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Salti Hernandez

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Last Updated: 02 July 2021

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Salti Hernandez

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The consequences of mental health stigma are extensive. It makes mental illness seem like a character flaw, which is totally untrue, and can prevent people from seeking support that could help them manage their condition. Worst Part? People contribute to that stigma a lot more than they might realize. Most well-meaning people do purposefully act in a way that doesnt show compassion for millions of people who have mental health disorders. But there are still some everyday behaviours that contribute to negative stereotypes. Here are a few things you should be mindful of, according to experts. Sure, it sad if your favourite TV show goes off air. You might seem quirky if you like to organize your things in a particular way. But saying either of those things make you depressed or have OCD is false and trivializes real mental health conditions. Awareness of language is essential, says Shari Harding, mental health expert and professor of nursing at Regis College in Massachusetts. We are all guilty of being imprecise or hyperbolic at times, but it is important to avoid misusing language. Drawing an oversimplified connection between mental health and mass shootings sends inaccurate message about mental health disorders. People who live with mental health disorders are more likely to be victims of violent crimes than ones committing them. Fewer than 5 percent of gun-related killings are committed by someone diagnosed with mental illness, according to a 2015 study. Its common for people to use phrases like these to insult someone they think do something wrong. But such pejorative terms further perpetuate the inaccurate idea that people with mental illnesses should be ashamed or fear, according to Dan Reidenberg, executive director of Suicide Awareness Voices of Education. People show mental health stigma by making inappropriate comments about illnesses that ravage the mind, Reidenberg say. Often they think these off-cuff remarks are harmless, but the reality is that they hurt those living with mental illnesses, and their families, and they increase misperceptions about illnesses. We see this happen frequently in politics, sports and even among children. Think of it this way: You wouldnt call someone who has cancer cancerous person. The same rules apply to someone experiencing a mental health condition. One of the most common accidents is avoiding use of person-first language, such as when people use terms like schizophrenic or borderline instead of person with schizophrenia or person with borderline personality disorder, Harding say. Former terms are stigmatizing because they reduce whole person to diagnostic label. We see this lot when people talk about celebrities. It is often considered newsworthy when someone famous Act out either on social media or in real life, but that behaviour could be indicative of mental health issue. Take former NBA player Delonte West, for example. A fan saw West walking outside a Houston fast food restaurant without shoes on in 2016, and documented the encounter on social media.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Cash Bond Account

Despite a prolific college career at Florida, HERNANDEZ famously fell to the fourth round of the 2010 NFL draft. New England had already selected Rob Gronkowski in the second frame, so adding a dynamic pass-catcher of Hernandezs caliber was just icing on cake. The former Gator became an immediate contributor, racking up 45 catches, 563 yards and six touchdowns as a rookie. In his second season, HERNANDEZ proved to be one of the NFL's greatest mismatches. Operating as move tight end, traditional wide receiver and even running back, HERNANDEZ nearly doubled his numbers in 2011. He finished the season with 79 catches, 910 yards and seven touchdowns before the Patriots fell in the Super Bowl to the New York Giants. Just before the 2012 season kicked off, Patriots locked up their promising tight end to a staggering 40 million contract extension that includes a then-record 12. 5 million signing bonus. The deal included nearly 16 million guaranteed and should have set the stage for a long career in New England. Along with Gronk, Patriots revolutionized the game with a two-tight end system that should have brought multiple championships to Foxborough.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Eric Lentz

Chicago journalist Carlos Hernandez Gomez's battle with colon cancer play out in a particularly public way. CLTV reporter-know for his sharp coverage of Illinois corruption-even uses his Twitter to narrate his final chapter. His last tweet-Who can sleep in hospital?-Come on November 14 2009, two months before his death. When Gomez died in January 2010, scores of well-know journalists and political figures chimed in on the legacy he left behind after just 36 years on earth. From Chicago Readers's Mick Dumke, who remembers him as an old-school reporter dressed like he was a member of the Rat Pack, to the Chicago Tribune's John Chase, who praised his machine-gun style of questioning public figures. Even President Obama made a statement about Hernandez Gomez, who cover then-state senator in Springfield. I quickly learn that when you saw his sharp fedora in the crowd, hard questions were coming, Obama say. Carlos was a role model to many, and an integral part of Chicago story he striven to tell. Three years after his death, Hernandez Gomez's wife-WGN reporter Randi Belisomo-is honoring him in a way that may come as a surprise: she pushing people to talk more openly about death with their loved ones. Though Hernandez Gomez was diagnosed with incurable, stage IV colon cancer, Belisomo said the couple always struggle to discuss difficult decisions ahead of them. He was a journalist, I was a journalist, she say. We communicate for living. But we couldnt communicate about it. It was the elephant in the room. Now, Belisomo wants others to avoid the same outcome. Teaming up with her husband doctor, Mary Mulcahy of Northwestern Medicine, Belisomo has launched a website to encourage individuals to discuss end-of-Life decisions in a preemptive way to meet death with more dignity. The initiative is called Life Matters Media. Looking back, Belisomo says she and her husband could have been much more prepared for his death, which stemmed from a blood clot. I think it would be a slow departure, Belisomo say. It become sudden, traumatic event. In particular, couple never discuss what would happen if Hernandez Gomez had to be placed on Life support, which ultimately happen. Together with her husband's family, Belisomo made a call to remove her husband from this support. Months later, she found herself working out alongside her husband's physician. I say, Why do you never say Carlos, you are dying? Belisomo say. It was a game changer. It changes the way she has these conversations. Now, Belisomo and Mulcahy are close partners on an initiative that, they hope, will disrupt the paradigm that often keeps patients from discussing death with their families and doctors. Together, theyre speaking out on things like advanced directives, power of attorney forms, and organ donation. We want to reach people before they have to deal with big decisions, Dr. Mulcahy say.


April 11, 2020

Joseph V. Ramos, 73, of Toledo, Ohio, formerly of Defiance, passed away on Wednesday, April 1, 2020, at ProMedica Bay Park Hospital in Oregon, Ohio, after a six day battle with Coronavirus. He was born on October 20 1946, to Sesario and Marcos Ramos in Mount Pleasant, Michigan. Joseph was a former member of. John Catholic Church, and was altar boy as a youth. He served in the Vietnam War from 1967-1969. He worked at General Motors for over 29 years until his retirement in 1999. Joe was loved by many and was affectionately called Jody Coyote by his friends. He loved to sing and play his guitar and accordion. His favorite songs to sing were Beatles yesterday and Michelle, as well as Tejano music and songs by Elvis. Joe was a good father and always willing to help his children in any way he could. He enjoys going to Hispanic dances, fishing, working on his cars, and telling silly jokes. He will be sadly miss, especially by his children, but we rejoice in that he is no longer suffering. Joseph is survived by his children, Andrea Rodriguez of Defiance, Kristi Mabie of Perrysburg, OH, Nick Ramos of Los Angeles, CA, and Marcus Ramos of Defiance. He also left behind four grandsons, Nic Mabie and Aaron Mabie of Perrysburg, and Izaiah Ramos and Joel Ramos of Defiance; three sisters, Antonia Rios of Defiance, Rosie Vasquez of Albion, TX, and Margaret Urbina of Roundrock, TX; and many nieces and nephews. In addition to his parents; he was preceded in death by his brothers, Pete, Juan, and Frank Ramos; sisters, Angela Flores, Juanita Luna Arrizola, and Mary Hernandez; and grandson, Jamie Hernandez. Graveside service for Joe will be held on Tuesday, April 7 2020, at 1: 15 pm at Riverside Cemetery in Defiance, with Deacon Mark Homier officiating. The family wish to thank skilled and compassionate nurses and doctors at Bay Park Hospital and Concord Nursing Home. Memorials are suggested to the Coronavirus Relief Fund. Online condolences can be give at www. Schafferfh.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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