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Scandinavian Christmas

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Last Updated: 02 July 2021

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These curious customs help Scandinavians get through months-long winter darkness. Among all holidays and celebrations throughout the year, Christmas is a favorite of the Nordic region, vast swath of land that covers Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Iceland, and Finland. After long, gloomy fall and less than five hours of daylight at the peak of winter, Christmas marks a turning point when light begins to prevail over darkness. Its only natural that this holiday brings special joy to regions residents. But some of Nordic Christmas traditions may come as a surprise. Nordic Christmas roots go into the pagan holiday of Yule, days-long feast that was perhaps the most important celebration of the year, Winter Solstice. Yule is important for several reasons: It gives farmers something to do at time when field work is over; It lifts spirits during the toughest time of year, when sickness and cold temperatures often claim easy victims; and it defies forces of evil that lurk in the dark, giving hope to people in surviving long Scandinavian Winter still ahead. Hold around same dates in late December, Yule goes through the process of Christianization around 9 century AD when, with the efforts of missionaries, it started shaping into the holiday we know today. Christmas in the Nordics is still referred to by its pagan name: Jul in Sweden, Norway, and Denmark, Jol in Iceland, and Joulu in Finland. In most Nordic countries, weeks-long Christmas celebration kicks off on December 13. This tradition of starting early, particularly strong in Sweden, is also observed in Norway, Finland, and Denmark. Call Saint Lucia Day in honor of the 4-century martyr from Syracuse, day begins with young girls wearing wreath of long white candles on their heads and treating the rest of the family to special saffron-flavor lussekater buns. In Iceland, festivities start even earlieron first Advent Sunday. That when decades-Old annual lighting of Oslo Christmas Tree, gift to the city of Reykjavik by its Norwegian neighbor, occurs at Austurvollur Square. The long-awaited events gather thousands, but it is particularly anticipated by families with small children. It is not uncommon for Nordics to get two weeksfrom December 24 to January 6off from work for Christmas. Across the region, festivities last all way to January 6, Day of Epiphany, also called Day of Three Kings. The day is celebrated across the Christian world as a time when Three Magi come bearing gifts to visit baby Jesus, but in the Nordics, it marks the end of Christmas celebrations. In many homes, Christmas Tree is keep until then to keep the spirit going. In just about every Nordic culture, mythical creatures start visiting homes twelve days before Christmas. At bedtime, children leave slippers on the window sill in anticipation of gifts from nightly visitor. In the morning, slippers of those deemed well-behave will be laden with small toys, candy, or cookies.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Jul & Christmas

Season's eatings is the name of the game around this time of year, and boy do Scandinavians know how to eat, but because these countries are so close together, many of their foods and customs overlap. In Norway, salt or smoke rack of lamb, lutefisk, Christmas sausage and spiced meatballs are stars of Christmas meal, while pastries like krumkake, fattingmann, rosettes and lefse help bring a little sweetness to the day. Sweden, Norway's neighbor to the east, celebrates Christmas with a full smorgasbord. Swedes enjoy Christmas ham, pork sausage, pickle herring, potato sausage and more, finishing off with some fruktkaka and candy-studded toffee know as polkagriskola, as well as many other goodies.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sweden

Swedish Christmas begins with Saint Lucia Day on December 13. Lucia was a third-century martyr who brought food to persecute Christians in hiding. Usually, eldest girl in the family portrays. Lucia, putting on a white robe in the morning and wearing a crown of candles. She serves her parents buns and coffee or mulled wine. Christmas trees are set up usually a couple of days before Christmas and decorated with flowers such as poinsettia, called julstjarna in Swedish, red tulips, and red or white amaryllis. On Christmas Eve, or Julafton, Swedes celebrating Christmas attend Church services. They return home to a traditional family dinner, including a buffet dinner with ham, pork, or fish, and a variety of sweets. After festive Christmas Eve dinner, someone dresses up as Tomte. According to Swedish folklore, Tomte is a Christmas gnome who lives in the forest. Tomte is the Swedish equivalent of Santa Claus and hands out gifts. Merry Christmas greeting in Swedish is God Jul. Cities across Sweden offer all types of holiday events to take part in. In the capital and biggest city, Stockholm, there is a live version of the popular Swedish Holiday show Christmas Calendar series, with different performances happening on each day of December leading up to Christmas. In Uppsala, check out the Christmas concert held in Helga Trefaldighets churcha, building that dates back to the 1300s.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Denmark

Children help decorate their family Christmas trees in the weeks leading up to the Christmas holiday in Denmark, which formally begins on December 23. Celebration kicks off with a meal that includes traditional cinnamon rice pudding called grod. Santa Claus is known as Julemanden, which translates to Yule Man. He is said to arrive on sleigh draw by reindeer with presents for children. Julemanden is assisted with his Yuletide chores by elves know as julenisser, who are traditionally believed to live in places like attics and barns. Mischievous Danish elves play pranks on people during Christmastime. On Christmas Eve, many Danish families leave some rice pudding or porridge for elves, so they do not play any pranks on them. In the morning, children are delighted to find that porridge has been consumed while they slept. Meals on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day are quite elaborate. On Christmas Eve, Danes have a Christmas dinner, usually consisting of duck or goose, red cabbage, and caramelized potatoes. The traditional dessert is light rice pudding with whipped cream and chopped almonds. This rice pudding usually contains one whole almond, and whoever finds it wins the treat of chocolate or marzipan. On Christmas morning, Danish cupcakes called ableskiver are traditionally serve. For Christmas Day lunch, cold cuts and different types of fish usually make up the meal. On Christmas night, families gather around the Christmas tree, exchange presents, and sing carols. To say, merry Christmas, in Danish greet others by saying Glaedelig Jul. Christmas markets pop up all over the country during winter, and the best are in major cities like Copenhagen, Aarhus, Fyn, and Ribe. Tivoli Gardens, famous Copenhagen theme park, is completely remade during the holiday season. Except to seeing snow-covered trees, twinkling lights, and a sprawling Christmas market set-up across the park.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Norway

Christmas Eve is the main event in Norway. For many, it includes Church services and last-minute shopping for gifts. At 5 pm, churches ring their Christmas bells. Most people have dinner of ribbe or lutefisk at home, so restaurants are usually close. Christmas Eve dessert usually includes gingerbread or risengrynsgrot, hot rice pudding, and mull wine, Glogg, for grownups. Then Christmas gifts are open after dinner. Norway has a mischievous Christmas elf called Nisse. This folkloric creature is personified as white-beard, red wearing spirit of the Winter Solstice. Today, he has been integrated with the figure of Sinterklass, modern-Day Santa Claus. Like cookies traditionally left for Santa Claus today, it was customary to leave a bowl of rice porridge for Nisse. Paying homage to their Viking heritage, Norweigians recognize the tradition of Julebukk, in Norwegian, which translates to Yule Goat. Today it is symbolized by a Goat figurine made out of straw, created at the beginning of December, and often used as Christmas ornament. The Yule Goat's oldest representation is that of Thor's magical goats, which would lead him through the night sky. Yule Goat would protect house during Yuletide. It had been Norse tradition to sacrifice goats to gods and accompanying spirits during the time span between Winter Solstice and New Year. Yule Goat was a good luck charm for New Year to come. As with other Scandinavian countries, Christmas markets and concerts can be found in most cities across Norway during winter months. One extra special event is the world's largest gingerbread town, located in Bergen, Norway's second-largest city. Pepperkakebyen, as delicious town is call, is open to visitors each year from mid-November through the end of December. Merry Christmas in Norwegian is Gledelig Ju l or God Jul.


Christmas in Norway

Before we get going, if you want the full story, you can check out Christmas in Norway, available now exclusively on Kindle! Find out how Norwegians celebrate July in this short Kindle book, designed to inform and inspire your own Christmas celebrations, wherever you are in the world. It's available now in all Amazon stores, including Amazon. Com and Amazon UK. Full disclosure: this ebook was published several years ago and hasn't been update. However, traditions are slow to change, so there should still be plenty of relevant information inside. Merry Christmas Everyone. Or as they say around these parts: God Jul!

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Finland

Leave it to Finns to be a little more unconventional than their Scandinavian neighbours in just about everything. While sharing many of the same foods and traditions as neighbouring Sweden, Joulu in Finland has its own distinct charm. What else would you expect from your home country of Santa Claus? That's right, Rovaniemi is located on the Arctic Circle in Finnish Lapland claims the title of Santa's hometown. It's here where good boys and girls can visit man in red at Santa Claus Village and partake in other exciting Arctic pastimes like dog-sledding, reindeer sleigh rides, snowshoeing, cross country skiing and more. Of course, in Finland, Santa wasn't always the jolly old fellow we know and love today. Joulupukki in Finnish is also name for Christmas Goat, rather frightening Goat-like creature wearing a mask and a pair of horns on his head in the old days. Yikes! But over time, Joulupukki turns into an old man in Goat costume and, eventually, gift-giving, reindeer sleigh-riding figure. A modern Santa may drop down the chimney in other countries the night before Christmas, but in Finland he makes short home visits during family Christmas Eve dinners and knocks on the front door. Like gentleman. Similar to Swedish julbord, Finnish joulupoyta has a rich assortment of cold and warm dishes and glogi, alcoholic or non-alcoholic mull wine. There's also Christmas rice porridge sweetened with sugar and cinnamon, which often has blanched almond hidden somewhere in kettle. Whoever discovers it in their bowl gets a small gift. Similar traditions are found in other Nordic countries as well. And, of course, it's not proper Finnish Christmas without a Christmas Sauna! Before evening festivities take place on 24 of December it is customary to visit the Sauna for little purification of spirit. Parents might even tell their children to leave little offering, such as a bucket of water, afterwards for Saunatonttu, friendly Sauna elf.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Iceland

The Icelandic Christmas season lasts 26 days. It's the darkest time of year for that part of the world with not much daylight at all, but Northern Lights may be visible in the North of the country. Iceland has many age-Old traditions during Christmastime, including the arrival of 13 Icelandic Santa Clauses. The origin of these Santas is centuries old, and each has a name, character, and role. Know as jolasveinar, or yuletide Lads, Santas are children of Gryla, mean old woman who drag off naughty children and supposedly boils them alive. Her husband, Leppaluoi, is not quite as mean. In the modern era, these characters have been softened bit to be less frightening. Children in Iceland put shoes in their windows from December 12 until Christmas Eve. If they have been good, one of jolasveinar leave gift. Bad children can expect to receive potato. Shops are open until 11: 30 pm on Christmas Eve, and many Icelanders attend midnight mass. The main Christmas celebrations take place on Christmas Eve, including gift exchange. To express merry Christmas in Icelandic, greet others by saying Gleoileg jol. If you're looking for holiday activities in Iceland, Christmas Market in Hafnarfjorur is one of the largest and most popular, and is about a 20-minute drive outside of the capital city, Reykjavik. Apart from shopping, there are also hot food and drinks, horse-drawn carriage rides, and live music to keep you entertain.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Scandinavian Christmas Traditions | Norway

Nisse is a mythological creature from Scandinavian folklore, which could be compared to a garden gnome or goblin. According to tradition, they are present in farmhouses in which they act as guardians of those living there and even occasionally help with house chores. They were believed to be the soul of the first person living on the property, and are described as small creatures resembling Old Men with long beards and red conical caps. Nisser are typical character from Old Norse culture and are also associated with the Winter Solstice. Today, they have been assimilated into Christian culture in Scandinavia and appear in Christmas tales, decorations, and cards. Santa Claus, known in Norwegian as Julenisse, is himself a sort of nisse. Know in Norwegian as Grevinnen og Hovmesteren, Dinner for One is a British comedy sketch written by British author Lauri Wylie. German television station Norddeutscher Rundfunk recorded an 18-minute black-and-white performance of the show in 1953, which eventually became the most repeated TV program of all time. The sketch depicts the 90 birthday of Miss Sophie, who hosts a yearly dinner for her friends. Due to her old age, she has outlived them all, so her butler James impersonates and drinks instead of each of the guests. As he goes around the table, James gets noticeably drunk, and repeatedly asks Miss Sophie: same procedure as last year, Miss Sophie? To which she respond: same procedure as every year, James! Julaften, know as Christmas Eve in English, is the main day of celebration for Norwegians. Silver Boys Choir appear on national television for their annual festive concert, and at 5pm church bells ring throughout cities to announce the official start of the holiday. After their traditional meal, people usually hold hands and dance around the Christmas Tree while singing carols. The most famous song is Sa gar vi rundt om en enebrbusk, meaning here we go round mulberry bush. Julenissen, or Santa Claus, then came into the living room to hand out presents. Family and guests then play games, sing and open Gifts rest of evening. Since 1975, NRK shows Three Gifts for Cinderella every Christmas Eve. Similar to Dinner for One, it has become a holiday classic in Norway although it is not a Christmas movie per se. The movie is based on Bozena Nemcovas version of the tale of Cinderella, with a feminist approach in which the prince actively pursues skilled hunter Cinderella before she falls under his charm. The film was originally released in the Czech and Germany but NRK broadcasts it in Norwegian. Typical Norwegian Christmas dishes include risengrynsgrt, ribbe, pinnekjtt, lutefisk and rakfisk. Risengrynsgrt is a Norwegian rice porridge usually prepared for lunch on Christmas Day. It is served with sugar and cinnamon and a dab of butter in the centre. Almond is hidden in a large pot, and people who find it in their portion traditionally receive marzipan as a gift.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Red Color Scheme

BUTTON Tree Ornaments These BUTTON Tree Ornaments are made of brown / beige buttons stump and different shades and sizes of colorful buttons. The top is made of VINTAGE SHANK BUTTON or SNOWFLAKE. BUTTON trees are finished in silver ribbon. If you would like SPECIFIC COLOR or COLOR COMBO, please leave that in notes to seller section. These fun and cute BUTTON Ornaments come ready to hang on the Christmas Tree. They may also be used as a fun addition to stockings or as a fun tag to add a beautiful rustic touch to your Christmas Tree this holiday season. Make from bark and measured around 4 These were the highlights of my own Christmas Tree. Come in set of 6 and get ready to hang. Each one is hand cut by me by hand, so they are not perfect and no two are exactly alike, BUT that adds to the beauty of our products. Colors vary because these are cut from Bark sheets, so there may be some darker pieces than what is in the picture.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

Sources

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions.

* Please keep in mind that all text is machine-generated, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always get advice from professionals before taking any actions

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