing and engaging virtual travel experiences. Conventional VR glasses with high - quality images and high sound quality provide users with highly immersive simulated experiences, but these glasses tend to be big in size and require users to strap them to their head with a headband, which does make them comfortable to wear. For its new VR glasses, Panasonic has developed a high - performance display device in cooperation with Kopin Corporation, leading manufacturer of display devices for VR glasses. Panasonic audio and visual technologies have been incorporated into eyeglasses, including signal processing technologies cultivated through development of video equipment such as TVs and Blu - ray Disc players, acoustic technologies of Technics audio products, and optical technologies used in LUMIX digital cameras. These technologies have enabled Panasonic to create compact and lightweight VR glasses that offer high - quality images and optimal sound, while most importantly, providing comfort for user. Matthew Allard is multi - Award - winning, ACS accredited freelance Director of Photography with 30 years experience working in more than 50 countries around world. He is Editor of newsshooter. Com and has been writing on site since 2010. Matthew has won 41 ACS Awards, including four prestigious Golden Tripods. In 2016 he won the award for Best Cinematography at 21 Asian Television Awards. Matthew is available for hire as a DP in Japan or for work anywhere else in the world.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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