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Python Print Timestamp

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Last Updated: 21 October 2020

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General | Latest Info

Dealing With Dates and Times in Python can be a hassle. Thankfully, there is a build - in way of making it easier: Python datetime module. Datetime helps us identify and process time - related elements like dates, hours, minutes, seconds, days of week, months, years, etc. It offers various services like managing time zones and daylight savings time. It can work with timestamp data. It can extract day of week, day of month, and other date and time formats from strings. In short, it is a really powerful way of handling anything date and time related in Python. So let's get into it! In this tutorial, you learn about Python datetime functions in detail, including: creating Date Objects Getting years and months from Date Getting months, days and Weekdays from Date Getting hours and minutes from Date Getting Weeks number of year from Date Converting Date object into timestamp Converting UNIX timestamp string to Date object Handling timedelta Objects Getting difference between two Dates and Times Formatting Dates: strftime and strptime Handling timezones Working With Pandas datetime Objects Getting year, month, day, hour, and minute Getting Weekday and day of year Converting Date Objects into DataFrame index as you Work through this tutorial, wed encourage you to run code on your own machine. Alternatively, if you like to run code in your browser and learn in an interactive fashion with answer - checking to be sure you are getting it right, our Python intermediate course has lessons on datetime in Python that we recommend. You can start learning by signing up for a free user account. We can see from the results above that datetime_object is indeed datetime object of datetime class. This includes year, month, day, hour, minute, second, and microsecond. Note that strptime takes two arguments: string and% y -% m -% d, another string that tells strptime how to interpret input string my_string.% Y, for example, tell it to expect the first four characters of string to be year. A full list of these patterns is available in the documentation, and well go into these methods in more depth later in this tutorial. You may also have noticed that time of 00: 00: 00pm has been added to the date. That is because we create a datetime object, which must include date and time. 00: 00: 00 is the default time that will be assigned if no time is designated in string were inputting. Anyway, we were hoping to separate out specific elements of date for our analysis. One way can do that is using built - in class attributes of datetime object, like. Month or. Year: now we can see that Python starts weeks on Monday and counts from index 0 rather than starting at 1. So it makes sense that number 3 is converted to Thursday as we saw above. Note that in the ISO calendar, week starts counting from 1, so here 5 represent the correct day of week: Friday.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Introduction

The way date and time are represented may be different in different places, organizations etc. It's more common to use mm / dd / yyyy in the US, whereas dd / mm / yyyy is more common in the UK. The strftime method is defined under class date, datetime and time. The method creates format string from give date, datetime or time object. When you run a program, output will be something like: here,% Y,% m,% d,% H etc. There are format codes. The strftime method takes one or more format codes and returns formatted string based on it. In the above program, t, s1 and s2 are strings.% Y - year% m - month% d - day% H - hour% S - second to learn more about strftime and format codes, visit: Python strftime. The Strptime method creates a datetime object from give string. The string representing date and time format code is equivalent to the first argument by way,% d,% B and% Y format codes are used for day, month and year respectively.

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* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Conclusion

Unix Time is how computers count time, but it would be incredibly inefficient for humans to determine time by calculating the number of seconds from arbitrary date. Instead, we work in terms of years, months, days, and so forth. But even with these conventions in place, another layer of complexity stems from the fact that different languages and cultures have different ways of writing date. For instance, in the United States, dates are usually written starting with month, then day, then year. This means that January 31, 2020, is written as 01 - 31 - 2020. This closely matches the long - form written version of the date. However, most of Europe and many other areas write dates starting with day, then month, then year. This means that January 31 2020, is written as 31 - 01 - 2020. These differences can cause all sorts of confusion when communicating across cultures. To help avoid communication mistakes, International Organization for Standardization developed ISO 8601. This Standard specifies that all dates should be written in order of most - to - least - significant data. This mean format is year, month, day, hour, minute, and second: in this example, YYYY represents four - digit year, and MM and DD are two - digit month and day, starting with zero if necessary. After that, HH, MM, and SS represent two - digit hours, minutes, and seconds, starting with zero if necessary. The advantage of this format is that date can be represented with no ambiguity. Dates written as DD - MM - YYYY or MM - DD - YYYY can be misinterpreted if day is a valid month number. Youll see little later on how you can use the ISO 8601 format with Python datetime.


Creating Python datetime Instances #

Python datetime instances support two types of operation, naive and aware. The basic difference between them is that naive instances do contain time zone information, whereas aware instances do. More formally, to quote Python documentation: this is an important distinction for working with Python datetime. Aware datetime instance can compare itself unambiguously to other aware datetime instances and will always return correct time interval when used in arithmetic operations. Naive datetime instances, on other hand, may be ambiguous. One example of this ambiguity relates to daylight saving time. Areas that practice daylight saving time turn clocks forward one hour in spring and backward one hour in fall. This typically happens at 2: 00 AM local time. In spring, hours from 2: 00 AM to 2: 59 AM never happen, and in fall, hours from 1: 00 AM to 1: 59 AM happen twice! Practically, what happens is that offset from UTC in these time zones changes throughout the year. Iana tracks these changes and catalogs them in different database files that your computer has installed. Using a library like dateutil, which uses IANA database under hood, is a great way to make sure that your code properly handles arithmetic with time. This doesnt mean that you always need to be aware of datetime instances. But aware instances are crucial if youre comparing times with each other, especially if youre comparing times in different parts of the world.


Starting Your PyCon Countdown #

Now you have enough information to start working on the countdown clock for next year's PyCon US! Pycon US 2021 will start on May 12 2021 in Pittsburgh, PA. With the 2020 event having been cancel, many Pythonistas are extra excited about next year's gathering. This is a great way to keep track of how long youll need to wait and boost your datetime skills at the same time! To get start, create a file called pyconcd. Py and add this code: in this code, you import datetime from datetime and define a constant, PYCON_DATE, that stores the date of the next PyCon US. You dont expect the date of PyCon to change, so you name variable in all caps to indicate that its constant. Next, you compute the difference between datetime. Now, which is current time, and PYCON_DATE. Taking the difference between two datetime instances returns datetime. Timedelta instance. Timedelta instances represent change in time between two datetime instances. Delta in name is a reference to the Greek letter delta, which is used in science and engineering to mean change. Youll learn more later about how to use timedelta for more general arithmetic operations. Finally, print output, as of April 9 2020 at little before 9: 30 PM is: only 397 days until PyCon US 2021! This output is a little clunky, so later on youll see how you can improve formatting. If you run this script on different day, youll get different output. If you run script after May 12 2021 at 8: 00 AM, youll get a negative amount of time remaining!

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

8.1.1. Available Types A

Convert datetime format into seconds,% d /% M /% Y% H:% M:% S > Time. Mktimed. Timetuple 1376632303. 0 Also see Python Create unix timestamp five minutes in the future. Starting from Python 3. 3 This has become super easy with datetime. Timestamp method. This oF course will only be useful if you need number of seconds from 1970 - 01 - 01 UTC. From datetime import datetime dt = datetime. Today get timezone naive now second = dt. Timestamp 8. 1 datetime Basic date and Time types, minute IS converted to 60 seconds. An hour IS converted to 3600 seconds. Return local date corresponding to POSIX timestamp, such as IS returnedaA by Rohit Python Time Function IS used for getting time. In Python, to use oF Time Function, you need to import Time Modules, no Third Party Library is require. Python Time Function returns Time in seconds floating point number since epoch, in UTC how to convert Time string to seconds in Python, Kite IS free autocomplete for Python developers. Code faster With Kite plugin for your Code editor, featuring Line - oF - Code Completions and cloudlessA Create Function to convert in seconds and then use list comprehension. From datetime import datetime, timedelta import random Generate some random datetime objects. D = def dt_to_secondsdt: return 3600 * dt. Hour + 60 * dt. Minute + dt. Second S = tuple

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

8.1.2. timedelta Objects A

Instance attributes (read-only):

AttributeValue
daysBetween -999999999 and 999999999 inclusive
secondsBetween 0 and 86399 inclusive
microsecondsBetween 0 and 999999 inclusive

Timedelta object represents duration, difference between two dates or times. Class datetime. Timedelta All arguments are optional and default to 0. Arguments may be integers or floats, and may be positive or negative. Only days, seconds and microseconds are stored internally. Arguments are converted to those units: millisecond is converted to 1000 microseconds. Minute is converted to 60 seconds. An hour is converted to 3600 seconds. The week is converted to 7 days. And days, seconds and microseconds are then normalized so that representation is unique, with 0 < = microseconds < 1000000 0 < = second < 3600 * 24 - 999999999 < = days < = 999999999 If any argument is float and there are fractional microseconds, fractional microseconds leave over from all arguments are combine and their sum is round to nearest microsecond. If no argument is float, conversion and normalization processes are exact. If the normalized value of days lies outside the indicated range, OverflowError is raise. Note that normalization of negative values may be surprising at first. For example, > from datetime import timedelta > d = timedelta > timedelta. Most negative timedelta object, timedelta. Timedelta. Max's most positive timedelta object, timedelta. Timedelta. Resolution smallest possible difference between non - equal timedelta objects, timedelta. Note that, because of normalization, timedelta. Max > - timedelta. Min. - Timedelta. Max is not representable as timedelta object. This is exact, but may overflow. This is exact, and cannot overflow. Division by 0 raises ZeroDivisionError. - Timedelta. Max is not representable as timedelta object. String representations of timedelta objects are normalized similarly to their internal representation. This leads to somewhat unusual results for negative timedeltas. For example: > timedelta datetime. Timedelta > print - 1 day, 19: 00: 00 in addition to operations list above, timedelta objects support certain additions and subtractions with date and datetime objects. Comparisons of timedelta objects are supported with timedelta objects representing smaller duration considered to be smaller timedelta. In order to stop mixed - type comparisons from falling back to default comparison by object address, when timedelta object is compared to an object of different type, TypeError is raised unless the comparison is = or! =. Latter cases return False or True, respectively. Timedelta objects are hashable, support efficient pickling, and in Boolean contexts, timedelta object is considered to be true if and only if it isnt equal to timedelta. Timedelta. Total_seconds Return total number of seconds contained in duration. Equivalent to td / timedelta. Note that for very large time intervals, this method will lose microsecond accuracy. New in version 3.

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Supported operations:

OperationResult
t1 = t2 + t3Sum of t2 and t3 . Afterwards t1 - t2 == t3 and t1 - t3 == t2 are true. (1)
t1 = t2 - t3Difference of t2 and t3 . Afterwards t1 == t2 - t3 and t2 == t1 + t3 are true. (1)
t1 = t2 i or t1 = i t2Delta multiplied by an integer. Afterwards t1 // i == t2 is true, provided i != 0 .
In general, t1 i == t1 (i-1) + t1 is true. (1)
t1 = t2 f or t1 = f t2Delta multiplied by a float. The result is rounded to the nearest multiple of timedelta.resolution using round-half-to-even.
f = t2 / t3Division (3) of t2 by t3 . Returns a float object.
t1 = t2 / f or t1 = t2 / iDelta divided by a float or an int. The result is rounded to the nearest multiple of timedelta.resolution using round-half-to-even.
t1 = t2 // i or t1 = t2 // t3The floor is computed and the remainder (if any) is thrown away. In the second case, an integer is returned. (3)
t1 = t2 % t3The remainder is computed as a timedelta object. (3)
q, r = divmod(t1, t2)Computes the quotient and the remainder: q = t1 // t2 (3) and r = t1 % t2 . q is an integer and r is a timedelta object.
+t1Returns a timedelta object with the same value. (2)
-t1equivalent to timedelta (- t1.days , - t1.seconds , - t1.microseconds ), and to t1 -1. (1)(4)
abs(t)equivalent to + t when t.days >= 0 , and to - t when t.days < 0 . (2)
str(t)Returns a string in the form , H:MM:SS , where D is negative for negative t . (5)
repr(t)Returns a string in the form datetime.timedelta(D) , where D is negative for negative t . (5)
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8.1.3. date Objects A

Supported operations:

OperationResult
date2 = date1 + timedeltadate2 is timedelta.days days removed from date1 . (1)
date2 = date1 - timedeltaComputes date2 such that date2 + timedelta == date1 . (2)
timedelta = date1 - date2(3)
date1 < date2date1 is considered less than date2 when date1 precedes date2 in time. (4)

The Date object represents the date in the idealized calendar, current Gregorian calendar indefinitely extends in both directions. January 1st of year 1 is call day number 1, January 2nd of year 1 is call day number 2, and so on. This matches the definition of the proleptic Gregorian calendar in Dershowitz and Reingolds book Calendrical Calculations, where its base calendar for all computations. See book For algorithms for converting between proleptic Gregorian ordinals and many other calendar systems. Class datetime. Date All arguments are require. Arguments may be integers, in following ranges: MINYEAR < = year < = MAXYEAR 1 < = month < = 12 1 < = day < = number of days in give month and year If argument outside those ranges is give, ValueError is Raise. Classmethod date. Today Return current local date. This is equivalent to date. Fromtimestamptime. Time. Classmethod date. Fromtimestamp Return local date corresponding to POSIX timestamp, such as is Return by time. Time. This may raise OverflowError, if timestamp is out of range of values supported by platform C localtime function, and OSError on localtime failure. It is common for this to be restricted to years from 1970 through 2038. Note that on non - POSIX systems that include leap seconds in their notion of timestamp, leap seconds are ignored by fromtimestamp. Change to version 3. 3: Raise OverflowError instead of ValueError If timestamp is out of range of values supported by platform C localtime function. Raise OSError instead of ValueError on localtime failure. Classmethod date. Fromordinal return date corresponds to proleptic Gregorian ordinal, where January 1 of year 1 has ordinal 1. Valueerror is Raise unless 1 < = ordinal < = date. Max. Toordinal. For any date date. Fromordinald. Toordinal = d. Date. Earliest representable date, date. Date. Max latest representable date, date. Date. Resolution smallest possible difference between non - equal date objects, timedelta. Date. Year between MINYEAR and MAXYEAR inclusive. Date. Months Between 1 and 12 inclusive. Date. Day Between 1 and number of days in give month of give year. Date2 is moved forward in time If timedelta. Days > 0, or backward if timedelta. Days < 0. Afterward date2 - date1 = timedelta. Days. Timedelta. Second and timedelta. Microseconds are ignore. Overflowerror is Raise If date2. The year would be smaller than MINYEAR or larger than MAXYEAR. This isnt quite equivalent to date1 +, because - timedelta in isolation can overflow in cases where date1 - timedelta do not. Timedelta. Second and timedelta. Microseconds are ignore. This is exact, and cannot overflow. Timedelta. Second and timedelta. Microseconds are 0, and date2 + timedelta = date1 after. In other words, date1 < date2 If and only If date1. Toordinal < date2. Toordinal. In order to stop comparison from falling back to the default scheme of comparing object addresses, date comparison normally Raise TypeError if other comparand isnt also date object. However, NotImplemented is Return instead if other comparison has timetuple attribute.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

8.1.8. strftime() and strptime() Behavior A

Table

DirectiveMeaningExampleNotes
%aWeekday as locales abbreviated name.Sun, Mon, ..., Sat (en_US); So, Mo, ..., Sa (de_DE)(1)
%AWeekday as locales full name.Sunday, Monday, ..., Saturday (en_US); Sonntag, Montag, ..., Samstag (de_DE)(1)
%wWeekday as a decimal number, where 0 is Sunday and 6 is Saturday.0, 1, ..., 6
%dDay of the month as a zero-padded decimal number.01, 02, ..., 31
%bMonth as locales abbreviated name.Jan, Feb, ..., Dec (en_US); Jan, Feb, ..., Dez (de_DE)(1)
%BMonth as locales full name.January, February, ..., December (en_US); Januar, Februar, ..., Dezember (de_DE)(1)
%mMonth as a zero-padded decimal number.01, 02, ..., 12
%yYear without century as a zero-padded decimal number.00, 01, ..., 99
%YYear with century as a decimal number.0001, 0002, ..., 2013, 2014, ..., 9998, 9999(2)
%HHour (24-hour clock) as a zero-padded decimal number.00, 01, ..., 23
%IHour (12-hour clock) as a zero-padded decimal number.01, 02, ..., 12
%pLocales equivalent of either AM or PM.AM, PM (en_US); am, pm (de_DE)(1), (3)
%MMinute as a zero-padded decimal number.00, 01, ..., 59
%SSecond as a zero-padded decimal number.00, 01, ..., 59(4)
%fMicrosecond as a decimal number, zero-padded on the left.000000, 000001, ..., 999999(5)
%zUTC offset in the form +HHMM or -HHMM (empty string if the the object is naive).(empty), +0000, -0400, +1030(6)
%ZTime zone name (empty string if the object is naive).(empty), UTC, EST, CST
%jDay of the year as a zero-padded decimal number.001, 002, ..., 366
%UWeek number of the year (Sunday as the first day of the week) as a zero padded decimal number. All days in a new year preceding the first Sunday are considered to be in week 0.00, 01, ..., 53(7)
%WWeek number of the year (Monday as the first day of the week) as a decimal number. All days in a new year preceding the first Monday are considered to be in week 0.00, 01, ..., 53(7)
%cLocales appropriate date and time representation.Tue Aug 16 21:30:00 1988 (en_US); Di 16 Aug 21:30:00 1988 (de_DE)(1)
%xLocales appropriate date representation.08/16/88 (None); 08/16/1988 (en_US); 16.08.1988 (de_DE)(1)
%XLocales appropriate time representation.21:30:00 (en_US); 21:30:00 (de_DE)(1)
%%A literal '%' character.%

The following is a list of all format codes that the 1989 C standard require, and these work on all platforms with standard C implementation. Several additional directives not required by C89 standard are included for convenience. These parameters all correspond to ISO 8601 date values. These may not be available on all platforms when used with strftime method. Iso 8601 year and ISO 8601 week directives are not interchangeable with the year and week number directives above. Calling strptime with incomplete or ambiguous ISO 8601 directives will raise ValueError. The full set of format codes support varies across platforms, because Python calls platform C libraryas strftime function, and platform variations are common. To see the full set of format codes supported on your platform, consult strftime documentation.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

Table2

DirectiveMeaningExampleNotes
%aWeekday as localeas abbreviated name.Sun, Mon, a, Sat (en_US); So, Mo, a, Sa (de_DE)(1)
%AWeekday as localeas full name.Sunday, Monday, a, Saturday (en_US); Sonntag, Montag, a, Samstag (de_DE)(1)
%wWeekday as a decimal number, where 0 is Sunday and 6 is Saturday.0, 1, a, 6
%dDay of the month as a zero-padded decimal number.01, 02, a, 31(9)
%bMonth as localeas abbreviated name.Jan, Feb, a, Dec (en_US); Jan, Feb, a, Dez (de_DE)(1)
%BMonth as localeas full name.January, February, a, December (en_US); Januar, Februar, a, Dezember (de_DE)(1)
%mMonth as a zero-padded decimal number.01, 02, a, 12(9)
%yYear without century as a zero-padded decimal number.00, 01, a, 99(9)
%YYear with century as a decimal number.0001, 0002, a, 2013, 2014, a, 9998, 9999(2)
%HHour (24-hour clock) as a zero-padded decimal number.00, 01, a, 23(9)
%IHour (12-hour clock) as a zero-padded decimal number.01, 02, a, 12(9)
%pLocaleas equivalent of either AM or PM.AM, PM (en_US); am, pm (de_DE)(1), (3)
%MMinute as a zero-padded decimal number.00, 01, a, 59(9)
%SSecond as a zero-padded decimal number.00, 01, a, 59(4), (9)
%fMicrosecond as a decimal number, zero-padded on the left.000000, 000001, a, 999999(5)
%zUTC offset in the form AHHMM (empty string if the object is naive).(empty), +0000, -0400, +1030, +063415, -030712.345216(6)
%ZTime zone name (empty string if the object is naive).(empty), UTC, GMT(6)
%jDay of the year as a zero-padded decimal number.001, 002, a, 366(9)
%UWeek number of the year (Sunday as the first day of the week) as a zero padded decimal number. All days in a new year preceding the first Sunday are considered to be in week 0.00, 01, a, 53(7), (9)
%WWeek number of the year (Monday as the first day of the week) as a decimal number. All days in a new year preceding the first Monday are considered to be in week 0.00, 01, a, 53(7), (9)
%cLocaleas appropriate date and time representation.Tue Aug 16 21:30:00 1988 (en_US); Di 16 Aug 21:30:00 1988 (de_DE)(1)
%xLocaleas appropriate date representation.08/16/88 (None); 08/16/1988 (en_US); 16.08.1988 (de_DE)(1)
%XLocaleas appropriate time representation.21:30:00 (en_US); 21:30:00 (de_DE)(1)
%%A literal '%' character.%

Table3

DirectiveMeaningExampleNotes
%GISO 8601 year with century representing the year that contains the greater part of the ISO week ( %V ).0001, 0002, a, 2013, 2014, a, 9998, 9999(8)
%uISO 8601 weekday as a decimal number where 1 is Monday.1, 2, a, 7
%VISO 8601 week as a decimal number with Monday as the first day of the week. Week 01 is the week containing Jan 4.01, 02, a, 53(8), (9)
* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Python Time as an Object #

Epoch uses UTC for its definition rather than Time zone. Therefore, seconds elapse since the epoch is not variable depending on your geographical location. However, same cannot be said of struct_time. Object representation of Python Time may or may not take your time zone into account. There are two ways to convert float representing seconds to struct_time: UTC Local Time to convert Python Time float to UTC - base struct_time, Python Time module provides a function called gmtime. You use this call to discover your systems epoch. Now, you have a better foundation for understanding what is actually happening here. Gmtime converts the number of elapsed seconds since epoch to struct_time in UTC. In this case, youve passed 0 as number of seconds, meaning youre trying to find the epoch, itself, in UTC. As you saw before, struct_time cannot represent fractional seconds, so gmtime ignores fractional seconds in argument: notice that even though the number of seconds you passed was very close to 2,. 99 fractional seconds were simply ignore, as shown by tm_sec = 1. Secs parameter for gmtime is optional, meaning you can call gmtime with no arguments. Doing so will provide current Time in UTC: interestingly, there is no inverse for this function within Time. Instead, you have to look in the Python calendar module for the function name timegm:. Timegm takes tuple and returns corresponding number of seconds since epoch. Working with UTC is valuable in programming because of its standard. You do have to worry about DST, time zone, or locale information. That say, there are plenty of cases when you want to use Local Time. Next, youll see how to convert from seconds to Local Time so that you can do just that.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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