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Recurring Fever Flu

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Last Updated: 02 July 2021

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The cold and flu are both respiratory infections, but theyre are caused by different viruses. The Cold can be caused by more than 200 distinct viruses, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, while there are only a handful of viruses that cause flu. Flu is usually more intense than common cold, says the CDC. Cold symptoms tend to develop gradually, while flu symptoms can come on suddenly, without warning, per the CDC. Learn More About Differences Between Cold and Flu Cold symptoms can differ from person to person, but they generally appear about one to three days after exposure to cold-causing virus. In most cases, cold symptoms will peak within two to three days. Signs that you have a cold usually develop slowly. The most common cold symptoms include fatigue, sore or scratchy throat, nasal congestion or stuffiness, and runny nose, followed by sneezing and coughing. Fever is not typical with cold, but low-grade fever isnt out of the question, according to Merck Manual. Mucus discharged by runny nose may change color over the course of illness, starting out clear and becoming thicker, yellow, or green. Postnasal drip, in which mucus accumulates or drips in the back of the throat, can further aggravate sore throat or cough. Symptoms usually disappear in 4 to 10 days, although cough often lasts into the second week. A cold may last longer or be more severe in people who have chronic health issues. If your symptoms persist for more than 10 days or keep coming back, then something else may be going on, such as allergies, sinusitis, or secondary infection. Fever is an important sign, says Norman Edelman, MD, professor of preventive Medicine, internal Medicine, physiology, and biophysics at State University of New York at Stony Brook on Long Island. Adults with fever of 102 degrees F or higher and children with fever of 103 degrees F or higher should see a doctor. The contagious period for common cold has its own life span. A cold is most contagious during the first day or two after symptoms develop. Flu symptoms usually start within one to four days after infection. Unlike common cold, effects of influenza virus infection can come on very suddenly. The first signs of flu are often fever or chills, accompanied by headache, sore throat, dry cough, runny nose, muscle aches, and fatigue. As illness progresses, person may have warm, flush skin, watery or bloodshot eyes, severe cough that produces phlegm, and nasal congestion. Nausea and vomiting may also occur, especially among children, according to Merck Manual. Bouts of flu typically last for several days or occasionally weeks, with severe symptoms subsiding in two to three days. However, weakness, fatigue, dry cough, and reduced ability to exercise can linger for six to eight weeks.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

What is a recurrent fever?

Table

SymptomsColdFlu
FeverSometimes, usually mildUsual; higher (100-102 F; occasionally higher, especially in young children); lasts 3 to 4 days
HeadacheOccasionallyCommon
General Aches, PainsSlightUsual; often severe
Fatigue, WeaknessSometimesUsual; can last 2 to 3 weeks
Extreme ExhaustionUnlikelyUsual; at the beginning of the illness
Stuffy NoseCommonSometimes
SneezingUsualSometimes
Sore ThroatCommonSometimes
Chest Discomfort, CoughMild to moderate; hacking coughCommon; can become severe
ComplicationsSinus congestion; middle ear infectionSinusitis, bronchitis, ear infection, pneumonia; can be life-threatening
PreventionWash your hands often; avoid close contact with anyone with a coldWash your hands often; avoid close contact with anyone who has flu symptoms; get the annual flu vaccine
TreatmentDecongestants; pain reliever/fever reducer medicinesDecongestants, pain relievers, or fever reducers are available over the counter; over-the-counter cough and cold medicines should not be given to young children; prescription antiviral drugs for flu may be given in some cases; call your doctor for more information about treatment.

FeVer is part of your body's natural defense system. Your immune system is part of your body that works to fight off illnesses. When this system is trigger, your body temperature heats up. Typically, your average body temperature should be around 98. 6 Fahrenheit. FeVer is a temperature of 100. 4 Fahrenheit or higher. If you take childs temperature orally or axillary, you might get reading thats up to one degree off. To get the most accurate temperature reading, take childs temperature rectally. Recurring FeVer is FeVer that happens multiple times over a period of time. These fevers can sometimes be described as episodic, meaning that they come and go. Recurrent FeVer is one that comes back in pattern. For example, your young child or toddler could have FeVer every month. This type of FeVer is typically seen in young children, usually under age 5. Increase temperature last for a few days and then go away for a stretch of time. The child is healthy and acts normally in between fevers. Recurrent FeVer is one of the main symptoms of collection of conditions called periodic FeVer syndromes. These are diseases that cause person typically child to have FeVer in space out pattern over time, without having virus or bacterial infection.


What are periodic fever syndromes?

Periodic fever syndromes refer to diseases that cause periodic fever that do not have an infectious cause. In general, children with these syndromes are well between episodes. Many of these syndromes are hereditary and result from mutations in gene. Syndromes are defined by several factors, including: gene defect clinical features of syndrome parts of body affect in addition to fever age of child when syndrome start ethnicity of child and parents many of these syndromes have specific treatment, often based on understanding problem caused by genetic defect.


What is hyperimmunoglobulin D syndrome (HIDS)?

HIDS, also called Mevalonate Kinase associate Periodic Fever Syndrome, is an autosomal recessive genetic Syndrome that results in episodic high Fever with skin rash, swelling of lymph nodes in the neck, abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhea. Disease starts early in infancy. The name of this disease comes from the fact that most patients have very high amounts of immunoglobulin of type D. Most severe forms of this disease start at birth and is called mevalonic aciduria. These patients also have neurologic disease and suffer from poor growth. The form of this condition that is described below is mild form because that is the only type that starts with episodes of Fever.

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Table V

NSAIDSGastritis, gastric ulcer, gastroesophageal reflux, rash, edema, liver/renal toxicity uncommon in children
CorticosteroidsInfection, weight gain, muscle atrophy, adrenocortical insufficiency, osteopenia, growth delay, avascular necrosis, emotional lability, rash, edema, hypertension, diabetes
ColchicineNausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, anorexia, peripheral neuropathy, muscle weakness, rhabdomyolysis, renal/liver toxicity, rash
EtanerceptInfection, injection site reaction, CNS/demyelinating disorder, ANA positivity, malignancy (very low risk)
InfliximabInfection (risk > etanercept), allergic reaction, anaphylaxis, nausea, diarrhea, abdominal pain, fatigue, elevated LFTs, serum sickness, ANA positivity, CNS/demyelinating disease, increased heart failure, cytopenias, future malignancy (risk > etanercept)
AnakinraInfection, severe injection site reaction/pain, future malignancy
RilonaceptInfection, injection site reaction, hypersensitivity reaction, hyperlipidemia, ? future malignancy
CanakinumabInfection, injection site reaction, diarrhea, nausea, vertigo, weight gain, myalgias, headache, future malignancy
TocilizumabInfection, thrombocytopenia, allergic reaction, anaphylaxis, CNS/demyelinating disorder, GI perforation, elevated LFTs, hyperlipidemia, future malignancy
AzathioprineInfection, leukopenia, pancytopenia with low thiopurine S-methyl transferase (TPMT) activity, liver toxicity, nausea, vomiting, secondary malignancy
SimvastatinConstipation, dyspepsia, rhabdomyolysis, hepatitis, acute renal failure
CimetidineHeadache, cytopenias
ThalidomideInfection, peripheral neuropathy, somnolence, teratogenicity, rash, dizziness, mood changes
CyclosporineInfection, hypertension, renal toxicity, renal failure, hirsutism, GI upset, malignancy, CNS toxicity, gingival hyperplasia
TonsillectomyPain/risks from surgery

Table VI.

DrugIndicationRisksBenefits
NSAIDSArthritis; pain, feverAdverse reactionsReduce fever, pain, arthritis
CorticosteroidsFever, arthritis, serositis, urticaria, vasculitis, lymphadenopathy, organ inflammation/damageAdverse reactions; may shorten interval between or increase frequency of PFAPA attacks in 30%.Relieve fever, rash; improve adenopathy, arthritis; lessen organ involvement, serositis
ColchicineTreatment of FMF and possible PFAPA; fever, aphthous stomatitis, 2 amyloidosis in FMFAdverse reactions; short-lived benefit in PFAPAPrevents attacks in >70% and decreases attacks in 95% of FMF (no effect in TRAPS, HIDS, CAPS); lowers serum amyloid A (SAA) in FMF; decreases/prevents 2 amyloidosis in FMF; reduces fever, oral aphthae; decreases recurrences of PFAPA in >50%.
EtanerceptTreatment for TRAPS; arthritis, aphthous stomatitis, fever, 2amyloidosis and other complicationsAdverse reactions; may trigger flares of TRAPS and MASControls fever, arthritis, aphthous stomatitis; improve inflammatory markers; lowers SAA; reduces 2 amyloidosis and ? other complications in TRAPS
InfliximabChronic arthritis, fever and inflammation not controlled by etanercept, chronic uveitis, macrophage activation syndrome (MAS)Adverse reactions; triggers paradoxical flares of TRAPSControls fever, arthritis, aphthous stomatitis, uveitis; improves inflammatory markers; improves MAS
AnakinraTreatment of CAPS; fever, urticaria, rash, arthritis, elevated ESR/CRP; MAS and some FMF, HIDS and TRAPS unresponsive to conventional therapy, consider for FPAPA.Adverse reactions; triggers flare of inflammation; no long-lasting disease control off treatmentRemits fever, rash, arthritis and laboratory abnormalities in FCAS, MWS (less effective in NOMID) and some FMF, HIDS, TRAPS, FPAPA; lowers SAA; reduces 2 amyloidosis and other complications in CAPS; remits MAS.
RilonaceptTreatment of CAPS; fever, rash, arthritis, laboratory abnormalitiesAdverse reactions;Remits fever, rash, arthritis and laboratory abnormalities in many CAPS patients
CanakinumabTreatment of CAPS and ? colchicine-resistant FMF; fever, rash, arthritis, laboratory abnormalitiesAdverse reactionsFull remission in > 95% CAPS patients; normalizes SAA; reduces 2 amyloidosis and other long-term complications in CAPS
TocilizumabTreatment of TRAPS unresponsive to etanercept or anakinra; arthritis, elevated ESR/CRPAdverse reactionsNormalizes CRP, ESR and SAA ; effect on 2 amyloidosis unknown
AzathioprineHIDS resistant to standard therapyAdverse reactionsMay reduce HIDS symptoms in a few patients
CyclosporineHIDS resistant to standard therapyAdverse reactionsMay reduce HIDS symptoms and episodes in a few patients
ThalidomideTreatment of NOMID, TRAPS, FMF resistant to standard therapy; arthritis, aphthous stomatitisAdverse reactionsMay reduce ESR/CRP in a few HIDS patients
SimvastatinHIDS resistant to standard therapyAdverse reactions; may trigger flares of HIDSMay reduce HIDS episodes in a few patients
* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Flu Complications

Table

SymptomsColdFlu
FeverSometimes, usually mildUsual; higher (100-102 F; occasionally higher, especially in young children); lasts 3 to 4 days
HeadacheOccasionallyCommon
General Aches, PainsSlightUsual; often severe
Fatigue, WeaknessSometimesUsual; can last 2 to 3 weeks
Extreme ExhaustionUnlikelyUsual; at the beginning of the illness
Stuffy NoseCommonSometimes
SneezingUsualSometimes
Sore ThroatCommonSometimes
Chest Discomfort, CoughMild to moderate; hacking coughCommon; can become severe
ComplicationsSinus congestion; middle ear infectionSinusitis, bronchitis, ear infection, pneumonia; can be life-threatening
PreventionWash your hands often; avoid close contact with anyone with a coldWash your hands often; avoid close contact with anyone who has flu symptoms; get the annual flu vaccine
TreatmentDecongestants; pain reliever/fever reducer medicinesDecongestants, pain relievers, or fever reducers are available over the counter; over-the-counter cough and cold medicines should not be given to young children; prescription antiviral drugs for flu may be given in some cases; call your doctor for more information about treatment.

Influenza, Flu, is a common, very infectious viral infection. Over the years, many people have used the term flu to describe anything from stomach bug to bout of food poisoning, but influenza is a respiratory illness and doesnt have anything to do with the gastrointestinal system-system that runs from your mouth to your rectum. People who are infected with the influenza virus may develop sepsis. Sometimes incorrectly called blood poisoning, sepsis is bodys often deadly response to infection. Sepsis kills and disables millions and requires early suspicion and rapid treatment for survival. Sepsis and septic shock can result from infection anywhere in the body, such as pneumonia, influenza, or urinary tract infections. Worldwide, one-third of people who develop sepsis die. Many who do survive are leave with life-changing effects, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, chronic pain and fatigue, organ dysfunction and / or amputations. Doctors have found that rates of sepsis and severe sepsis tend to go up during the so-call Flu season. Influenza and COVID-19 are two separate viruses, but they both affect the respiratory system. Their initial symptoms can be quite similar: cough, fever, aches and pains. Experts are encouraging people to get their seasonal Flu vaccine sooner than later in 2020 to avoid a so-call twindemic. There are concerns that influenza cases will peak at same time as the second wave of COVID-19, if one occurs. Fears are two-fold. If you develop symptoms that overlap two infections, doctors will know which one you may have. You will have to undergo COVID-19 testing and medical staff will have to take necessary precautions until COVID-19 is ruled out. The second issue is if you get the flu, your immunity drops as your body fights infection. This makes you more vulnerable to catching COVID-19 if you are exposed to it. It is possible to have both infections at same time. There are different types of influenza. There is annual seasonal influenza and others, such as H1N1 influenza, avian Flu, and swine Flu. There are three separate types of viruses: Type: Type influenzas affect both people and animals, such as birds. Animals help spread viruses which can be very serious. Type flus are ones that cause most flu pandemics or epidemics. In 1918, world was hit with Spanish Flu, which killed millions of people. It was fear in 2009 that the H1N1 virus would have similar outcomes. Type B: Type B influenzas do not infect animals and do not cause epidemics or pandemics, but they still can cause serious harm. Type C: Type C influenzas are milder than either types or B. They do not cause epidemics or pandemics and they only affect humans. Viruses that cause influenza are not static, which means they do not stay the same. They can change and mutate, turning into new viruses.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

What Is Normal?

Table

SymptomsColdFlu
FeverSometimes, usually mildUsual; higher (100-102 F; occasionally higher, especially in young children); lasts 3 to 4 days
HeadacheOccasionallyCommon
General Aches, PainsSlightUsual; often severe
Fatigue, WeaknessSometimesUsual; can last 2 to 3 weeks
Extreme ExhaustionUnlikelyUsual; at the beginning of the illness
Stuffy NoseCommonSometimes
SneezingUsualSometimes
Sore ThroatCommonSometimes
Chest Discomfort, CoughMild to moderate; hacking coughCommon; can become severe
ComplicationsSinus congestion; middle ear infectionSinusitis, bronchitis, ear infection, pneumonia; can be life-threatening
PreventionWash your hands often; avoid close contact with anyone with a coldWash your hands often; avoid close contact with anyone who has flu symptoms; get the annual flu vaccine
TreatmentDecongestants; pain reliever/fever reducer medicinesDecongestants, pain relievers, or fever reducers are available over the counter; over-the-counter cough and cold medicines should not be given to young children; prescription antiviral drugs for flu may be given in some cases; call your doctor for more information about treatment.

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: Every few weeks my toddler will develop a fever that lasts for a couple of days but then goes away. Other than Fever, she doesnt have any other symptoms. Could it be periodic Fever syndrome? How is that diagnosed, and is treatment for it different than treating normal fever in kids? Fever is a rise in body temperature. It is often a sign of infection, but not always. Fever itself generally doesnt cause any harm. In fact, it can act as a protective mechanism, helping to rid the body of bacteria, viruses and other causes of infection. The average body temperature is 98. 6 degrees Fahrenheit, or 37 degrees Celsius. But normal body temperature can range from 97 F to 99 F or higher. Body temperature may change depending on the person's level of activity and time of day. In general, younger people have higher normal body temperatures than older people. With most periodic fever syndromes, body temperature is normal for several weeks, and then it rises quickly to high fever, sometimes even as much as 104 F or 105 F. Fever lasts for several days, and then it goes away on its own. Several types of periodic Fever syndrome exist. The most common one is called PFAPA. That stands for periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenitis. Children who have this condition may develop sore throat and mouth sores along with swelling of glands in the neck during fever episode. With PFAPA, fever cycle repeats about every three to five weeks. This disorder is the most common cause of fever that recurs at regular intervals in children. It often starts during the first five years of life. The underlying cause of PFAPA is not clear. Diagnosis is based on several factors, in addition to the recurring cycle of Fever. First, children who have this condition dont have infection, as is typical for people with Fever. Second, over-counter medications that usually lower fevers, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen, have little if any effect on fever. Third, although children will drink, they usually will not want to eat during the episode. Fourth, and most importantly, each Fever episode is very similar to the one before. There is no blood test for PFAPA, but testing is sometimes done to look for infection or one of other less common periodic fever syndromes. If your child is diagnosed with PFAPA, her doctor likely will recommend a single oral dose of corticosteroid medication such as prednisone. In most cases, that brings the body temperature back to normal within a few hours. Fever doesnt come back again until the cycle repeats in a few weeks, when another dose of corticosteroid can be give. Regular treatment is recommended for PFAPA so that child doesnt miss school or daycare each month. Most children eventually outgrow PFAPA and no longer need medication. Some parents worry about the effects having high fever on a regular basis may have on their child.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Influenza (Flu) in Children

Flu strikes more quickly than cold, and makes people feel worse. Children with colds usually have energy to play and keep up their daily routines. Children with influenza are usually in bed. Sudden fever, chills and shakes, headache, muscle aches, extreme fatigue, dry cough and sore throat and, loss of appetite. Children with flu may have many of the same symptoms as adults, but there can be differences: newborns and babies may have high fever that ca be explain, and no other signs of sickness. Young children usually have temperatures over 39. 5C and may have febrile seizures. Upset stomach and pain, vomiting, and diarrhea are common in younger children. Earaches and red eyes are also common. In some cases, muscle inflammation can lead to severe leg or back pain.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Specific cancer symptoms

After weeks of suffering from fatigue and shortness of breath in the fall of 2016, Hunter Brady went to the doctor, who diagnosed him with the flu. But when 16-year-olds prescribe Treatment didnt relieve his symptoms, second opinion revealed the Florida boy had stage IV Hodgkin lymphoma. Fatigue, chills, fever, weight loss, swollen lymph nodes and persistent cough are common symptoms of flu. But they also are common symptoms of some cancers, especially hematologic malignancies, such as lymphoma and leukemia. As flu season approaches, there may be rare cases when patients who think they have flu are later diagnosed with cancer, said Mashiul Chowdhury, MD, Chief of Infectious Diseases at Cancer Treatment Centers of America, though he says there is no need for anyone to be alarm, stressing that occurrences are rare. Symptoms of flu or infection often are similar to symptoms of cancer because some of the mechanisms are quite similar, Dr. Chowdhury say. Your immune system is down. So, you feel malaise, you have fever. Then you go to get a chest X-ray and you get bad surprisecancer.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Metastatic cancer symptoms

While it is rare for cancer to be inaccurately diagnosed like the flu, several cases have made headlines. For instance: in 2012, women who fought through weeks of flu symptoms were later treated at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, for thyroid Cancer. In 2016, Jaime Luis Gomez, know as rapper Taboo and former member of pop group Black Eyed Peas, said in an interview that he thinks his pain, headaches and shortness of breath were brought on by the flu. He was later diagnosed with stage II testicular Cancer. Inaccurate diagnoses should not cause panic. Dr. Chowdhury says patients who have been diagnosed with flu or have flu-like symptoms should not be alarmed or immediately think they have something other than flu. But if symptoms worsen or do not get better after two weeks, they should see a doctor. If you have an infection, and this is especially important for older people, and it lasts longer than average period, then there should be concern, Dr. Chowdhury say. Then you need to go tell your doctor this is not going away.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

What is influenza?

Table

SymptomsColdFlu
FeverSometimes, usually mildUsual; higher (100-102 F; occasionally higher, especially in young children); lasts 3 to 4 days
HeadacheOccasionallyCommon
General Aches, PainsSlightUsual; often severe
Fatigue, WeaknessSometimesUsual; can last 2 to 3 weeks
Extreme ExhaustionUnlikelyUsual; at the beginning of the illness
Stuffy NoseCommonSometimes
SneezingUsualSometimes
Sore ThroatCommonSometimes
Chest Discomfort, CoughMild to moderate; hacking coughCommon; can become severe
ComplicationsSinus congestion; middle ear infectionSinusitis, bronchitis, ear infection, pneumonia; can be life-threatening
PreventionWash your hands often; avoid close contact with anyone with a coldWash your hands often; avoid close contact with anyone who has flu symptoms; get the annual flu vaccine
TreatmentDecongestants; pain reliever/fever reducer medicinesDecongestants, pain relievers, or fever reducers are available over the counter; over-the-counter cough and cold medicines should not be given to young children; prescription antiviral drugs for flu may be given in some cases; call your doctor for more information about treatment.

It's important to know the difference between flu and cold symptoms. A cold is a milder respiratory illness than the flu. While cold symptoms can make you feel bad for a few days, flu symptoms can make you feel quite ill for few days to weeks. Flu can also result in serious health problems such as pneumonia and hospitalizations cold symptoms usually begin with a sore throat, which usually resolve after a day or two. Nasal symptoms, runny nose, and congestion follow, along with cough by fourth and fifth days. Fever is uncommon in adults, but possible, whereas children are more likely to have fever with cold. Cold symptoms usually last for about a week. During the first three days that you have cold symptoms, you are contagious. If cold symptoms do not seem to be improving after a week, you may have bacterial infection, which means you may need antibiotics, or it may mean you have allergies. Sometimes you may mistake cold symptoms for allergic rhinitis or sinus infection. If your cold symptoms begin quickly and are improving after a week, then it is usually a cold, not an allergy. If your cold symptoms do not seem to be getting better after a week, check with your doctor to see if you have developed allergies or sinusitis. Flu symptoms are usually more severe than cold symptoms and come on quickly. Symptoms include sore throat, fever, headache, muscle aches and soreness, congestion, and cough. Swine flu, in particular, is also associated with vomiting and Diarrhea. Most flu symptoms gradually improve over two to five days, but it's not uncommon to feel fatigued and tired for weeks. A possible complication of the flu is pneumonia, especially in young, elderly, or people with lung or heart problems. If you notice shortness of breath, you should let your doctor know. Recurring Fever after initially resolution may mean you have pneumonia. Just like cold viruses, flu viruses enter your body through mucous membranes of your nose, eyes, or mouth. Every time you touch your hand to one of these areas, you could be infecting yourself with a virus. Therefore, it is very important to keep your hands clean with frequent washing to prevent both flu and cold symptoms. Flu symptoms can be similar to cold symptoms with nasal congestion, cough, aches, and malaise. However, fever is unusual with cold. With flu symptoms, you will probably have fever initially. Body and muscle aches are also more common with flu. See table below to help you distinguish between the two. Usually, time of year will give you some sense of what you're dealing with. The Standard flu season runs from fall to spring of next year. If you already have flu or cold symptoms, it's important to call your doctor if you also have any of the following severe symptoms: Persistent Fever: this can be a sign of another bacterial infection that should be treat.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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