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Popular Urban Legends

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Last Updated: 02 July 2021

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Urban Legends, including tales of Bigfoot and Loch Ness Monster, have been thrilling people for decades. Insider Data uses Wikipedia analytics to determine which cryptids people can't get enough of. Yeti, Sasquatch, and Mothman are just a few of the most-discussed legendary creatures. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Urban Legends have enchanted people around the world for centuries. Plenty of people are obsessed with the idea of spotting Nessie, or finding Bigfoot. In fact, some even study cryptozoology, which Merriam-Webster defines as study of and search for legendary animals. Basically, folkloric creatures whose existence have yet to be prove. Using analytics from Wikipedia pages of cryptozoological creatures, Insider Data determines which Urban Legends Americans can't stop talking about, based on how many edits pages of cryptids receive, as well as how frequently pages are edit. Bigfoot, Loch Ness Monster, and Yeti are among the most popular Urban Legends, according to findings. Other cryptids that people can't get enough of are Mothman, Mongolian Death Worm, and Jersey Devil. Keep reading to explore the stories behind 20 of the most popular Legends and their accompanying cryptids. One of the most infamous Urban Legends is the tale of Bigfoot, which is purportedly a large, hairy, ape-like creature that roams forests in the US. Search for Bigfoot, also called Sasquatch, makes this legend among the most-discuss in America. Using data from Bigfoot Field Researchers Organization, which documents all reported Sasquatch spottings, Travel Channel found that there have been about 23 000 sightings of Bigfoot in the US over the years, with Washington having 2 032 reports, and California reporting 1 697 sightings. There have also been hundreds of supposed spottings of Sasquatch Monster document in Kentucky since the early 19th century, most recently by a couple camping in Kentucky's Mammoth Cave National Park who were awake by a man who claimed he had seen the Beast. According to Scottish folklore, monster know as Nessie, or Loch Ness Monster, lurks in Lake Loch Ness in the Scottish Highlands. According to Encyclopedia Britannica, sightings of her may go back to Pict, as stone carvings of the mysterious Beast with flippers have been discover. The earliest written mention of Legend comes from the year 565, when a man known as Saint Columba spotted a Monster in Loch Ness that was going to attack man swimming in the Lake. Legend has it that Columba successfully commanded the Monster to retreat, according to PBS. In the 1930s, legend of Loch Ness Monster grew in popularity and though some scientists claim Loch Ness Monster may be giant eel, legend is still widely held on today. In fact, Nessie has been estimated to bring Scotland £40. 7 million in tourism money annually. Yeti, also know as Abominable Snowman, is supposedly a large and hairy human-like entity that roams the Himalayas.

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* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

A new day

Have you heard one about a guy who went on holiday to Bolivia? You know, he goes on a night out and randomly wakes up in an ice-fill bathtub after someone had removed his kidney and harvested it for sale. You probably have-it is a popular urban legend. Also know as urban myths or contemporary legends, urban legends refer to widely disseminate, unproven stories of unusual or peculiar events that typically convey cautionary advisements or warnings. They often evoke strong emotional reactions such as horror, shock, revulsion and humour. But how is it that we still buy these tales in the 21st century? Retelling of urban legends over time ensures that they become part of the public record and explains why they are so well know. Common examples include Bloody Mary-a woman who was once supposedly executed for being a witch and who will show her face in the mirror if you call on her. Hookman, which tells the story of a killer with a hook for hand attacking a couple in a parked car, and Vanishing Hitchhiker are also well-known legends. The strange thing is that notoriety and disproof do not prevent urban legends from resurfacing after going out of fashion for some time. Indeed, enduring gang initiation urban legend has recently re-emerge in this way. This is claim that, as part of initiation, gang members driving at night without headlights will pursue and shoot occupants of any car which flashes them warning. Psychologically, urban legends are a way for us to make sense of the world and manage threats in a safe environment. From the perspective of believers, myths act as proof and reinforce existing beliefs. This is important because they help to validate people's worldview and, in doing so, legitimatise their fears as real and genuine. Urban legends also provide a source of entertainment. Sharing them is an important form of social engagement. Passing apparently important information can make people feel helpful, despite lack of evidence. Within modern society, due to email and the internet, urban legends have spread even more rapidly and indefinitely-constantly adapting to retain relevance, coherence and significance. With these changes have come a generation of new viral urban legends. You may have heard a story about two people who have cybersex only to realise months later that they are father and daughter. Another viral one is Slender Man, creepy character who hangs around in forests and stalks children. This originated in 2009 on an internet forum as part of a Photoshop challenge in which participants edit photographs of everyday objects to make them appear paranormal. Slender Man has since become an internet meme and been referenced in both video games and art. However, his popularity caused minor moral panic after it was discovered that violent attackers had been inspired by it. Nonetheless, he illustrates how the internet facilitates rapid transmission and growth of urban legends.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

1. Bloody Mary

Bloody Mary, Bloody Mary, Bloodyeven joking about Mirror specter give me chills. One of the most popular urban legends is that of Bloody Mary, spirit of woman who can be summon by repeating her name thirteen times into dimly lit Mirror. For whatever reason, this practice has persisted across generations, with research on the topic beginning in 1978 when Jane Langlois wrote about the game as she came to call it and its origins. In 2014, Italian researchers explored the science and psychology behind Bloody Mary, ultimately adding a bit of credibility to the legend. If this story is true, then it essentially proves witchcraft, ghosts, and afterlife; truly extraordinary claim. A surprising number of adults will admit to at least hearing about the infamous Bloody Mary and the Ritual to summon her at least once in their lives. If any of these individuals are like me, story was told at a sleepover or campfire by a friend or older peer. As with most legends stories start with a friend of friend or my cousin's friend, to add validity and personality to the story, attempt ritual. Alan Dundes writes in his article Bloody Mary in Mirror: Ritual Reflection of Pre-Pubescent Anxiety that most participants are young girls at sleepovers who decide to try and summon Bloody Mary, or her alias Mary Worth, as she is commonly believed to be a witch who was burnt for practicing magic. Some modern iterations believe she is a young woman who died in a car accident, in some stories specific lines need to be utter, and in different regions different images are said to appear. Whatever name or story process remains the same regardless of region or era, somebody walks into a room with a mirror and utters phrase until an image appears behind them. It is important to understand how legends spread, According to a Washington Post piece, it is due in part to word-of-mouth and practicality of concept. Word-of-mouth is precisely what I spoke of previously, sitting around campfire and sharing stories. In same way, stories of murderers in the backseat or phone calls from inside of house persist in our culture. We latch to stories that are told to us in appropriate setting. The Another essential part is that the story must make sense to us or at very least seem fun or interesting. We discount alien abductions and flat earth because they inherently sound ridiculous, which whether or not we should is different Post entirely, but when we hear a girl had a killer in her backseat it seems just real enough for us to go along with. Post on Conversation elaborate that urban legends play on our social fears and insecurities, People are afraid of being kidnap, murder, and ultimately stalked by witchs spirit.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

2. The spider bite

This urban legend from the 1960s reads like a nightmare-come-true for arachnophobics, but fortunately for them it simply isn't true. Spiders, need say, write University of Washington arachnid expert Rod Crawford, do not find the human body suitable site for egg laying, and no actual case of anything like this can be found anywhere in scientific or medical literature. Bodily insect infestations are a recurring theme in folklore, however. Have you heard one about a child who fell asleep while eating cookies in bed and woke up with ant colony in his brain? Or young lady so enamored of her own beehive hairdo in the 1960s that she refused to wash it and died of spider infestation?

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

3. The hookman

Urban legends are fascinating. Theyre proof that the art of oral storytelling is far from dead. Everyone at some point has sat down as some narrator engross them in a terrifying tale that could have grown right in their hometown. Youve of course heard of Bloody Mary, fiend that she appear in your mirror if you chant her name three times in a row. Or maybe youre more familiar with the Hook Man legend, one whose psychotic star has ghoulish appendage. Which is scariest? The origins of the Bloody Mary legend are still unclear. Some surmise it stems from the notorious Elizabeth Bathory, Hungarian countess said to have murdered virgins and bath in their blood to remain youthful. Others point to Queen Mary I, aforementioned crazy British Queen, for all the blood she shed during her reign. Others say she was witch executed during the Salem witch trials. Whatever case, you may poo-poo this legend now, but try doing it yourself in the dark later on. Bet you, you wo This one is for all you couples making out in cars. Taking setting outside of bathroom, Hook Man legend follows the story of a couple getting frisky in a car. Suddenly, the mood breaks when an announcer on the radio warns how lunatic with Hook for hand has escaped from asylum. Some versions say couple hears scratching on door while other finds girl in story discovering her boys mutilated body. Whichever version, Hook Man remains the leading character.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

7. Location, location, location

With all this talk of bizarre things on or in the water, it makes you wonder what else might be down there. One famous Lake monster, somewhere in the deep, clear waters of Torch Lake, has been preying on unsuspecting visitors and campers of YMCA Camp Hayo-go-Ha for generations. Dave Foley, counselor at Camp in the 1960s and 70s, takes credit for starting the myth, which was later popularized in a song by fellow counselor and folk musician Bob Thurston. One eye is brown, one eye is blue / His body is covered all in icky green goo, lyrics sing. The presence of 50-pound muskies in the Lake likely contributed to his tale. But another legend speaks of sea panther, claiming that Torch Lake contains monster with the head of a cat and the body of a lizard. Do Foley make up a monster story to entertain campers, only to stumble upon something even scarier? Cook clearly underestimated this legend, as people quickly started calling in to corroborate stories of their encounters. One man recalls an incident with a beast from 1938, when he was approached by a pack of dogs. Several scattered when he fired his rifle into the air, but one simply stood up tall and glared at him before sprinting away. The first reports of Dogman date back to 1887, when two lumberjacks saw a creature with a man's body and dog's head, but there are also similar reports from French fur traders dating as far back as the early 1800s. An unusual animal attack in the nearby town of Luther in 1997 seemed to confirm Cooks prediction of a ten-year cycle for Dogman attacks, but video evidence of an attack in 2007 turned out to be a hoax. With the next round of Dogman sightings expected in 2017, will modern technology finally allow us to capture proof of this beast when it appears and will you be brave enough to face it when it does

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

10. The Slender Man

You can go deeeep into the Legend of Slender Man right this way, but here's TL; DR version: He's scary man with super long floppy arms who lives in the woods and preys on children. Slender Man is 100 percent not real, but this fake story made its way into urban Legend so fast and furiously that kids started believing he was real. In fact, there have been multiple crimes attributed to Slender Manincluding, high-profile case of two girls who were accused of stabbing their classmate in his name.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Chupacabra

Probably one of the more famous urban legends, harrowing story go that girl is babysitting one night in a huge house. After putting the children to bed, she settled down to watch TV but FIND herself getting freaked OUT by a clown statue watching her from the corner of the room. She tried to ignore it but having fear of clowns, she decided to call her parents to ask if she could move it. But in a chilling twist, dad frantically told her to grab kids and run OUT of the house to next door neighbour where she should call police. Once she is safely out, distraught family tell her children have been complaining about clown watching them at night. And here's part that will haunt your nightmares-family doesn't own a clown statue and have actually been stalked for weeks by a killer on loose.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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